Holiday reading ideas?

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Foundationer, Jul 8, 2019.

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  1. Jul 9, 2019 #21

    BJC

    BJC

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    The president of the company that I worked for was a retired USN Admiral who had been in charge of submarine operations during a chunk of cold war time covered in the book. We were standing just outside of a big meeting room, and had been talking about the upcoming meeting, when I mentioned that I had just read the book, and I wondered how factual and accurate it was. He immediately reacted; his face turned bright red, the veins in his neck suddenly stood out, and he barely could speak. When he did speak, he said, “Byron, the people who were interviewed for that book should be charged with treason, tried, found guilty, and appropriately punished.”

    My conclusion was that the book was pretty accurate.


    BJC
     
  2. Jul 9, 2019 #22

    plncraze

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    LOL!!! I had a college professor who had been in Intelligence and I said to him "How do you know when you can talk about all that secret stuff?" and he said you never talk about it.
    John Craven wrote his book as a response to "Blind Man" because he didn't want that to be telling his story when he could be telling it. I believe Craven said he did not see the picture of the Russian skeleton in the deck jacket as was told in the book.
     
  3. Jul 9, 2019 #23

    pictsidhe

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    I'll second Pratchett, Douglas Adams and throw in Kurt Vonnegut to confuse you.
     
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  4. Jul 9, 2019 #24

    deskpilot

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    David Graham's Down to a Sunless Sea (1979) is a post-apocalyptic novel about a planeload of people during and after a short nuclear war, set in a near-future world where the USA is critically short of oil.

    A well researched book and a gripping story.
     
  5. Jul 9, 2019 #25

    Mad MAC

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    If you want something light and funny (dry English style) I really enjoy Rivers of London (Midnight Riot in the US) series by Ben Aaronovitch. Best described as a crime series with wizards etc.
     
  6. Jul 9, 2019 #26

    Cunning_Runt

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    For some good aviation reads, try Ernest Gann's "Fate is the Hunter", or anything by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.
     
  7. Jul 10, 2019 #27

    MadProfessor8138

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    I'm not going to suggest a particular book,most people wouldn't appreciate my taste in literature.......zombie plagues,post apocalyptic.....etc.
    What I do recommend is jumping on YouTube and picking an audio book that you would enjoy....put your headphones on,listen to a book and still be able to do whatever activity you enjoy.
    It gets me through the long days in the shop at work and while in my shop at home working on my Stork at night.
    You would be surprised at the amount of topics and books that have been recorded.....something for everyone.

    Kevin
     
  8. Jul 10, 2019 #28

    narfi

    narfi

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    I have the 3 credits a month subscription to Audible and often end up buying extra credits.

    3M worktunes ear muffs, an audio book and a good mask make the sanding hours roll by.

    If you like audiobooks, and the genres you mention (looking at you MadProfessor), then you should look up Scott Sigler.

    He has some pretty good ones. You might like his Infected series. I really liked his Galactic Football series and side books set in the same universe, the best being Title Fight about a modified human fighting MMA against alien fighters and all the crime and violence you could imagine from a story like that.

    The books Scott nariates himself are pretty much full productions with sound effects etc.. and a fun over the top radio serial type presentation.
     
  9. Jul 10, 2019 #29

    MadProfessor8138

    MadProfessor8138

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    I've listened to his Infected series.....enjoyed it.

    Get on Youtube and you can find just about anything your heart desires for free without needing credits from Audible.
    Most of the recordings on Youtube are from Liebervox recordings.
    Hope I spelled that right......
    You will actually be surprised some times when you recognize a voice and realize it's someone from TV doing the reading....

    Kevin
     
  10. Jul 10, 2019 #30

    narfi

    narfi

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    I live in a world where cell data is nearly non existant and satalite wifi is not always consistent, so I need to be able to download and playback.

    I listened to Siglers books free when he had them on podiobooks.com which was a great site working directly with the authors. (I haven't tried them sence they changed hands/name) but overall I dont mind paying authors and narrators for their work, it seems the "right thing to do".

    It was my understanding libravox is all out of copyrite books? I have over heard a coworker listening to some of the classics and the reading was horrendous, probably playing Russian roulette on production quality, except instead of one bullet and 5 empty its 5 bullets and 1 empty.
     
  11. Jul 10, 2019 #31

    Topaz

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    The Peace War by Vernor Vinge.

