Flight Instructor issues....

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations / Flight Safety / Better Pil' started by MadProfessor8138, Sep 15, 2019.

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  1. Sep 16, 2019 #21

    MadProfessor8138

    MadProfessor8138

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    BBerson......he signed me to solo but here is my issue.
    I have years of flying ultralights,light experimentals,light helicopter and a few gyros from backwoods private strips.
    Now I'm trying to be responsible and be legal about things by getting my PPL because I'm building a RW19 Stork and plan to hit some fly-ins with it...I'll be in the spot light and noticed,so to speak.
    I'm trying to learn all of the required procedures and regulations that go along with the PPL.
    Naturally,I have bad habits from decades of flying unregulated...who doesnt.
    Hell,how many people could actually PASS their driving test again after driving on the roads for all these years....they have bad habits now and would probably fail.
    I'm glad that I can start putting in more hours with the Tomahawk now that I'm signed to solo but also worry that I may pick up bad habits that will fail my check ride because I'm unregulated now by not having someone tell me that my pattern is too tight....etc.
    The whole......I didnt know that I didn't know....scenario.

    Does that make any sense....???

    Kevin
     
  2. Sep 16, 2019 #22

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    Well, if you are already at solo building time then I would hit the books. Especially STICK AND RUDDER by Langweishe.
    And other flight manuals. He shouldn't need to touch the controls at all. The answers are in the books, so teach him if needed or get a new instructor. Or try another airplane.
    Did you pass the written?
     
  3. Sep 16, 2019 #23

    Voidhawk9

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    It isn't like a C-152 etc., those aircraft seem to cover your 'mistakes' and 'mush through' things a bit more to perhaps make things appear more consistent. The Tommie requires that you pay attention and always be flying the aircraft, but it'll do what you tell it to do. Look down at your map for a few seconds too long on a cross-country flight and when you look up you may be flying back the other way! It forces you to be a good pilot, IMHO. A good trainer.
    Probably the higher aspect ratio wing vs other common trainers makes it react a bit more quickly to pitch changes and the like and develop less drag at high AoA, so it would be harder to have two landings exactly the same if you don't have exactly the same speed and flare at the same altitude to within 2". It also won't drop onto the ground when you cut power as some types do, so maybe harder to 'pinpoint' the landing. Can be done, but you'll need to have it on the edge of the stall crossing the fence and have your feet ready (you won't be using the ailerons much at that AoA, will you?). With a good headwind and light load, it'll stop in 100ft and impress onlookers!
     
  4. Sep 16, 2019 #24

    Mark Z

    Mark Z

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    Get your time in, pay your dues for waiting so long and get your ticket in your pocket. If you like this guy stick with him. He won’t be there forever.
    An instructor is nothing more than a coach that puts a student in an environment where he can learn. If you know it already, this instruction period is a mere formality. Just do it!
     
  5. Sep 16, 2019 #25

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Based only on the original posting, I would have to agree that your instructor is not the right one for the job. He or she may be a 10,000 hour F-104 > F-117 > C-5A > airline pilot, and that might have nothing to do with the Tomahawk or anything else under 2000 pounds gross.

    There are several pilots on this forum who are instructors with far far more experience than me,and I'm not an instructor to start with. I'll stand behind the statement above, but if Rockiedog and BMCJ and a handful of others here tell you something different, take their advice over mine.
     
  6. Sep 16, 2019 #26

    bmcj

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    If you like him and want to continue flying with him, you can always have a heart-to-heart with him and try to come to a compromise on his style vs what you want to do.

    Do you want to stay with him, or are you just trying to spare his feelings? Since you started this thread by asking if you should change, I suspect that a change is what you really want.
     
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  7. Sep 16, 2019 #27

    Geraldc

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  8. Sep 16, 2019 #28

    TFF

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    First. He is not allowed to instruct without 5 hrs in type. He can fly it with no previous experience but needs 5 before instruction. That’s FARs. He needs to know how to fly that plane to be legal.

    Second you and he are fixated. They end up being different things for the same lessons. Excluding wrecking the plane, he is trying to get you to do something more precise than you are doing. You have enough experience to do it your way and it works. The problem is you still need to be able to do it his way. What you are both missing is how for that plane. If the DPE is going to want you to do it during the check ride, you need to do it. It’s really hard to give full specific advice without being in the cockpit so some of that has to be distilled to almost a grain of salt.

