How do Finger Brakes work?

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StRaNgEdAyS

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Oct 20, 2003
Messages
816
Location
Northern NSW Australia
Yup!:D
I got it...
I like the simplicity of it even.
One thing I thought of was to put a small "notch" or detent in the track to give some indication of where the rudder travel stops, so there is some definative and easily noticable feel to the rudder pedal before it progresses into braking territory.
Back on the finger brakes, I wonder how many times I'd try to use the toe brakes on the pedals before I'd remember they aren't there anymore...:eek: :gig: :p:
 

Largeprime

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Joined
Feb 18, 2004
Messages
60
You do feel the breaks engage.
The rudder is at full, which you will feel in the air frame, then there is about 1 inch travel and then the break cylinders hit.

I drove my brother in laws van with power breaks from heck last weekend. I was bouncing at every stop light. 15 min later it was a non event. Back in my car i was supprised how much "play" im my breaks, 2 min later a non event.

This is a feel thing and really easy and intuitave to get used to.
 

John Slade

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Jan 5, 2003
Messages
157
Location
West Palm Beach, FL
I wonder how many times I'd try to use the toe brakes on the pedals before I'd remember they aren't there anymore
That's exactly what happened to me on the first flight. I instinctivelty reached for the non existent toe brakes I'd been used to. Took a couple of seconds for the brain to figure out why we wernt stopping and push on the main pedals. I haven't done this since.

I totally agree with Largeprime. It's a feel thing, and you get used to it almost immediately. Every plane you fly is different in some way or other. You tend to settle in fairly quickly - more quickly the more planes you've flown.
 

pylon500

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Dec 26, 2003
Messages
395
Location
Taree Airport Australia
at the end of right rudder travel the rudder hits a stop and you begin to depress brake for the right wheel. The same applies for the left rudder pedal and wheel.
Just want to be sure on this rudder pedal thing, you say the 'rudder' reaches full travel, then the brake starts to engage? :confused:
I take it then that you have a spring or something on the rudder cable to allow this extra movement without tearing out the rudder horn! :eek:
I would have thought that you would 'feel' the extra load of the brake system starting to engage along the pedal travel?
As for planting the nose wheel, does this happen when landing solo? This sounds like a main gear/CofG location problem?
Arthur.
 

Dust

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Joined
Feb 9, 2004
Messages
302
Location
Troy, Michigan
Yes there is a spring in the rudder controll system to stop the tearing out of the horn.

As for planting the nose wheel, does this happen when landing solo? This sounds like a main gear/CofG location problem?

Juan is new to flying the cozy and is not holding the nose off as he could. That being said, a forward CG does plant the nosewheel more than a rear CG does.

It's not a CG problem, it is just the way it is, heh heh heh


enjoy the build

dust
 

John Slade

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Joined
Jan 5, 2003
Messages
157
Location
West Palm Beach, FL
Juan is new to flying the cozy and is not holding the nose off as he could.
I presume you're referring to me.
I'm not holding the nose off (as I could) because I'm landing on a 3000 foot runway and don't have much time for finesse. Holding the nose off will tend to burn up runway quite quickly at 75kts.
 

dustind

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Joined
May 25, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Saint Michael, Minnesota
You can get hydraulic pressure switches for a few dollars that are made to be installed into the brakes of dirt bikes to make them street legal. Why not have two of those, one for each wheel with it's own light (small LED) on the dash. It would help you know how much brake force you are using. You could also have a light that tells you when the flap is at it's stop.
 
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