Flying wing as cheap and simple option for basic fun flying.

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cluttonfred

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If I were you, I would have a serioeus look at the Stabiloplan (see attachment). It was flying really well, according to pilots of that era.
The Stabiloplan is very interesting especially considered in its era, but using wing incidence for pitch with no other horizontal surface is essentially weight shift control for pitch like an Easy Riser but using the whole fuselage rather than just the pilot. I could see using pilot weight shift in a very light Part 103 design where pilot weight is such a large influence, but it seems like an unnecessary complication for anything bigger when you could just use a control mixer and larger elevons instead.
 

Sockmonkey

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and if you set the fuselage on the wing?
Then it becomes a very different aircraft, and loses some of the advantages that were the reason I went with the low-aspect high-wing junkers flap configuration. Low aspect means your lift/span ratio is worse, so you want that totally clean top surface to make use of every square inch of area it has to keep the wing loading fairly light.
 

cluttonfred

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For a low AR plank fun flyer I think a high wing, tractor engine on the leading edge, and a simple bolted tube fuselage could work well. The effect would be like a tailless Weedhopper with a big rudder and you could include some transparent sections in the wing for upward visibility.

 

crusty old aviator

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If I were you, I would have a serious look at the Stabiloplan (see attachment). It was flying really well, according to pilots of that era.
Whew! And I thought Zenair's were ugly! The main gear is sooooo far forward! Fortunately, he moved it aft in the later version.
 
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Sockmonkey

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Now if you look at the Ragwing, It's very close to being a plank.

Ditch the tail, reflex the wing, and stick drag rudders at the tips.
 

daveklingler

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Like this?

View attachment 98596

25% scale test model for my full size 2 seat design...
Hm. That wings looks as if it has a fairly low aspect ratio, and I don't offhand see much in the way of twist.

I was thinking more of a Prandtl high-stability wing with a high aspect ratio and proverse yaw, like what NASA's been experimenting with recently:

ed14-0222-149.jpg


 

cblink.007

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Hm. That wings looks as if it has a fairly low aspect ratio, and I don't offhand see much in the way of twist.

I was thinking more of a Prandtl high-stability wing with a high aspect ratio and proverse yaw, like what NASA's been experimenting with recently:

View attachment 98709


Aspect ratio is higher than it appears, features proverse yaw, and should have decent flying characteristics. There is a tad under 10 degrees of twist from root to tip on my design; picture angle can be misleading. Wingspan for the full scale model is 10 meters.

Were you aiming for a sailplane-like layout?
 

daveklingler

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Aspect ratio is higher than it appears, features proverse yaw, and should have decent flying characteristics. There is a tad under 10 degrees of twist from root to tip on my design; picture angle can be misleading. Wingspan for the full scale model is 10 meters.

Were you aiming for a sailplane-like layout?
I just didn't spot the changes in the photo, but that's pretty exciting. How close are you to flying the model?
 

cluttonfred

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I agree in part but maybe just shorten the tail, enlarge the rudder, lose the horizontal stab, and probably move to tricycle gear so the ground angle isn’t extreme.

Now if you look at the Ragwing, It's very close to being a plank.

Ditch the tail, reflex the wing, and stick drag rudders at the tips.
 

Sockmonkey

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I agree in part but maybe just shorten the tail, enlarge the rudder, lose the horizontal stab, and probably move to tricycle gear so the ground angle isn’t extreme.
I have specific reasons for wanting the endplate drag rudders. They mitigate the tip vortexes, and provide more yaw leverage than you could get from an enlarged rudder that is so short-coupled. Plus drag rudders that open out only can double as air brakes when used together.
 
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