Extra thin cap strips

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Tiger Tim

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I was thumbing through the Flying and Glider Manual reprints the other day and the rib drawing for the Gere Sport stood out as odd.
98AA3035-0380-4400-B5C2-9494E62152A3.jpeg

Notice how the cap strips are 1/8” x 1/2” when I feel like the standard is closer to 14” square. Same amount of material (and thus weight) in either case but does that seem right to you folks?
 

TFF

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It’s not conventional today, but if you were in 1930 and building an airplane at home, it’s probably as good a guess as any. Lots were guessing. If I was to build one today, it would be 1/4x1/4 or 1/4x3/8s. Heavier? Not a game changer. 1/8 would be pretty fragile on hangar rash. I wonder if there was something standard that used 1/8x1/2 like baskets or something laminated that made it off the shelf depression cheap?
 

Tiger Tim

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Yeah, hangar rash had been my first concern too. Checking the rest of the FGM plans shows that the second thinnest stock for truss ribs is the Heath Parasol with 7/32” square while the rest are largely 1/4” square and the Pietenpol Aircamper calls for 1/4” x 1/2”.

Interestingly, the Gere article mentions the wood in the plane was designed to be pine but admits spruce would be better. Unfortunately Bud Gere wasn’t available for comment as he was killed in an accident before the engine installation was finished on his little biplane. It said the original one was completed, flown, and ended up at a university. I wonder if it survived.
 

TFF

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I think there have been a few replicas. Did they build faithfully? I would probably say, no. Not that it’s built the same, but ever since I was a kid, the Bud Nosen giant scale Gere Sport was one plane I always wanted.
 

TFF

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14 square is where Rutan came up with his fiberglass and foam. He saw the 14 square ribs and thought to himself, instead of a tree trunk for a rib, carve it out of foam. The people who built with 1/4” square always got a laugh from the 14 square ribs.
 

WonderousMountain

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Surprisingly similar to what I'm doing with Stubby Bipe.
Replace the ply with furring strip, grain should align no
less than 1/12 runout slope. This gets more bond line
for fabric tack vs. 1-4. Suggest one foot rib bay spacing?
 

WonderousMountain

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Wing ribs of Comper swift refurbished vintage aircraft.
Furring Strips were pretty common in old dwellings. A
Ten pack sells at the Local lumber big box in the teens.
Comper Swift 02-08-14 (3).JPG
115-3.jpg
It gives the impression of being lighter built than mine.
Notice X section aerostructure, they don't make them
like that anymore either.
 
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