How a real aircraft engine works

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Pops, Sep 30, 2018.

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  1. Sep 30, 2018 #1

    Pops

    Pops

    Pops

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    Joe Fisher and Vigilant1 like this.
  2. Oct 1, 2018 #2

    TFF

    TFF

    TFF

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    I will give you the sound although I'm a Merlin Allison guy first. As for making one run, there is only one thing. It has nothing to with machines.
     
  3. Oct 1, 2018 #3

    don january

    don january

    don january

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    That's only one song they play. Every day I look up and say their playing my song. Cool Utube thou
     
  4. Oct 1, 2018 #4

    lr27

    lr27

    lr27

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    This weekend, I got to hear some big radials, though they didn't get really close. I think the aircraft was a B-25. Also, I probably heard a Merlin. I couldn't see it very well, but someone said a Mustang flew by.
     
  5. Oct 1, 2018 #5

    Tiger Tim

    Tiger Tim

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    I'm apparently not caffeinated enough but I just read this thread title as "How a rental aircraft engine works." All I could think was, don't be gentle, it's a rental.
     
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  6. Oct 2, 2018 #6

    dcstrng

    dcstrng

    dcstrng

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    Yep, as a kid I enjoyed just being at the airport when the airliners of the day (DC-3, DC-4, etc.) started up... no jetways in those days, and kids could just stand by the chain-link fence and watch/dream...
     
  7. Oct 2, 2018 #7

    smittysrv

    smittysrv

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    Very cool illustration!
     
  8. Oct 3, 2018 #8

    blane.c

    blane.c

    blane.c

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  9. Oct 3, 2018 #9

    Pops

    Pops

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    I love engines. Once a motor head always a motor head. When my oldest son was in the AF and stationed at North Little Rock air base with the C-130's, he would take me down to the test cell and watch the run ups of the C-130 engines , interesting to me.

    Back in the 1890's and first half of the 1900's in my area, they used huge hit and miss engines to pull cables for several miles to run pump jacks around the mountains for the oil wells. Single and dual Flywheels maybe 12/15 feet in dia. Oil well museum at Parkersburg, WV. Also interesting.
     
  10. Oct 3, 2018 #10

    TFF

    TFF

    TFF

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    I love engines. All kinds. My little Alfa engines are as close as a Ferrari engine I will get. Same engineers. I also love mechanical stuff in general. My new rabbit hole is watch repair videos on youtube. Crazy taking all this stuff apart and back together on something about the size of a thumb. Some of the automatic transmission rebuild videos are fascinating too.
     
  11. Oct 4, 2018 #11

    rdj

    rdj

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    Question for the radial engine gearheads here: if the purpose of the master (connecting) rod is to transmit the torque forces of the articulating rods about their pins to the #1 cylinder walls via the master rod piston, does that mean that the #1 cylinder sees more wear in service than the other cylinders in a radial engine?
     

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