    Third you might have to un learn what you do for the check ride. Once you have the license, you can do what you want. Before you do you have to do what the CFI wants or you will not make it. Passing the check ride is what counts. Whatever is not connecting needs to be fixed.

    Fourth. The Tomahawk is not a GeeBee. How hard can this be?
     
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  9. Sep 16, 2019 #29

    BJC

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    Good advice, TFF. I was appalled at the techniques taught to my son-in-law, but they were what the highly-experienced CFI said that the FAA wanted to see on the check ride.


    BJC
     
  10. Sep 16, 2019 #30

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    Does he have any experience? Or is this a relatively new CFI?

    Ya, based on some of the comments. He's trying to help you get past a finish line the best way he knows how. You're goal should be the same so work with it. Once you're no longer his responsibility, feel free to do as you wish.[/QUOTE]
     
  11. Sep 16, 2019 #31

    Pops

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    OOP's, Thought I made a mistake onetime but I didn't :)
     
  12. Sep 16, 2019 #32

    12notes

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    I wasted a few thousand dollars and 30+ hours over 5 months with a CFI who was a nice guy, but terrible at teaching. I hadn't soloed, he wasn't teaching me to land the plane except to say the same 3-4 things over and over, and I almost quit. He just wanted hours to get to the airlines, and money from me. I switched to someone who was actually interested in flying and started over. Don't waste your time and money, it doesn't matter how nice he is.

    No adjustments on approach and landing 20kts over stall is just plain idiotic, and, worse, you will fail the checkride if you do them. He doesn't appear to know the procedures and regulations you're hoping he helps you with. Any one of those is reason enough to replace him.

    From the current ACS checkride document, this is what you'll actually be tested on:

    PA.IV.B.S6
    Establish the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed, and adjust pitch attitude and power as required to maintain a stabilized approach.

    PA.IV.B.S7
    Maintain manufacturer’s published approach airspeed or in its absence not more than 1.3 VSO, +10/-5 knots with gust factor applied.

    - Stall speed 53kts, 1.3Vso = 69kts, touchdown speed of 75kts is 6kts over the approach speed, not even close to the correct landing speed.

    PA.IV.B.S10
    Touch down at a proper pitch attitude, within 400 feet beyond or on the specified point, with no side drift, and with the airplane’s longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path.

    - Your pitch attitude isn't going to be proper touching down at 75kts.

    Soft Field landing:
    PA.IV.D.S9
    Make smooth, timely, and correct control inputs during the round out and touchdown, and, for tricycle gear airplanes, keep the nose wheel off the surface until loss of elevator effectiveness.

    - I don't think you'll be able to keep the nose wheel off the ground without lifting off again at 75kts.

    https://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/acs/media/private_airplane_acs.pdf

    TFF: The 5 hour requirement in make and model only apply to multi-engine, helicopter, and powered-lift instruction, as far as I could tell:
    61.195(f)
    "(f) Training received in a multiengine airplane, a helicopter, or a powered-lift. A flight instructor may not give training required for the issuance of a certificate or rating in a multiengine airplane, a helicopter, or a powered-lift unless that flight instructor has at least 5 flight hours of pilot-in-command time in the specific make and model of multiengine airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift, as appropriate."
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
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  13. Sep 16, 2019 #33

    Toobuilder

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    There are a few elements of your account that make me question his competence as a CFI - his "interpretation" of a stabilized approach and his "no stall horn landing" as just two examples. If these are truly his beliefs, then you need a new instructor. That said, maybe you are misinterpreting his instruction. I think you need to have a talk with him, not attached to any flying activity, and decide: 1. If he's incompetent and 2. If you two can break your communication barrier.

    Figure out those two issues and decide from there.
     
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  14. Sep 16, 2019 #34

    PiperCruisin

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    1.) Landing too fast is bad...
    2.) Concentrating on the rollout is a good thing, but retracting the flaps is normally part of the procedure for a short field landing.

    You can listen and learn, even from mediocre CFI's, but it is your money. I'm a CFI, but have not taught for a long time...would probably be bad at it since small errors would make me nervous and I would take the controls too soon.
     
