Folding Wings, Aircraft Trailers, and Portable Hangars for Inexpensive Storage

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haiqu

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Mar 29, 2011
Messages
274
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Australia & New Zealand
I just bought this airplane in New Zealand for peanuts, trailer included. It's a homebuilt and apparantly also a prototype. No documentation and no idea of the designer/builder. The rego on the tail is fake, never been registered. The engine is a Rotax 447 with low hours. Needs ASI, compass, paint, wing skin repairs and a good cleanup.

ID plate says it's a "Rainbow Chaser" S/N 001 built in 2005

microlighth.jpgmicrolight1.jpgmicrolight2.jpgmicrolight4.jpg

Should look nice in my garage. :)
 
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J.L. Frusha

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Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
121
Location
Kingsbury, Texas
I just bought this airplane in New Zealand for peanuts, trailer included. It's a homebuilt and apparantly also a prototype. No documentation and no idea of the designer/builder. The rego on the tail is fake, never been registered. The engine is a Rotax 447 with low hours. Needs ASI, compass, paint, wing skin repairs and a good cleanup.

ID plate says it's a "Rainbow Chaser" S/N 001 built in 2005


Should look nice in my garage. :)
Might start with the SAA, there in New Zealand. Should be some info. and documentation. The U.K. has a lot of regulations on documentation that we don't have, here in the USA.

Here's a link:
Home-Build and Fly your aircraft with support from SAA | Sport Aircraft Association New Zealand Inc
 

haiqu

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2011
Messages
274
Location
Australia & New Zealand
Might start with the SAA, there in New Zealand. Should be some info. and documentation. The U.K. has a lot of regulations on documentation that we don't have, here in the USA.

Here's a link:
Home-Build and Fly your aircraft with support from SAA | Sport Aircraft Association New Zealand Inc
Being a microlight it's unlikely they will know of the aircraft. The SAA in Australia and NZ deal with aircraft that are likely to be registered for flying by pilots with a full PPL. Microlight fliers come under a different set of rules and usually train for a certificate under the Recreational Aircraft Association. http://raanz.org.nz/wiki/pmwiki.php

The main differences are restriction to daylight flying, relaxed medical requirements and no controlled airspace, IFR or aerobatics. It's essentially a way for the average guy to get into flying, in the absence of an equivalent to FAR 103.

There's also a long trend in NZ of "own design" aircraft based on what we Aussies would call "eyeball engineering". I think the US term for that is TLAR Design (That Looks About Right). This thing probably didn't ever have paperwork ... and yet in NZ - bless her socks - I can register and fly it!
 

haiqu

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Joined
Mar 29, 2011
Messages
274
Location
Australia & New Zealand
MVP.Aero - Home of the MVP Light Sport Aircraft

=interesting \TRIPHIBIAN,folding wings...\!
I'll be waiting until they've actually built one and flown it. With all those "features" it will undoubtedly be heavy and slow.

Interesting concept, but I suspect that it will not perform well as either a boat or an airplane, by the time you load it with guns and fishing gear and hammock and food and mooring lines and anchor and docking thrusters and house batteries and solar panels and ... well, you get the picture. And with all that movable/removable stuff it better have a wide CG range for safety.

Anyone can design something like this with a computer, and that's all they have achieved so far. Would you invest $100,000 in their pipe dream? If not you'll be waiting until 2017, and that's just for a kit of parts.
 
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henryk

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Mar 8, 2010
Messages
5,200
Location
krakow,poland
I'll be waiting until they've actually built one and flown it.

Anyone can design something like this with a computer, and that's all they have achieved so far. Would you invest $100,000 in their pipe dream? If not you'll be waiting until 2017, and that's just for a kit of parts.
=thats thru!

-but historical constructions was flying/roadable...=

HT-1 Road Wing

SFoD Tailless - Elevon Books
 

fly_boy_bc

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Joined
Aug 20, 2008
Messages
236
Location
Agssiz BC
Hey! Lookit what I got!



I purchased a 20x11 car storage tent after paying for 1/5th of a Fisher Super Koala in 2010. I was unable to cover the rest of the cost of the SK due to the economy tanking (See my short thread on the subject) and so I sold the shelter. I ended up purchasing the 101 in 2012 and it has lived on my covered and enclosed porch ever since. There is precious little space to actually work on the plane on the porch so I knew I needed to buy another shelter.

This one is HUGE! It is meant to be a boat or RV shelter and measures 26x14 feet! The 101 with no cowl or engine mount and with the tail removed is only 13 feet long and each wing is also 13 feet. I can't believe how much room there is to work in here! It's amazing! Since the walls are nearly vertical the whole space is usable as opposed to those dome shaped shelters where the outside 3 feet on both sides are only good for storing short items on the floor. With this shelter I can have the fuse and both wings out in open area, able to walk around them and get to every side and I STILL have room left over for for a biggish work table and all of my woodworking tools/machines with their own bench and storage for stock.

