HERO ULTRALIGHT

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philr

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Dec 26, 2020
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I made some changes to the landing gear after noticing how the TYRO MK2 had no bend in the axel but just goes out at a 12 degree angle and the wheel is just canted inward that much. Easier to build stronger and seems to work. I also slapped a wind shield on and closed in the front to see how it looks.
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philr

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Dec 26, 2020
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64
I mentioned earlier in the thread that my inspiration for this project is the Eastwood Tyro Mk II and the Legal Eagle XL. The Tyro landing gear & strut attach is like this. The landing gear is light and tough enough for off airport landings. I don't show the bungee wrap on my drawing but here are pics of the Tyro. The Eagle XL inspiration is a welded 4130 fuse and the seat that Milholland uses on his designs.
image (1).pngimage (2).png
 

philr

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The Hero airfoil is the same airfoil used for the Bearhawk lsa
The Bearhawk LSA uses the same airfoil but different thickness at 13.5% . Riblett 30-613.5 -I am sure it behaves similar however at 15% thick stall is at higher angle of attack although the charts don't actually show a stall at over 20 degrees AOA it looks like more of a "mush" if thats a word?
 

TLAR

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Philr

Thank you for sharing your design.
I have enjoyed watching it mature.
 

philr

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Dec 26, 2020
Messages
64
Philr

Thank you for sharing your design.
I have enjoyed watching it mature.
I enjoy all the input. I am certain it will be a better aircraft due to input from people on this forum. Thank you!
 

philr

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Dec 26, 2020
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UPDATE: I had 3 friends who are A&P's look at the design and so far got good reactions to the design they were impressed with Hero because I am using known materials which are used in lots of certified aircraft. I have an friend with engineering background analyzing structure on the Hero he is doing this for free so I hope you all can wait! Also working on an engine 35hp 4 stroke but it is very experimental yet. The weights I am calculating show that a 1/2 vw should work but other candidates in the 80-95 lb range and over 30 hp may work. The torque tube for ailerons is getting turfed in favor of cables up to the wing then pushrod with bell crank in the wing. I can save about 6 lbs and the torque tubes are not worth it also there was the control connections from the stick to the torque tubes that started to look like comedy. I know some of you told me that earlier...LOL but some of us gotta try it first to see if its a good idea.
 

David L. Downey

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Aug 7, 2019
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113
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Harleysville, PA
I am loving this!
did I miss the earlier note that explains the use of 2024T3 rather than 6061T6? Is it simply for the lower weight at same strength? what is the weight of the added corrosion treatment on the 2024T3?
really looking forward to the stress conclusion on the main spar. those caps look pretty insubstantial!
 

philr

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Dec 26, 2020
Messages
64
I am loving this!
did I miss the earlier note that explains the use of 2024T3 rather than 6061T6? Is it simply for the lower weight at same strength? what is the weight of the added corrosion treatment on the 2024T3?
really looking forward to the stress conclusion on the main spar. those caps look pretty insubstantial!
The choice of alloy was due to input from a member here that is from overseas new Zealand or Australia I think. 6061 T6 is not as easy to buy there so I did some checking and it seems 2024T3 is more widely available no real price difference and somewhat higher hardness I think. I cant remember his handle right now but he gave me lots of info on wings he designed and flew. I really want anyone anywhere to be able to build this aircraft. Hero should be fairly inexpensive. I am not choosing the easiest way but rather time tested materials which should last a lifetime with some attention to detail.
 
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rotax618

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Oct 31, 2005
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I don’t wish to be a spoilsport but you are trying to make a simple aeroplane about as complicated to build as you can, not many have the equipment or ability to successfully weld a space frame and to make it distortion free requires the construction of a complicated jig.
If you are trying to build a simple cheap Single seater there a plenty of examples.
A10EB78E-10CF-421A-A3C8-7E1C286D311C.jpeg
 

