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FAA written exam / gliders

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Bille Floyd

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Sep 26, 2019
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406
Best books, to prepare me for the FAA written and oral exams
for a sailplane licence ?

I have a logbook from 1998 , with about 20 hours in the
L-13, SGS 1-26 , and 2-33 gliders ; i'd like to finish off
my glider licence, and thought getting the written out
of the way first, might be the way to go ? I have thermal
theory down sorta OK ; bin flying Rigid-wing HG's, since
1980.

Thanks : Bille
 

TFF

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Written is about memorizing and regurgitating. Some like Gleim I like ASA. Mark the ones applicable and learn them. It’s the way the system is designed. Skip all other questions.

Oral is different. FAA knowledge book. Medical topics, weather and FARs will be asked from that. Good knowledge of the handbook of your check flight aircraft. Any other book that helps explain. Gliders might be more laid back, but that what they will ask about. Anything aircraft is usually kept short. Mostly simple like AOA and annual requirements.

It’s a glossy rendition but regulation is on the top side as they know most people like the aircraft part, so it’s easy.
 

Bille Floyd

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Sep 26, 2019
Messages
406
How is the written going?
I missed this when it was posted.
Glider Handbook, AC 8083 Is free online thru FAA.gov and has 90% of what you need.
This one ?

I think :
That covid-19 Fog is real ; after getting it in August , i'm having a really
difficult time , "concentrating" , and placing new knowledge, in long-term memory. :(
Good part is : the brain is coming back, (slowly) ; and my lungs are getting better !! :)

So studying , has bin problematic .

Bille
 

Victor Bravo

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Find a different way to study it, instead of just straight memorization out of a book. Do it verbally in a discussion, or do it while juggling tennis balls, or do it while walking backwards. Have your brain keeping part of itself busy on something else very often allows the brain to accept and process learning other things better.

One of the few "modern, new-age, psycho-babble" things that is actually very true and worthwhile is that different people have different ways of learning. They are finally figuring out there are many different reasons some kids learn better in school than others. It's not always that one kid is lazy, or "slow" or doesn't care. They have found that different brains have different pathways for knowledge to get in and stay in.

So in your case, there is a reasonable possibility that you will have better ability to learn/memorize/process the study materials by "tricking" your brain into opening up one of those alternative pathways. You may have been a perfect "book learner" years ago, and never had the reason or need to explore other "data entry" pathways, and perhaps now you would benefit by exploring them because the "book learning" pathway has gotten a little clogged with Covid, or old age, or all those little squares of rice paper at Woodstock, or whatever else.

You can read about some of this here: Kinesthetic learning - Wikipedia
 

jedi

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Bille Floyd

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Sep 26, 2019
Messages
406
Find a different way to study it, instead of just straight memorization out of a book. Do it verbally in a discussion, or do it while juggling tennis balls, or do it while walking backwards. Have your brain keeping part of itself busy on something else very often allows the brain to accept and process learning other things better.

One of the few "modern, new-age, psycho-babble" things that is actually very true and worthwhile is that different people have different ways of learning. They are finally figuring out there are many different reasons some kids learn better in school than others. It's not always that one kid is lazy, or "slow" or doesn't care. They have found that different brains have different pathways for knowledge to get in and stay in.

So in your case, there is a reasonable possibility that you will have better ability to learn/memorize/process the study materials by "tricking" your brain into opening up one of those alternative pathways. You may have been a perfect "book learner" years ago, and never had the reason or need to explore other "data entry" pathways, and perhaps now you would benefit by exploring them because the "book learning" pathway has gotten a little clogged with Covid, or old age, or all those little squares of rice paper at Woodstock, or whatever else.

You can read about some of this here: Kinesthetic learning - Wikipedia
Great read ; Thanks !!

A slight , "re-wire" job , till the brain returns to normal ; but when
it does, (now i have more cylinders to fire from).

You know my background Victor -- I'v always just taken my cognitive
abilities , for granite ; not-so, any longer. The brain and lungs, are both
getting better, since my bout with the bug ; the lungs through physical exercise,
and now i have a quicker way to achieve the same with the brain.

Again -- Thanks !!

Bille
 

peter hudson

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May 24, 2020
Messages
47
I'm in the same boat...had a log book from 1975 (when I was 14-15) with 2-33 and 1-26 time. It was hard to pay for those flights mowing lawns, and when a local shop opened building hang gliders, I went straight to work for them, and flying HG, and never finished the sailplane ticket. Now I'm finally going back to get that rating. Strangely, since I have a single engine land rating, I need to get a biannual in a powered plane so I can solo the gliders as PIC.

You should also get this to review: (the Practical test standards for gliders)
 

jedi

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I'm in the same boat...had a log book from 1975 (when I was 14-15) with 2-33 and 1-26 time. It was hard to pay for those flights mowing lawns, and when a local shop opened building hang gliders, I went straight to work for them, and flying HG, and never finished the sailplane ticket. Now I'm finally going back to get that rating. Strangely, since I have a single engine land rating, I need to get a biannual in a powered plane so I can solo the gliders as PIC.

You should also get this to review: (the Practical test standards for gliders)
Get some clarification on that.

With a ASEL certificate you can get a LSG rating with a CFI recomendation and an other CFI to do a flight check provided you have access to a Light Sport Glider (Vne of 127 kts or less). Skip the PPL glider and go for the commercial in just a few more flights.

Typical Light Sport Equivalent Glider is the SGS 2-33.

Lacking that there is an alternate reading of the FARs that lets you fly the glider solo with a typical solo endorsement. It has been a few years since we went thru that but it was sorted out after considerable discussion with several CFIs and FAA participation. I think the ultimate solution was if you can't beet them then just wear them down till they quit or don't care. In the end the insurance company will decide the issue.
 
