Fabulous Flying Feats

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Head in the clouds, Jul 15, 2012.

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  1. Jul 15, 2012 #1

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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    Having been reminded by one of Aircars' recent posts, of a demonstration of fantastic flying skill that resulted in a successful landing of a DC10(?) which had lost nearly all flight controls IIRC I thought it might be interesting to know more about those most notable events. Members may be able to tell of far more details than many of us know about.

    Some examples that come to mind -

    Perhaps my favourite - the dead stick ditching of the Airbus in the Hudson with zero loss of life. Pilot Chesley Burnett "Sully" Sullenberger III, former fighter pilot and I think I heard something about his also being a glider/sailplane pilot? He certainly was on that occasion. I was astounded by how unruffled he sounded on the radio.

    Apollo 13 was another...

    The DC10(?) incident which Aircar mentioned - where it was landed only by power and trimming the fuel IIRC

    I vaguely remember something about a Constellation or maybe it was a Britannia that lost three engines and had massive (engine loosening) vibrations through not being able to feather while crossing the ditch (Tasman Sea, Oz to NZ)...

    The DHL 767/747(?) that had the flaps, an engine etc blown off by a SAM after t/o from Baghdad and landed successfully.

    The QANTAS 747 that lost 3 (or4?) engines in volcanic ash.

    The A380 that had an uncontained engine burst and lost hydraulics, damaged wing etc (there was much more to that one than was heard in the general news).

    I think it would be interesting to hear about anything where a successful outcome was wrested from the clutches of disaster by superb airmanship.
     
  2. Jul 15, 2012 #2

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

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    You mean United 232 or are you referring to the Airbus that was hit with a SAM in Iraq? The former was a DC-10 but it was only a "partially successful" landing but still a remarkable feat of airmanship. The latter was the first recorded successful landing (as in not a "crash") of an aircraft after loss of hydraulics.
     
  3. Jul 15, 2012 #3

    Dana

    Dana

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    I never heard that Sully was a fighter pilot, but he definitely was a glider pilot. His supreme moment was not the successful river landing, but the split second decision to go for the river instead of Teterboro.

    For another time that a glider pilot saved the day, google "Gimli Glider".

    -Dana

    Don't ever think you know what's right for the other person. He might start thinking he knows what's right for you.
     
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  4. Jul 15, 2012 #4

    SVSUSteve

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    Yeah, if I recall he was an F-4 driver for the Air Force.
     
  5. Jul 15, 2012 #5

    Vigilant1

    Vigilant1

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    Well, maybe not really flashy, but this was interesting.
    From this web site (which also has some great pictures)

    As usual in such instances, an accident investigation board was convened (to figure out exactly how the crew can be blamed). Remember, very heavy taking off from Australia, a raging cargo fire inside the airplane and two dead engines on one wing (one ablaze and hanging down into the breeze). They successfully recovered only because there was a shallow riverbed and they skillfully milked up the flaps and managed their energy. The investigators started to dig into the aircraft commander for overspeeding the remaining two engines (causing damage to them and risking their failure during the flight). As I heard it:

    Q: "Your actions resulted in damage to the two port engines. Why did you bring them to 105% of rated thrust?"
    A: "Because they wouldn't do 106%." (Unspoken: "You idiot. Go to hell")
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2012
  6. Jul 15, 2012 #6

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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    Yes, I referred to a few feats of airmanship including both that you mentioned -

    The DHL hit by a SAM was an Airbus not a Boeing, as you said, pic below, how that still flew is quite amazing

    [​IMG]


    United 232 is another I referred to, I guess 111 folks would agree with you but the other 185 probably reckoned it was a highly successful landing :). From googling it that one had no flight controls as all 3 separate hydraulic systems failed due to failure of the tail engine. This was 1989 and the DHL thing was 2003 so I guess you mean Flight 232 was the first to land with hydraulic failure?
     
  7. Jul 15, 2012 #7

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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    Excellent, I'd never even heard of this one before! Aircar probably knows lots about it, Richmond Air Base is just near him, unless he was in Germany or the US at the time.
     
  8. Jul 15, 2012 #8

    SVSUSteve

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    I personally know three of the survivors of that crash and they all have a tough time balancing the loss of those other lives versus the miracle that it wasn't a completely fatal crash. It's one of those "best that can be done in a bad situation" and I hold Al Haines, Denny Fitch, Bill Records and Dudley Dvorak in the highest esteem.

    No, I meant exactly what I said. Most people don't count the crash at Sioux City as a landing given that the airplane cartwheeled and broke up in the process. The Baghdad shootdown attempt wound up with the aircraft on its wheels and largely intact save the damage from the missile strike. The only reason the aircraft wasn't repaired was that the aircraft was already nearing the age at which retirement was being considered. Other than a runway excursion, it was a remarkably "normal" landing.

    Here's a detailed discussion of the event: http://www.asasi.org/papers/2004/Malinge_Airbus Bagdhad_ISASI04.pdf

    According to that source, the aircraft was actually repaired and put up for sale after the incident.
     
  9. Jul 20, 2012 #9

    millerdvr

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  10. Jul 20, 2012 #10

    StarJar

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    There was the time Bob Hoover lost both engines right after take-off, with passengers aboard his Shrike Commander. If I have the story right, his only option was straight ahead, and it was little gullies and hills and nothing else. So he let the Shrike go down into the gully,in which a landing would have destroyed the plane. Then he pulled the plane up, at the last second, to bleed off the airspeed, and put it onto the the ridge, next to the the gully, with low enough airspeed for everyone to survive. Not a bad idea, and quick too!
    That's a sketchy version of the story, so feel free to correct me if I have some details wrong.
     
  11. Jul 20, 2012 #11

    Topaz

    Topaz

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    I remember reading this article about Bob Hoover in Sport Aviation quite a few years back. If this isn't the best, cool-headedest (?), most amazing test pilot flying there ever was, I'm not sure what else might qualify. The man forever has my respect as one heck of a pilot and, from everything I've ever heard, a genuinely nice human being as well.
     
  12. Jul 20, 2012 #12

    SVSUSteve

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    Bob is one of the nicest people ever. At Oshkosh a couple of years back he gave me a cigar with instructions that it is for celebrating the first flight of my design. It's sitting on my bookshelf in a place of honor and is one of my prized possessions.
     
  13. Jul 20, 2012 #13

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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    In case anyone hasn't googled the Gimli Glider story or clicked Topaz's link on Bob Hoover, I can't recommend them more highly, both are stories that'll raise the hairs on the back of your neck!
     
  14. Jul 21, 2012 #14
  15. Jul 21, 2012 #15

    JIC

    JIC

    JIC

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    Many years ago when I was a student at a flight school in Reno, Nevada, There was a student and a
    instructor out in one of the practice areas, the instructor pulled the power on the Cessna 150 the were
    in and ask the student where he was going to land, the student told the instructor back at the airport at
    Stead, and he did just that, what the instuctor didn't know is that the student had many many hours in
    a glider.

    jic
     
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  16. Jul 22, 2012 #16

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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