Flying Skiff

Discussion in 'The light stuff area' started by craig saxon, Jan 30, 2011.

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  1. Jan 30, 2011 #1

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

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    I found this photo in an English magazine but it was not identified. It's similar to an idea I've been mulling over for a while. Any ideas what it is and where I can find info on it?
    flying skiff.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2011
  2. Jan 30, 2011 #2

    PTAirco

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    Oh, that looks like fun. If you're designing an ultralight flying boat like that, you could make a lot of good use of the weight saved by leaving off the landing gear and the extra allowance for the float /hull. I could see that being popular in Florida, not so much in Arizona.
     
  3. Jan 30, 2011 #3

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

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    I put a brief description of my idea on the https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/...odynamics-new-technology/9406-hover-wing.html post but I didn't want to hijack someone else's thread. So I will copy it here.
    "A similar thought has crossed my mind, I have an 8 foot twin hulled hydroplane called a mercat. It was a racing class here in Oz many years ago. They ran a 30 hp mercury outboard and went like the clappers. I was thinking along the lines or a twin boom pusher mounted above the boat hull. What has put me off though is the hull is rather heavier than it needs to be due to the random mat that was used in it's construction. It could be made a lot lighter using carbon/kevlar after proper structural evaluation."
    Yes I do live on the coast and there are several salt water lakes in my part of the world, so undercarriage will be omitted for the reasons you have specified. I was thinking that I would take a mold off the existing hull and build a carbon/foam sandwich copy with hard points built in for the cabines to attach the aircraft section. For wings I was thinking along the lines of the Raven/Kitfox/Avid. Tubular spars,strut braced, wooden ribs and flaperons. The twin boom tail section would be along the lines of the Sadler Vampire which I have a great admiration for. I'm thinking around 50 or 60hp for the pusher engine installation should be more than adequate. My other design project that I have been sketching up has ground to a halt due to a lack of funds. This one is probably more achievable at the moment. And like you say, looks like fun.
    Craig
     
  4. Jan 30, 2011 #4

    Dana

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    That's kind of cool. It's similar to the "Fiying Inflatable Boat" (FIB) that's a semirigid Zodiac hull with a weightshift wing on it, but this one's 3 axis. Add easy folding wings and beaching gear and it'd be a great toy to take on vacation...

    -Dana

    Silence is golden, but duct tape is silver...
     
  5. Jan 30, 2011 #5

    WBNH

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    That's the new Catalina by Fly Synthesis:

    Catalina NG
     
  6. Jan 30, 2011 #6

    Dana

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    Nice. I could see myself in that. Unfortunately, though there are no prices posted, I doubt I could afford to see myself in that...

    -Dana

    I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute of it.
     
  7. Jan 30, 2011 #7

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

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    Look at that, just when you think you've come up with a great new concept, someone has already built it. Thanks for the link.
    Craig
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2011
  8. Feb 1, 2011 #8

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

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    I,ve done some searching, 38000 euros assembled, no kit prices quoted. Sadly, out of my league at the moment I'm afraid.
    Craig
     
  9. Feb 1, 2011 #9

    Dana

    Dana

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    That's actually not a bad price at all. Still out of my budget at the moment, though.

    -Dana

    "Calvin, we will not have an anatomically correct snowman!"
     
  10. Feb 5, 2011 #10

    Voyeurger

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  11. Feb 5, 2011 #11

    craig saxon

    craig saxon

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    Last edited: Feb 5, 2011
  12. May 17, 2011 #12

    conestogaman

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    I have given this some thought and was leaning toward the skinboat method of Hull/fuselage. WWW.Skinboats.com lightweight 18' hull of about 40 pounds or so. My question, can I use plans for a fabric covered ultralight plane like the ragwing parasol, and make a stepped hull on the bottom of the fuse, following the plans except for the bulkhead shapes, and still expect the same structural strength as the original design, without any other changes to the design, and still have a viable aircraft, without a full structural analysis? I would follow the plans exactly until it came to the actual shape of the bottom.

    Thanks,

    Jeff

    P.s. I know the ragwing uses 1/8 mahogany ply for the fuse, but I used it as an example. I also would choose an ultralight with a wing mounted engine, to prevent redesign of the whole thing. Thanks again...
     

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