Wanted Howland Pegasus H-3

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Garyk

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Mar 21, 2012
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11
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Summerton SC
Anybody out there know where one could find a set of plans for the Howland Pegasus H-3. The last known company to handle the plans (in VA) seems to have disappeared.

Gary
 

individualist

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Aug 26, 2008
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3
Location
Quebec, Canada
Paul Willie - My friend is looking for the instructional booklet that comes with the plans for the Howland Pegasus. He wants to learn about the aluminum welding techniques and tempering processes that come with welding aluminum. Could you make me a copy for a fee ? You can reach me at drewcliche@yahoo.ca

Blue Skies !
Drew
 

pwood66889

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Feb 10, 2007
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1,531
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Sopchoppy, Florida, USA
Hi, F. Gutier the Second. I visited this project oh, so long ago. Though thinking it might be a good break through, it just would not fit! I have to buy airplanes like I buy shoes = they have to fit me! The current ride (see avatar) was designed by a man over 6-foot tall. So it fit OK. Not having to allow for "Them Thingies On The Floor," I had plenty of room!
I have not corresponded with the guy in Raleigh in quite a few years. Last I saw, it was on a trailer; inflate the tires and go! I don't know if the flickr URL above will give the information you need to contact Bill. Wish you all the luck in the world!
Percy in SW FL, USA
 

fgutier2

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May 20, 2019
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It has to fit I'm 6' 235 lbs nice to know about the fit H-3 I had no ideal it was that small. I really love the H-3. It would be nice to get a set of plans and scale it up a few percent so a person 6' or lager could fit in it. It's be nice to just get the plans. Thanks for the information
 

pwood66889

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Yeah - it was a disappointment to me as he was most reasonable on pricing. But the prospect of nibbling on my knees throughout a cross-country sorta turned it off. People tend to design planes to fit them selves. Lemme know if you get any data; especially on the square aluminum tube welding.
 

fgutier2

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May 20, 2019
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Yeah - it was a disappointment to me as he was most reasonable on pricing. But the prospect of nibbling on my knees throughout a cross-country sorta turned it off. People tend to design planes to fit them selves. Lemme know if you get any data; especially on the square aluminum tube welding.
There should be no prolbem with weling it you can tig weld it or gas, I've done both. Valley Engineering and their Backyard Flyer in all T.I.G. welded the fualog is mostls 1.375" X o.0625"
'
Yeah - it was a disappointment to me as he was most reasonable on pricing. But the prospect of nibbling on my knees throughout a cross-country sorta turned it off. People tend to design planes to fit them selves. Lemme know if you get any data; especially on the square aluminum tube welding.
 

wanttobuild

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Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
652
Location
kuttawa, ky
Fgutier2

Most members here still have a problem with TIG welding Aluminum tube, it weakens it don't ya know! They have all read the statements and concluded that it must be true!
You know that you some manufactures are starting to realize that Yes you can weld Aluminum.
Yes there is a process that must be followed
 

fgutier2

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May 20, 2019
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Valley Engineering and their Backyard Flyer has a welded wing and fuselage it's all aluminum tubing the fuselage is 1.375" X 0.0625" tuning and the wing spar looks to be round tubing of O.D. 1" X 0.0625" it is all T.I.G. welded aluminum. The H-3 looks to be 1"X1"X0.0625 sq tubing welded fuselage I would think it be aluminum 6061-T6.
It would really help if someone with H-3 Pegasus plans could make some copies availabe to lend or a set of plans and makes copies than sell them out right.
 

billyvray

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Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
735
Location
Newnan, GA
I have a digital copy of the plans. What I don't have is a build manual that came with them, which would be very helpful. The plans are hand drawn and would be sufficient to build from, but some info is lacking which I think the manual would provide.
 

GeeZee

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Feb 25, 2019
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56
Location
Indianapolis, IN
Slightly OT but since we’re talking Burt Howland’s designs. I’d love to have plans/manual for the H2A Honeybee. Same welded aluminum construction but a Biplane. +/- 6g! Only downside is the cruise speed is listed as 64mph.
 

blane.c

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Jun 27, 2015
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capital district NY
Maybe someone will.

I am waiting for the masses to figure out Aluminum can be welded.
The strongest grades of aluminum the 2xxx series and 7xxx series CANNOT be welded except under what amounts to laboratory conditions.
6061, 5052, 30xx and 1100 can be welded.