philr

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Dec 26, 2020
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I don’t wish to be a spoilsport but you are trying to make a simple aeroplane about as complicated to build as you can, not many have the equipment or ability to successfully weld a space frame and to make it distortion free requires the construction of a complicated jig.
If you are trying to build a simple cheap Single seater there a plenty of examples.
View attachment 113633
You are, I am certain, correct in your statement and that is a good example in the picture. Where are the plans for the bush cocky? Are the materials available? Hero is my taste and my choice of materials based on my background. I grew up as a missionary kid on a fly-in only Indian reservation 180 miles north of the closest hick town. The planes I grew up riding in were built of these materials and were already 50 years old, some of them, by the time I was born and are still flying today 50 years later. How many years was Bush Cocky built by other builders? What will bush cocky look like when it is 100 years old?
You did miss some of the design parameters that I am shooting for.
1. Part 103 Ultralight.
2. 4 stroke power.
3. Materials used available anywhere and will be for the for-see-able future.
4. Strong as possible while meeting part 103.
5. Full tube cage around pilot for protection if there was an accident.
6. Scratch built with OPEN SOURCE plans.
7. Float attach ready as I am a seaplane nut.
I will be waiting for your list of designs that meet my objectives....
Aviation history is littered with great designs and I used some for ideas on my design as others have on their designs. How many designs have lasted 20 years and are actively being built? So many try to run a business in Aviation by designing and selling airplanes and then go broke taking a good design with them. Open Source is the answer.
Welding is something anyone could learn. Welding a reasonably straight fuse isn't too hard and with youtube there are lots of good videos on the subject and EAA has books and other resources.
Look at the success of the Legal Eagle with a welded fuse. If you cant weld and don't want to learn ok.. you can find someone to build it for you I am sure.
This is by no means as complicated as I could design. There are guys building ultralights and selling them that use carbon fiber this and that and they are struggling to meet part 103 with a Polini as the motor. To me that is a failure. Tough to beat 4130 for strength and light weight.
I have plans of an airplane a ten year old boy drew and then built and flew that design and others did too. That is from a long time ago when boys knew more than most men ever learn to day due to a complete lack of common sense.
I don't think you were being a spoil sport but you didn't know what I am designing too.
There is no one aeroplane that is for everyone.
 
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philr

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Dec 26, 2020
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64
This...Lets all get busy and build something.
I appreciate that very much, thank you for the kind words.

I first started welding around age 10 I think but it was pretty hack. In those days I hung out with street rod guys who taught me how to chop tops, lead panels and just get it done. As I aged I just kept at it. All of those guys are dead now except 2 of them, both are mid 80’s.

When I graduated I could could fabricate ok but wanted more. I became a plumber and hold a masters license but during that time I went to multiple schools to learn welding and end up welding gas lines and air switches in power plants.

When I started getting involved with aviation I immediately was asked to repair a few things for the flying guys.

That lead to welding fuselages and tail sections etc. I’ve welding on various certified airplanes as well as a host of homebuilts. It’s been a fun ride these last 30+ years but it’s very sad to see many of these guys go, they really kept me going. Nowadays I have nobody to push me and it gets lonely at times. I have such great memories though and that kinda pushes me.

I’m convinced anyone can learn welding and be very good at it in short order if they practice with intent. It’s been my experience that to truly be good at this you must enjoy it, which is to say you are a volunteer and not doing it because you feel you must. It’s very enjoyable when approached with the right attitude.

I get asked often about gas vs TIG and I always chuckle. People get so hung up on this when they should be welding instead. Just pick one and get busy, both are fine and both work.

The missing ingredient will always be action. Just do it and do it often. I had a old friend teach me that, he died of MS and was in Rodding Journal and in the drag race hall of fame. Dick had MS so bad he would crawl on the floor to get tools and work on his last project, a 34 Ford street rod….all steel. He taught me to lead panels. I never could complain while working with him because it would be cowardly. Now that he’s gone I view the world like him, I see so many people talking and not doing. Dick would yell and scream at me all the time. “Stop Fuc$&@ around and get busy Mikey”. He left me his vise in his will. It’s all broken up and welded up, looks like crap but it’s pretty bad ass. I use it all the time. God I miss him yelling at me. He was like my second father. The guy had no quit I’m him. I mean, he had MS so bad his legs were just rubber and he could out work anyone. His kids hated him, I loved him. So, when you see those videos think of guys like that, not me, I was just a young punk kid who paid attention when nobody else would.
 

rotax618

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Oct 31, 2005
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Location
Evans Head Australia
Please don’t think that my comments refer to design, I should have kept my thoughts to myself. You design is very good, it is just that I have seen many single seat lightweight airplanes with a high mounted engine that would probably be simpler to build and therefore would encourage more builders.
The Bush Cocky is not a great example, it used aluminium extrusions that are freely available here in Australia, but maybe nowhere else - it also was welded.
This basic airframe is a better example, and if fitted with a light plywood pilot enclosure and windscreen would be a better example of simplicity.
411696AD-A148-4757-983F-203B5ABA9E91.jpeg
 

philr

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Dec 26, 2020
Messages
64
Please don’t think that my comments refer to design, I should have kept my thoughts to myself. You design is very good, it is just that I have seen many single seat lightweight airplanes with a high mounted engine that would probably be simpler to build and therefore would encourage more builders.
The Bush Cocky is not a great example, it used aluminium extrusions that are freely available here in Australia, but maybe nowhere else - it also was welded.
This basic airframe is a better example, and if fitted with a light plywood pilot enclosure and windscreen would be a better example of simplicity.
View attachment 113672
I think that type appeals to lots of people for myself though looking at it I think I just saw a Quicksilver for $2500 so why build that. I want as close as I can get to a "real airplane" within part 103 and I am willing to put in over 500 hours to build it. That design is maybe 200 plus hours to build maybe less but I don't really want it so I wont build it. Not saying its a bad ultralight but definitely not my taste.
 
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