Biggest shop I have ever had and you have to love the skylight! It came with the fluorescent lighting and wiring/switches as well! Can you believe that I only paid $200.00?



I brought it home yesterday and the seller is going to deliver the wooden "foundation" (10-6x6's) sometime in the next couple of weeks. I have a lot of work to do clearing the space where it is going to be set up, leveling the yard and setting up this monster. I hope that this project time stolen from the plane this summer will be repaid by a longer and more productive building season that lasts farther into the winter. I won't try to keep a tent "heated" but I will try to keep it unfrozen with a small electric heater all winter. That way I might not have to remove any snow to keep it from collapsing and I should be able to work on the plane in a jacket at least until the real cold sets in.
 

fly_boy_bc

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Joined
Aug 20, 2008
Messages
236
Location
Agssiz BC
It's really very simple to make these units last a lot longer.

1...The whole structure should be mounted on beams, think "foundation" 4x4 at LEAST, 6x6 is better. The beams should be stabilized by stakes driven beside them to prevent the structure from shifting in the wind.
2...Seal all gaps. If the wind get's "inside" the tent will pop like a balloon.
3...STAKES...Lots and lots of STAKES. LONG stakes driven DEEP at 45 degrees.
4...All panels between posts can be reenforced with cables or rope or even plywood. Don't forget the roof too for snow load issues.
5...TIGHT cables joining corners stiffen the structure nicely.
6...REMOVE ALL SNOW, ALL OF THE TIME...AS FREQUENTLY AS POSSIBLE DURING SNOWFALLS. Don't let the snow pile up against the sides either! That will cause your tent to become a lean-to. (not good)
7...This is the one people don't think of. SHADE the unit with tarps BEFORE it becomes UV damaged. Tarps are cheap while your envelope is not. Let the TARP absorb all that damaging UV and get replaced every 3-6 years while leaving a nearly perfect envelope! Most people wait until the envelope is UV damaged before doing this simple thing.
My unit (26x14 Costco with skylight) is to be installed right next to my house and will be shaded from the wind and sun on two sides (back and 1/2 of the right side) by the house and the rest will have either a tarp directly on the surface of the envelope or will be shaded from above by another tarp. I will remove the tarps in the fall after the UV index is reasonable and the wind is more likely to be an issue and put them back up in the spring when UV protection is most important. I expect this unit to last 20 years or more with this treatment. My structure has a raised floor, fluorescent lighting and is heated and ventilated.

When the envelope finally packs it in I will simply replace it with tarps. Not a lot of work, cheap, simple and no worse looking than any blank windowless envelope.
 

Dana

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Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,195
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CT, USA
I seriously doubt a "small electric heater" will be enough to melt snow off the roof of one of those things; in a heavy snow it will accumulate far faster than you can melt it even with a salamander. I had one collapse in the heavy snow we had here a few years ago. If you have room to brace the peak of the roof straight down to the floor it will support a lot more snow load, though it will still sag between the rafters.

Dana
 

Rienk

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Joined
Oct 11, 2008
Messages
1,364
Location
Santa Maria, CA (SMX)
It's really very simple to make these units last a lot longer.

7...This is the one people don't think of. SHADE the unit with tarps BEFORE it becomes UV damaged. Tarps are cheap while your envelope is not. Let the TARP absorb all that damaging UV and get replaced every 3-6 years while leaving a nearly perfect envelope! Most people wait until the envelope is UV damaged before doing this simple thing.
When the envelope finally packs it in I will simply replace it with tarps. Not a lot of work, cheap, simple and no worse looking than any blank windowless envelope.
If you're going to cover it with a tarp, I assume you're not going to take advantage of the skylights?
Seems a shame, but whatever works!
 

pictsidhe

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Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
7,418
Location
North Carolina
It's really very simple to make these units last a lot longer.