I flew with aircraft that had much of the interior pieces of trim work and ducting connections that were oxy acetylene welded in the 30's and 40's and 50's The welding around the window the trim and the little ducts and eyebrows around the center console and instrument panel were a constant reminder that before industry sales people started telling everyone that they needed to arc weld aluminum it was done every day with oxy acetylene.

One of the main "secrets to welding anything is being able to see what you are doing. Without these lenses or equivalent you won't be able to see squat welding aluminum because of the orange flair of the aluminum welding flux.

https://www.tinmantech.com/products/safety-products/eye-protection/TM2000-high-accuracy-gas-welding-lens.php

Another secret is that you need the flux.

https://www.tinmantech.com/products/welding/welding-flux/aluminum-welding-flux.php

Understanding the alloys of aluminum.

http://www.alcotec.com/us/en/education/knowledge/techknowledge/understanding-the-alloys-of-aluminum.cfm
 

tdfsks

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Joined
Aug 29, 2005
Messages
14
Maybe someone will.

I am waiting for the masses to figure out Aluminum can be welded.
I think most people know enough to understand that welded aluminium in primary aircraft structure is best avoided.

6061-T6 would be the obvious candidate. This alloy attains it strength by thermal heat treatment (T6 means solution heat treatment with artificial aging). In essence solution heat treatment means heating to 990 F and cooling rapidly (quenching). Artificial aging means reheating to 320 F and holding for a time which is a function of thickness etc. To illustrate the significance of the heat treatment, the tensile strength of T6 material is 42 ksi and yield strength approx 30 ksi. Tensile strength of '0' condition (i.e annealed) material is 22 ksi with a yield strength of approx 14 ksi. To better understand what this means in practise, get a piece of '0' condition material and feel how soft it is by bending by hand. If '0' condition is not available, heat a piece of T6 (to about 775 F) and quench.

When you weld 6061-T6, the heat from the welding process will affect the temper and hence strength. Add enough heat and you will basically end up with annealed material in the heat affected zone around the weld. Generally, post weld strength of welded 6061-T6 will end up somewhere between the original tensile strength and the strength of the annealed material. The exact post weld strength will primarily be a function of how much heat is input during welding and which filler rod you use. Assuming well controlled heat input, you will end up with a loss of strength somewhere in the range of 30-50% .... that range being determined by filler rod selection. Now strength is also a strong function of heat input and so you need a carefully controlled welding process to produce consistent welds. Too much heat and you end up with an understength structure.

The post weld strength of 6061-T6 can be largely restored by heat treatment. However not all of the original strength will be recovered and this is again a function of filler rod selection. Post weld heat treatment is common for smaller components but not practical for a fuselage.

There is absolutely nothing to stop an aircraft being designed from welded 6061-T6 tube. However the designer needs to qualify his welding process to make sure that a consistent post weld strength is being achieved and then use a realistic design allowable for the welded aluminium in the structural analysis (or test). Obviously the structure will be heavier as a result of the low strength of the welded material. Also I doubt that too many homebuilders with a TIG in their home shop would have the skill to control the weld process to achieve consistent and reliable welds nor have the testing facilities to verify actual post weld strength. Consequently, I think welded 6061-T6 tube is best avoided.

The Sorrell Hiperlight ultralight from the 80's used a rear fuselage made from welded 6061-T6 however the higher stressed forward fuselage was welded 4130N. At least one of the Sorrell brothers was an aeronautical engineer and so knew what they were doing. In essence I believe this worked for the rear fuselage because the stresses had to be kept low anyway to avoid column buckling in the longerons and diagonals. The selection of 4130 for the more highly stressed forward fuselage, by a designer who knew what he was doing, is telling you something ..... especially on part 103 ultralight where saving every pound was important.

I cannot comment on the Howland designs as I have never seen the plans.
 
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wanttobuild

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Jun 13, 2015
Messages
652
Location
kuttawa, ky
You guys know your stuff. Maybe more than yours truly! Maybe not.
It is a brave new world that includes all kinds of new applications using old technology.
If one wanted to tig or ox accy weld 6061 and get the heat effected zone back up to snuff in a small shop, well there is a way. Outside the box of course! And really in a practical manner.

CFRP #Cantbebeat!
Yeah I've been playing with Carbon Fiber and I use UNI to weld it together
 
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