  15. Sep 16, 2019 #35

    jedi

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    The above does not apply here. 12notes correctly noted in post # 32 FAR 61.195 (f) does not apply to airplanes.

    61.195(f)
    "(f) Training received in a multiengine airplane, a helicopter, or a powered-lift. A flight instructor may not give training required for the issuance of a certificate or rating in a multiengine airplane, a helicopter, or a powered-lift unless that flight instructor has at least 5 flight hours of pilot-in-command time in the specific make and model of multiengine airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift, as appropriate."

    TFF in post # 28 above was likely referring to an earlier version of 61.415 (e) that read "You my not provide flight training in an aircraft unless you have at least 5 hours of flight time in a make and model of light-sport aircraft within the same set of aircraft as the aircraft in which you are providing training."

    This limitation did not require 5 hours in "type" and only applied to Subpart K CFIs not to Subpart H CFIs and is not included in the current part 61 regulations.
     
  16. Sep 16, 2019 #36

    Dennis DeFrange

    Dennis DeFrange

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    Sounds like an X wife . Didn't agree to a dam thing with her for 10 years . Fixed the problem . Hope it don't take you that long to figure it out . Go fly and don't take him . Life is too short .
     
  17. Sep 16, 2019 #37

    TFF

    TFF

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    Too much helicopters.
     
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  18. Sep 16, 2019 #38

    MadProfessor8138

    MadProfessor8138

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    You know......when I started reading the responses to my post and every single person immediately replied with the same comment.."find another instructor "...I was tempted to make a joke pondering how many of you guys have been divorced...but I didn't.....lol

    Kevin
     
  19. Sep 16, 2019 #39

    TFF

    TFF

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    AIDS. Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome

    Whatever we say is only on a couple of short paragraphs. You know the CFI. Only you know if it is worth proceeding. I know a lot of CFIs. Most have never taught from scratch a student. I only know one true professional instructor and there is not enough students. As good as he is, there have been students that did not get along and went elsewhere. I have a lot of bad habits when I took my ppl. I had 354 hours logged in helicopters before my ppl. There is at least that many if not double that I never logged in test flights. I’m not chasing a flying career so it does not matter to me. I had to break some for the check ride and got some clarification from the DPE before. Had to work on some things. Fixed wing, I have 110 hours logged, about 30 before my instructor incident all in 152s. Friends started letting me fly their AA-5 and M-20E so I have a string of problems once I get back to fixed wing. The majority of my minor time is not in trainers. Most of my flying has been with CFIs so I know when they are good and when they are just riding. A lot forget I did not have a license for years so I flew like an operational pilot not like a student. Going back to a student is hard because of real world experience over text book.
     
  20. Sep 16, 2019 #40

    jedi

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    "During a "stabilized " approach....is it acceptable to make moderate pitch and power changes to stay on the glideslope and keep your approach stabilized?
    Moderate adjustments not panic adjustments."

    The key here is "moderate". Replace moderate with minor and the two of you will be on the same page.
    The goal should be to fly a smooth stable approach. The instructor is seeing large corrections and he is attempting to get you to be a smoother pilot. I see this in glider instruction with excessive pumping of the spoilers on final. More spoiler, less spoiler all the way down final.

    I ask the student what he would think as an airline passenger if the pilot went full power then idle as he flew the final approach.

    Yes, the approach could be flown that way but is it necessary? Probably not. It takes time for the aircraft to react. If you are constantly making control movements in opposite directions you are over controlling. It is much better to make two small corrections in the same direction than to make opposing control inputs. Smaller and sooner control inputs will make you a better pilot.

    If wind gust are driving the airspeed + and - 5 knots it is not necessary to change the power setting as the airspeed will return to the target in short order, (ie. more quickly than the actual speed can be adjusted via a power and or pitch change). However, if there is a decay in airspeed power must be increased. If the power is increased in a timely manner the change will be minor and not require a power reduction several seconds later.

    I would recommend you invite the CFI to come fly your plane with you (you buy the gas, he gets free flight time, no charge to you) and see if he is interested in building PA-38 time. Once he is comfortable with your plane, and you feel comfortable with him flying it, watch how he flies it. If he is a good instructor you will learn something. If he is not a "good pilot and instructor" it will soon be apparent that you need another CFI.
     

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