1...The whole structure should be mounted on beams, think "foundation" 4x4 at LEAST, 6x6 is better. The beams should be stabilized by stakes driven beside them to prevent the structure from shifting in the wind.
2...Seal all gaps. If the wind get's "inside" the tent will pop like a balloon.
3...STAKES...Lots and lots of STAKES. LONG stakes driven DEEP at 45 degrees.
4...All panels between posts can be reenforced with cables or rope or even plywood. Don't forget the roof too for snow load issues.
5...TIGHT cables joining corners stiffen the structure nicely.
6...REMOVE ALL SNOW, ALL OF THE TIME...AS FREQUENTLY AS POSSIBLE DURING SNOWFALLS. Don't let the snow pile up against the sides either! That will cause your tent to become a lean-to. (not good)
7...This is the one people don't think of. SHADE the unit with tarps BEFORE it becomes UV damaged. Tarps are cheap while your envelope is not. Let the TARP absorb all that damaging UV and get replaced every 3-6 years while leaving a nearly perfect envelope! Most people wait until the envelope is UV damaged before doing this simple thing.
My unit (26x14 Costco with skylight) is to be installed right next to my house and will be shaded from the wind and sun on two sides (back and 1/2 of the right side) by the house and the rest will have either a tarp directly on the surface of the envelope or will be shaded from above by another tarp. I will remove the tarps in the fall after the UV index is reasonable and the wind is more likely to be an issue and put them back up in the spring when UV protection is most important. I expect this unit to last 20 years or more with this treatment. My structure has a raised floor, fluorescent lighting and is heated and ventilated.

When the envelope finally packs it in I will simply replace it with tarps. Not a lot of work, cheap, simple and no worse looking than any blank windowless envelope.
For removing snow, thats the uv sacrifical tarp that you pull back and fore across the roof
 

Aesquire

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Joined
Jul 28, 2014
Messages
2,402
Location
Rochester, NY, USA
I have a lot of experience using those camping. All the above advice is good. Ropes from each joint to the ground, at an angle to the next pole over's base, to triangulate the support on each and every panel you are not using as a door is vital. Those things can fly, and as they flip and thrash like a giant insect in it's death throes, the poles will spear through every expensive thing in sight, and a few over the horizon too. ( I've also seen dust devils lift a 9x9 dome tent and send it flying for over a mile, and not empty, either. )

spiral stakes used for "pet tie outs" from Tractor Supply or other dealers work very good.

That said, it's cheap weather protection, and tarps over the stock envelope are a good idea.
 

fly_boy_bc

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Joined
Aug 20, 2008
Messages
236
Location
Agssiz BC
I seriously doubt a "small electric heater" will be enough to melt snow off the roof of one of those things; in a heavy snow it will accumulate far faster than you can melt it even with a salamander. I had one collapse in the heavy snow we had here a few years ago. If you have room to brace the peak of the roof straight down to the floor it will support a lot more snow load, though it will still sag between the rafters.

Dana
The intention of the heater is not to melt all of the snow it is to create a water layer under the snow which will act like a shear line and allow the snow to slide off like an avalanche. It's similar to carb heat, you dont have to prevent the ice from forming or melt it after it has formed you just have to prevent if from adhering to any part of the carb throat which takes far less energy.

Besides "REMOVE ALL SNOW, ALL OF THE TIME...AS FREQUENTLY AS POSSIBLE DURING SNOWFALLS" and "All panels between posts can be reenforced with cables or rope or even plywood. Don't forget the roof too for snow load issues."

Since this is not a garage for a car I do indeed have room to support the peak from below as you suggest..Thanks Dana! Good idea!
 
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fly_boy_bc

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Joined
Aug 20, 2008
Messages
236
Location
Agssiz BC
If you're going to cover it with a tarp, I assume you're not going to take advantage of the skylights?
Seems a shame, but whatever works!
It is a bit of a shame which was not lost on me either. My intention is to cover the most sun exposed areas with tarp laid directly on the envelope which will block the skylights but I hope to shade the major portion of the unit from above. This will reduce the light coming in through the skylight but I am hoping I can leave enough light coming in to be useful and still protect the envelope. As in all things in life this is an excercise in compromises.
 
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fly_boy_bc

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Joined
Aug 20, 2008
Messages
236
Location
Agssiz BC
Ropes from each joint to the ground, at an angle to the next pole over's base, to triangulate the support on each and every panel you are not using as a door is vital. That said, it's cheap weather protection, and tarps over the stock envelope are a good idea.
This is basically what I meant to say when I wrote "All panels between posts can be
reenforced with cables or rope or even plywood. Don't forget the roof too for
snow load issues." and "TIGHT cables joining corners stiffen the structure
nicely." but your explanation is much clearer.

This big 26 foot long unit is built TOUGH. I had a 20x11 Hernois (SP?) dome shaped shelter that was NO comparison! The galvanized pipes and poles are really beefy and there is more structure to the rafters than any I have ever seen before! Even the current Costco equivalent unit which was obviously made by the same company has less structure up there, instead they went to cable bracing! I'm glad I bought used...I ended up with a better product!

Thank you all for your input!
Now I plan to support the peak as Dana suggested in addition to all of the above...


Any other ideas?
 

Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
6,983
Location
Rocky Mountains
Hi. What is the circled bit?
It's an aft hinge. It's purpose is to relieve torque on the main hinge while folding to prevent bending the load carrying fitting. I've seen some that are removable. The Dyke Delta and some Fleas uses similar.
 
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