Holes in Spoiler or Not

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proppastie

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"If my student doesn't eventually surpass my abilities, then I failed as an instructor."
You are too nice....in order to be in the "Grumpy Old Mans Club" you have the say "in the good old days we did it like this" or perhaps if you are really grumpy "you will never be as good as I was."....I look at what some of the kids are doing, and I wounder "was I that smart when I was that age?"
 

Hot Wings

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You are too nice....in order to be in the "Grumpy Old Mans Club"
<< >>
and I wounder "was I that smart when I was that age?"
The wife wouldn't agree at the moment. I just finished making denigrating remarks about her companies odd and dysfunctional collection of software for remote access. Their IT guy is swamped so she asks me "How do I do this?"................I'm learning to say "I don't know".
<< >>
I did go back to college full time a couple of years ago and it does seem like the bright kids are smarter than they were in years past. I often wonder where I would be If I had the internet back in junior high when my brain was still able to soak up things quicker?

The average college student today? From what I saw we have slid back a long way, That observation applies to the academic staff as well. So my "Grumpy old dude" tag is still valid. 😒
 

BJC

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The average college student today? From what I saw we have slid back a long way,
They know lots of things, but different from the things I had to learn in high school and college.

Do they still have to learn all the math, or just how to use software to solve math problems?


BJC
 

Hot Wings

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Do they still have to learn all the math, or just how to use software to solve math problems?
Being around the engineering students, which numbered around 1.7% of the student body, my observations may be a bit biased:

I was there to brush up on my math that had atrophied for 30 years. One instructor couldn't prove that an integral over X to Y was the same as the negative from Y to X. She was head of the department (politics) and had taught the same set of classes so long she was on autopilot. My other math class? One of the best I've ever had. The instructor understood the math, and could lead a student down the correct path with little effort - or so it seamed.

I had to learn how to use a graphing calculator. I still don't think they are all that useful. Way back in high school we learned how to graph a function using the calculus we were learning. I think it really helped with the understanding.

The average physics class (not physics for non-majors which is pretty much a joke) is far more math intense than when I originally took it. If you didn't have a good understanding of calc up to differential equations you probably struggled. Same with the basic engineering classes. You might get to cheat a bit by using the TI to do an occasional derivative to make things faster but if you couldn't do it with paper and pencil you probably wouldn't pass the tests. Online homework? That is up to the integrity of the student.

We did have software in circuits class, but there again it didn't help any on the tests.

The average college student at my local college? They have problems understanding compound interest. :( I know I have the benefit of years of experience but I really think the bell curve of the modern student has a list to it's axis.
 

proppastie

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'Pastie, also look into the slot and roller method, which may be easier to build and install than the over center device.
Nice....spoilers already built, load tested, and almost finished install except for actuation. See build log posts 158 and 159 for build and load test. Will mount more in my log in a few days. Working on final design of revised over center of post 57 this thread.
 
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autoreply

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I've flown a sailplane with taped-off holes in the drag brakes once. Absolutely horrific, it hunts and feels almost uncontrollable (wash hitting the tail I guess). Notably rudder effectiveness went down from oversized to vague and insufficient.

Also had the caps pop open once (VNE low pass and a 3G pull-up on an old airframe. It's interesting hitting the brakes at 10 ft and VNE when you desperately want to go up...
 

8davebarker

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MY Last plane was a Mooney 231 ( turbocharger) it was equipped with dive brakes consisting of pair of ~ 5"X 6" aluminum plates that rotate up out of the wing. They were full of large 1" holes. Raising the dive brakes was like throwing out an anchor. Airspeed dropped immediately. They were a great ego saver in reducing a botched approach.
 

proppastie

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They were a great ego saver in reducing a botched approach.
Those are slick,,,,I programed my gps for vertical navigation (Vnav profile) at 500 ft/min, 5 mi. from the target and 1000 feet above the target. My E has a lower gear speed and 5 miles gives me time to level off and slow up to gear speed. I was slipping until I read D Maxwell was finding smoking rivets on the V stab. Unlike the Mooney the gilders I flew were difficult to land without a spoiler, and like a Mooney a little too fast you easily could end up off the end of the runway if not using the spoilers in the Glider...

Did you land with the Spoilers deployed in the Mooney? Or did you stow them to land ?
 

gibran.cas

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Hello folks I have a question: the location of spoiler does need to be out of a wing stall region?

and what book or article can you recommend me to read about this topic.

tnx for reading :)
 

proppastie

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Hello folks I have a question: the location of spoiler does need to be out of a wing stall region?

and what book or article can you recommend me to read about this topic.

tnx for reading :)
I copied the location from another glider.......FAA Glider Criteria.....Frati "The Glider"

Post 20 has a reference.
 

Bill-Higdon

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As a side note hear in the YO-3 Quiet Star had a accidental asymmetrical partial deployment of a spoiler which resulted in a aircraft crashing at Hunter Liggett
 

Victor Bravo

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So how big should I make the holes?
This is SWAG without the S. Just gut feel from an old model builder, but I would do what I am suggesting and go fly it myself without any worry. You can always enlarge or plug the holes later.

I'd put two 1.5" diameter holes in each "bay" of the spoiler between the stiffeners. Center the holes as much as possible within each of those rectangles, and flange (flare) the edges of the holes for added stiffness.

There are guys here who can do 20 pages of math and come up with a different answer of course. But I'm close.
 
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