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peter hudson

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I argued that, technically, I already meet the requirements for the glider rating check ride (PPL and dual and 10+ solo flights) but since they were so long ago, the organization I'm training with wants me to repeat some solo flights to satisfy their insurance requirements by sticking with their "usual practice". Their argument is that with my ASEL I still need to meet currency requirements to solo in the 2-33. At this point the easiest path seems to me to just go fly a 152 with a CFI and move on. I'm trying to pretend that a quick review in a 152 will be fun. I'll have to reread the FAR to see if I can interpret them to just allow a solo endorsement from the glider CFI.
 

Victor Bravo

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So go out and fly the 150, then scratch up the nose skid on the 2-33 and 1-26 a few times to check the box on the insurance form, take your glider check ride, and git'r'done :)

There are worse ways to spend your weekend !
 

jedi

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§61.87 Solo requirements for student pilots.
(a) General. A student pilot may not operate an aircraft in solo flight unless that student has met the requirements of this section. The term “solo flight” as used in this subpart means that flight time during which a student pilot is the sole occupant of the aircraft or that flight time during which the student performs the duties of a pilot in command of a gas balloon or an airship requiring more than one pilot flight crewmember.

(b) Aeronautical knowledge. ....deleated

(c) Pre-solo flight training. Prior to conducting a solo flight, a student pilot must have:

(1) Received and logged flight training for the maneuvers and procedures of this section that are appropriate to the make and model of aircraft to be flown; and

(2) Demonstrated satisfactory proficiency and safety, as judged by an authorized instructor, on the maneuvers and procedures required by this section in the make and model of aircraft or similar make and model of aircraft to be flown.

.........

(i) Maneuvers and procedures for pre-solo flight training in a glider. A student pilot who is receiving training for a glider rating or privileges must receive and log flight training for the following maneuvers and procedures:

(1) Proper flight preparation procedures, including preflight planning, preparation, aircraft systems, and, if appropriate, powerplant operations;

(2) Taxiing or surface operations, including runups, if applicable;

(3) Launches, including normal and crosswind;

(4) Straight and level flight, and turns in both directions, if applicable;

(5) Airport traffic patterns, including entry procedures;

(6) Collision avoidance, windshear avoidance, and wake turbulence avoidance;

(7) Descents with and without turns using high and low drag configurations;

(8) Flight at various airspeeds;

(9) Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions;

(10) Ground reference maneuvers, if applicable;

(11) Inspection of towline rigging and review of signals and release procedures, if applicable;

(12) Aerotow, ground tow, or self-launch procedures;

(13) Procedures for disassembly and assembly of the glider;

(14) Stall entry, stall, and stall recovery;

(15) Straight glides, turns, and spirals;

(16) Landings, including normal and crosswind;

(17) Slips to a landing;

(18) Procedures and techniques for thermalling; and

(19) Emergency operations, including towline break procedures.

.........

(n) Limitations on student pilots operating an aircraft in solo flight. A student pilot may not operate an aircraft in solo flight unless that student pilot has received an endorsement in the student's logbook for the specific make and model aircraft to be flown by an authorized instructor who gave the training within the 90 days preceding the date of the flight.

(p) Limitations on flight instructors authorizing solo flight. No instructor may authorize a student pilot to perform a solo flight unless that instructor has—

(1) Given that student pilot training in the make and model of aircraft or a similar make and model of aircraft in which the solo flight is to be flown;

(2) Determined the student pilot is proficient in the maneuvers and procedures prescribed in this section;

(3) Determined the student pilot is proficient in the make and model of aircraft to be flown; and

(4) Endorsed the student pilot's logbook for the specific make and model aircraft to be flown, and that endorsement remains current for solo flight privileges, provided an authorized instructor updates the student's logbook every 90 days thereafter.

§61.56 Flight review.
...........

(c) Except as provided in paragraphs (d), (e), and (g) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft unless, since the beginning of the 24th calendar month before the month in which that pilot acts as pilot in command, that person has—
..........

(g) A student pilot need not accomplish the flight review required by this section provided the student pilot is undergoing training for a certificate and has a current solo flight endorsement as required under §61.87 of this part.
 
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TFF

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Legal is one thing, borrowing somebody’s airplane is another. It’s the difference between owning and renting. It’s their ball you want to play with, not the other way around.
 

peter hudson

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Thanks Jedi,

That just leaves whether I meet the FAR definition of student pilot... I may have to submit a request for a student pilot certificate per 61.85... unusual for a licensed pilot but perhaps the best workaround.

I appreciated you input on this. Thank you.
 

peter hudson

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Messages
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Legal is one thing, borrowing somebody’s airplane is another. It’s the difference between owning and renting. It’s their ball you want to play with, not the other way around.
They have no problem with my flying skills and do want me to play with their balls (that didn't sound right). But they want to make sure it's done per the FARs. The only extra bit is them wanting me to get more than the required solo flights but really that's just me flying around which is the whole point anyway.
 

jedi

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Thanks Jedi,

That just leaves whether I meet the FAR definition of student pilot... I may have to submit a request for a student pilot certificate per 61.85... unusual for a licensed pilot but perhaps the best workaround.

I appreciated you input on this. Thank you.
No need for the student pilot certificate. Your private pilot ASEL certificate gives you the student pilot privileges just as an ATP lets the holder operate with the privileges of all lower certificates.
 

TFF

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I believe 61.109 has the minimum FAA requirements to add glider. Minimum club requirements is to their prerogative but that is usually insurance they have to have. Insurance rules aviation and their exposure to aviation is on the downswing. If you had your own glider and tow plane would be about the only way to pull off a minimum requirement in this day and age. That might be the only way to play soon.
 
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