Green Sky Adventures or GSATech?

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swpearce

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Jan 25, 2021
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Hello from Tallahassee, Fl.

Brand new to this forum. Plans building an ISON/TEAM Tandem Airbike with an HKS 700E 4 stroke engine.... for the last ten years.... I know and am suitably ashamed.
I've been a forum member of the East Tennessee Lonesome Buzzards, catering to ISON/TEAM kit builders for several years.

Never the less I'm poised to mount the HKS on the airframe after sitting pickled for the last six years in my temperature controlled shop.
The engine is a second hand 2003 revision that came out of a kitfox with 50+ hours on the engine from new.
The seller was unknown to me, but appeared to be an honest EAA aviation enthusiast and I took his word at face value after a brief inspection of the engine on the plane.

Before trying to crank the HKS mounted on the Airbike I thought I'd get Green Sky Adventure / GSATech in Hamilton, Fl. to inspect and overhaul as necessary, being an HKS distributor close to my home. Seems they've fallen off the map. No response to phone or email inquiries. Possibly a Covid shutdown, but I don't know.

Which brings me to my main question.... does any member know if Green Sky/GSATech is still a viable company or any way to contact Jim Olenik?
Barring that, do any members know of an HKS service/parts sources in the United Sates?

Appreciate any input you can provide... aside from abandoning the HKS. I considered the plans approved Rotax and the four stroke Hirth.
The HKS was too good to pass up, or so it seemed at the time.

Thanks,
Steve Pearce
 

Victor Bravo

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I had the HKS 700 engine on a Kolb and flew it several times. Although I only put five or eight hours on the engine, including flight and ground taxi time, it ran as advertised. The one thing I suggest strongly is to have a knowledgeable person come and balance the carburetors. Another thing is to make sure you have a little too much oil cooling capacity. Apparently the engine is sensitive to oil temp, and you never want to be at the limit of the cooling capacity. So use the larger oil cooler, and block some of it off as needed. Because I sold the airplane and engine, I never got enough experience with it to have any deeper understanding of it. But if it meets the engine weight and power requirements of your airframe, it will be a good powerplant. The "word on the street" is that it is about halfway between the 503 and 582 in real-world power/thrust.
 

swpearce

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Jan 25, 2021
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I had the HKS 700 engine on a Kolb and flew it several times. Although I only put five or eight hours on the engine, including flight and ground taxi time, it ran as advertised. The one thing I suggest strongly is to have a knowledgeable person come and balance the carburetors. Another thing is to make sure you have a little too much oil cooling capacity. Apparently the engine is sensitive to oil temp, and you never want to be at the limit of the cooling capacity. So use the larger oil cooler, and block some of it off as needed. Because I sold the airplane and engine, I never got enough experience with it to have any deeper understanding of it. But if it meets the engine weight and power requirements of your airframe, it will be a good powerplant. The "word on the street" is that it is about halfway between the 503 and 582 in real-world power/thrust.
Thanks for the info. I committed to the HKS because it presented itself to me without any effort on my part during the build. Seems I've got an orphan now in the event of needing parts or a rebuild. c'est la vie!

Steve
 

Victor Bravo

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It's a good enough engine to keep, and fly. Depending onw here you are in the world, there are a few people who know what they're doing with those engines. If you are anywhere near the Los Angeles area I can hook you up with the guy who balanced my carburetors, and knows the engines reasonably well.
 

Pops

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Friend of mine had a HKS in a Sky-Rader He liked the engine.
 

swpearce

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Jan 25, 2021
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I don't think I could possibly be further away from you and still be in the USA. I'm in North Florida, but thanks for the tip on service. The reason I'd hoped Green Sky was still a viable entity was it's close proximity to where I live. Jerry Olenik passed away in 2018, however his son Jim, a certified Rotax mechanic, took over Green Sky. I think HKS's withdrawal form the market and Covid probably killed Green Sky.
 

Jim Chuk

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Mar 30, 2013
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Chisholm Mn USA
The HKS seems to be a nice engine for an Airbike. I had an HKS, but sold it with the project I was going to put it on. Syncing the carbs should be fairly simple. I use a single vacuum gauge with a T in the line going from it, then a 1/4 turn snowmobile type fuel valve in each line, then the lines go from valves to vacuum ports on the carbs. Open one valve at a time to see what vacuum is being drawn at each carburator, then adjust the throttle linkage so the vacuum readings are the same on each carb. This is how I do it on my 912 Rotax powered kitfox, but the HKS uses the same carbs as the 912. There is an outfit up in New York state who sells HKS engines and parts. Google HKS aircraft engines and you should find them. If there is no corrosion in your engine, there may be no reason to overhaul it. They were made to last a long time. I've been a member of the Lonesome Buzzards for close to 20 years, used to fly a Himax, but moved on to bigger planes, and hardly ever go back on the site. JImChuk
 

swpearce

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Jan 25, 2021
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edited for brevity

Syncing the carbs should be fairly simple. ...
... but the HKS uses the same carbs as the 912.
There is an outfit up in New York state who sells HKS engines and parts.
I've been a member of the Lonesome Buzzards for close to 20 years, used to fly a Himax, but moved on to bigger planes, and hardly ever go back on the site. JImChuk
Jim,
Thanks for the HKS info. Sadly the former North American HKS distributor in New York state has stated that HKS has withdrawn from the aviation market entirely after poor sales of their model 700Turbo in 2017. They pulled out in late 2019 with no plans to return. Existing complete engines and new parts are scarce and no one wants to inspect an engine if necessary parts aren't available. ie valve guides, pistons, crank, cam, etc.

However you did offer some valuable info regarding the carbs. I'll probably need two rebuild kits and if I can get them from Rotax for the 912 model that would be beneficial.

Regarding carb syncing. I have a fancy multi tube hydro-manometer that I'm comfortable using if it can be adapted to the HKS system. I've used that manometer to sync the multiple carbs on various motorcycles I've owned over the years. I can't see how the HKS would be very different if the fittings can be adapted. It allows syncing multiple carbs simultaneously.

I've been a lurker on the buzzard site for nearly ten years, contributing little, but learning alot. I helped a fellow in our EAA chapter build an all wood Minimax years ago. It suffered an off field landing when the Hirth engine seized. Pilot sustained no injury, landing in cow pasture. The Minimax suffered a broken spar and separated undercarriage in the process. The owner is now building an RV-8. Can't keep a good pilot down!

Thanks again for your input.

Steve Pearce
 

Jim Chuk

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Mar 30, 2013
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134
Location
Chisholm Mn USA
The bing carbs used on the HKS were used in BMW motorcycles to start with. If you can sync carbs on a motor cycle, you should have no problem with the HKS carbs. A guy who I know and who is rebuilding a set of 912 carbs for me says the diaphrams in those carbs last a long time. He doesn't replace them unless they show damage. Also, Rotax has had issues with newer floats, your old ones may be better. Those are the two most expensive parts in a carb overhaul. JImChuk
 
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