    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.

    Eon and its sequel Eternity by Greg Bear. Skip the third book, Legacy.

    The entire Chanur saga of five books by C.J. Cherryh

    The Taltos series by Steven Brust (eleven books and counting)

    War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells. Yes, the original alien-invasion story. Ever.

    If you're really up for a challenge, but one with a big payoff, The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  12. Jul 10, 2019 #32

    jedi

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    I like the real thing (No Si Fi) so recommend "We" by Charles Lindburg and Sir Frances Taylor's stories about flying with Kingsford Smith and PBY exploration in the WWII era. No blood or guts, just good story telling of actual flights and personal history.

    Hope this is not too late for your holiday. The forth has passed.
     
  13. Jul 10, 2019 #33

    Pops

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    War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells was funny when you know it wasn/t real. LOL.

    I grew up before TV and remember all the old radio shows. We had a battery powered radio and a log wire to the tree in the front yard.
     
  14. Jul 10, 2019 #34

    pictsidhe

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    Catch 22
     
  15. Jul 10, 2019 #35

    narfi

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  16. Jul 11, 2019 #36

    wsimpso1

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    Stick and Rudder by Langewiesche
    Design for Flying by Thurston
    The Liberation Trilogy by Rick Atkinson (OK, that is three books, do them in order)
    Any of the Legion of the Damned pulp novels;
    Flight of Passage by Rinker Buck
    Zero Three Bravo by Mariana Gosnell
    Stranger to the Ground by Richard Bach (or anything else except Jonathon Livingston Segull)
    Any of the original Jack Ryan novels by Tom Clancy (Hunt for Red October, Red Dawn, Clear and Present Danger... those)
    Fate is the Hunter by Ernest Gann
    Fighter Pilot by Robin Olds
     
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  17. Jul 11, 2019 #37

    gtae07

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    Finally coming back to post... wife and I are big Science Fiction geeks so that’s most of my “fun” reading.

    Heinlein’s Starship Troopers (no, there was no such movie, only a hack who stole the title...) and The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress.

    Arthur C. Clarke’s complete short story collection or almost anything else he wrote

    John Scalzi’s Old Man’s War series

    Anything by Terry Pratchett (my particular favorites are the Discworld books where Sam Vimes is a major character)

    Niven and Pournelle’s The Mote in God’s Eye

    Neal Stephenson’s Anathem

    James S A Corey’s (pen name for two guys) The Expanse, also a (rarely) well-done TV series

    Marko Kloos’s series (more space opera than science fiction but good light reading)

    Dennis Taylor’s Bobiverse (Starts with We Are Legion)

    If you’re willing to read something that just Some Guy on the Internet wrote, look up The Last Angel (Book 2 is nearly finished) and The Deathworlders (both post new chapters around the end of the month). They will both keep you busy for a long time.


    For non-fiction:

    Guy Murchie’s Song of the Sky

    James Mahaffey’s books on nuclear power and nuclear accidents

    I have several good books on the Apollo program that are worth reading


    On a completely different note, Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History podcast series on World War I runs almost 24 hours and it is pure gold. I never really understood how the heck this war kicked off from some random archduke’s assassination until this. It’s really good listening for in the car, mowing the lawn, etc. I’ve found that I can’t listen to the words if I’m doing something mentally computationally intensive like working at work, working on my plane, etc. Non-verbal tasks work better because I can listen.

    If you’re in the US, reading the Federalist and Anti-Federalist papers in parallel can be very enlightening.
     
  18. Jul 11, 2019 #38

    Pops

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    Yes- Federalist and Anti-Federalist papers.
     
  19. Jul 13, 2019 #39

    Richard6

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    I haven't read the book, but during my time of service in the US Navy, I was stationed in Iceland and my job was to track Russian submarines, This was during the early 60's. At the time, the Navy and NSA were rather successful in tracking and locating the Russian subs. At that time, the subs had to surface on a regular procedure to recharge their battery's. When on the surface, they would often transmit their location, direction of travel and other pertinent information.

    My job was to get a directional bearing on the radio signal, and with the help of other US Navy sites, we could zero in on the location of the sub.

    Richard
     
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  20. Jul 14, 2019 #40

    BJC

    BJC

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    I’ll bet them you would enjoy the book.


    BJC
     

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