Heath Parasol on floats

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Fullmetalwelder

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Hi! While I was doing some researches about the heath parasol I found out a race(?) one that was provided with floats
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It looks like a regular parasol with very boxy looking floats, I've done some researches and found out that the one in this photo had a "standard" heath-henderson engine with 27hp,
It's really possible to take off with this little horsepowers? I know that overral the parasol is kinda light but I think that 27hp aren't enough to take off from water since the friction between the surface of the floats and the water is very high, am I right?
1660150717141.png
This is the page of the article that talks about the parasol, I'm kinda new to aviation and I'm trying to learn as much as possible about seaplanes, so I may be wrong and the hp are more than enough...
 

addaon

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The floats seem to have a standard step geometry. Might take a moment when underpowered to get up on step, but once you do drag is pretty moderate. Probably was pretty underpowered, but no reason to doubt it flew.
 

Dana

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27HP sounds pretty marginal and I question the quoted 600fpm climb and 300# useful load, but remember the original E-2 Taylor Cub carried two people and had only 40HP.

One thing in the article I found interesting is "two inch vent pipes feed each step". I never heard of anything like that before.
 

Fullmetalwelder

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27HP sounds pretty marginal and I question the quoted 600fpm climb and 300# useful load, but remember the original E-2 Taylor Cub carried two people and had only 40HP.

One thing in the article I found interesting is "two inch vent pipes feed each step". I never heard of anything like that before.
I also couldn't find out what vent pipes were but I tought it was just me not being able to understand, since english is not my first lenguage and I don't know a lot of aeronatuics terms in english
 

addaon

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Some of the NACA papers have info on vents… maybe 236 (sorry, going from memory here, likely wrong), and some of the post-war collections I think?
 

Fullmetalwelder

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The floats seem to have a standard step geometry. Might take a moment when underpowered to get up on step, but once you do drag is pretty moderate. Probably was pretty underpowered, but no reason to doubt it flew.
Got it, still to me the specs looks pretty suspiscius, I mean, the plane itself weight about 150kg, and the useful load is 130kg?
 

Riggerrob

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I also couldn't find out what vent pipes were but I tought it was just me not being able to understand, since english is not my first lenguage and I don't know a lot of aeronatuics terms in english
Steps' primary function is to break the suction created between the curved hull and the water. Steps first gained popularity among drug smugglers (tobacco and alcohol) during the American Prohibition of the 1920s and 1930s. Fast "cigarette" boats brought drugs ashore from larger ships waiting just beyond the 12 mile limit.
Step pipes allow air to get sucked in behind the step, further reducing suction.
Step vent pipes are available as an after-market STC for Republic RC-3 Seabee small flying boat.
Grumman Mallard also has large vent pipes connecting its main wheel wells to its step. I suspect that their primary function is to drain water from the wheel wells.

Those flat-bottomed floats work well at the low take-off speeds of World War 1 and Depression era airplanes, but pound too much in large waves. That is why 1920s and later seaplanes have V-hulls. V-hulls help reduce slamming when they hit waves.
 

Fullmetalwelder

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Steps' primary function is to break the suction created between the curved hull and the water. Steps first gained popularity among drug smugglers (tobacco and alcohol) during the American Prohibition of the 1920s and 1930s. Fast "cigarette" boats brought drugs ashore from larger ships waiting just beyond the 12 mile limit.
Step pipes allow air to get sucked in behind the step, further reducing suction.
Step vent pipes are available as an after-market STC for Republic RC-3 Seabee small flying boat.
Grumman Mallard also has large vent pipes connecting its main wheel wells to its step. I suspect that their primary function is to drain water from the wheel wells.

Those flat-bottomed floats work well at the low take-off speeds of World War 1 and Depression era airplanes, but pound too much in large waves. That is why 1920s and later seaplanes have V-hulls. V-hulls help reduce slamming when they hit waves.
So basically the vents and pipes connect the bottom part of the float, where is the step, to the bottom part? Or is like a side to side connection? I can't find an image online
 

flitzerpilot

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The air enters the pipes (frequently dual pipes) and aerates the water at the step, reducing friction, ie. reduces meniscal adhesion and this assists lift-off. The floatplane version of the Flitzer Goblin was drawn with both 'v' and rectangular section floats, both equipped with vent pipes, but currently only land plane Goblins are under construction.
 

ianlaw121212

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There's a nice in flight photo of a slick looking Heath Parasol with floats in an EAA magazine. So far I haven't been able to track it down online but if I do find it, I'll post the photo - with acknowledgements to EAA of course.

Many years ago I knew an old gentleman in Polperro, in Cornwall who flew Camels in WW1. One of the many aeroplanes he owned between the wars was a Heath Parasol. He liked it a lot. When he wasn't flying, he was a works rider for Norton Motorcycles.
 

flitzerpilot

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For ref, here are two Goblin images of the Wasserkobold showing the floats, v-form and rectangular, only the latter shown with pipe vents. Before its demise, the Bell-Aeromarine Co., had commenced construction of their second Flitzer Z-1, intended to be completed as a floatplane for the London Boat Show. The proven performance of the Z-1 with the 1834cc VW installed gave impetus to the floatplane option. Although the Goblin is slightly smaller than the Z-1, its projected light weight is a bonus. Note the extended underfin which was intended to bolt onto the external 'skeg' which carries the skid arm on the landplane version and the deeper rudder extension of the floatplane.
 

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Fullmetalwelder

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For ref, here are two Goblin images of the Wasserkobold showing the floats, v-form and rectangular, only the latter shown with pipe vents. Before its demise, the Bell-Aeromarine Co., had commenced construction of their second Flitzer Z-1, intended to be completed as a floatplane for the London Boat Show. The proven performance of the Z-1 with the 1834cc VW installed gave impetus to the floatplane option. Although the Goblin is slightly smaller than the Z-1, its projected light weight is a bonus. Note the extended underfin which was intended to bolt onto the external 'skeg' which carries the skid arm on the landplane version and the deeper rudder extension of the floatplane.
Ok I got this, I wonder If for a low powered plane it would be better to have flat bottomed floats or v shaped ones
 

Fullmetalwelder

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There's a nice in flight photo of a slick looking Heath Parasol with floats in an EAA magazine. So far I haven't been able to track it down online but if I do find it, I'll post the photo - with acknowledgements to EAA of course.

Many years ago I knew an old gentleman in Polperro, in Cornwall who flew Camels in WW1. One of the many aeroplanes he owned between the wars was a Heath Parasol. He liked it a lot. When he wasn't flying, he was a works rider for Norton Motorcycles.
So now I know for sure that they can actually take of from water ahah, maybe with a little struggle.
Now I can buy some plans and start building myself a seaplane parasol!
 

Fullmetalwelder

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