Floats as hulls ?

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J.L. Frusha

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For stability purposes you're going to end up with something like the Icon, or have mini floats under the wings.

I've drawn one up as a chase-boat for jugging (jug fishing). I've employed race design stuff for catamaran and trimaran hulls and airflow modifications from hydroplanes. A V-shaped step that is flared, with ram air scoop pushing air into the notch to speed up lift to getting on plane. Plan for using a small I/O setup. The racing catamaran hull is an open patent I used for the basis is somewhere on my computer (less organized than my messy room, at the moment). I'll post it in a bit ($&*%... It's here somewhere)...

Edit: I also included design influences from hydroplane racing and Thai Longtail Race Boats

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dodgedartgt

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@BJC, my friend Ed Hoffman's father was one of the group that built the Benoist replica hanging in the St. Pete / Clearwater airport terminal.

@Pilot-34, (tried posting this before from my phone, no joy) if you search the EAA Sport Aviation archives ('70's) for the Kitalina, you'll find exactly what you proposed. A salvaged, repaired single large float as fuselage and cockpit, with (IIRC) type certified (Luscombe?) wings, C80 or C90 for engine and a built tail assy. It included 'retractable' float/gear assy's. I've lusted after this for years and would still have it.

@Tiger Tim, It's a type certified float, it's definitely gonna handle water loads, which IMO are much more strenuous than the common flight loads any seaplane or amphibian would routinely experience.
 

billyvray

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This fit this thread? Not really a "float" but a purpose built design. Pereira Osprey 1, plans still available. Seems like one with a lighter engine would be a rocket ship.


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Gregory Perkins

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Ick sounds ugly I think I will pass.
neither ugly nor stability problems due to being float based. You absolutely are on the right track as all seaplane designers are thinking about float design when they
build their hulls. It is impossible not to. They are one in the same. Look at some old designs and you can see the float design in their hulls.
 

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Tiger Tim

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[@Tiger Tim, It's a type certified float, it's definitely gonna handle water loads, which IMO are much more strenuous than the common flight loads any seaplane or amphibian would routinely experience.
I’m not denying that a float is strong because of the abusive life it must lead, but they’re also (typically) built around two major attach points to transmit those loads up to the rest of the airplane. The float-turned-fuselage will have holes cut in it, structure added, load paths moved, and a bunch of other stuff that EDO, etc. never considered.
 

Gregory Perkins

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A few more of my favorites
 

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Riggerrob

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That photo of Muktuk composites float shows a bottom planning surface wider than the deck.
How do you determine the width of the planning surface?
Note how early Curtiss and Felekstowe flying boats had planning surfaces much wider than their hulls.
 

Gregory Perkins

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Wider flatter bottom surfaces require less power to overcome hump to plane on the water but the tradeoff is losing ability to cut through waves and swells. Ocean going boats know very well to use Deep V hulls or else ! Most wide flat bottoms were during a time when power was hard to come by and they had no choice. Sure would be a help to low power ultralights however.
 
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