Engine Out Vid

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

wsimpso1

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Messages
8,596
Location
Saline Michigan
Did I see a cap off the rod? Right out of reassembly... Wow. Good job on handling the emergency.
 

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
3,172
Location
Midwest
I watched the video and I have to disagree on him taking the right action when engine blew up. He went straight into a 180 turn and just made the end of the run way nearly ending up in the canal and you can see there was a clear path straight (no buildings or people) ahead for an emergency landing which is what we are all taught to do. The pilot seemed very occupied with monitoring engine data even before he did run up on the runway. In my opinion he got lucky that day.
 

Hephaestus

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2014
Messages
2,364
Location
YMM
"Let's see my reaction..."

Yep the pilot cooling fan stopped - the sweating started right away ;)

Notice how hard he's breathing at touchdown. (I'm keying in on this because I learned I need to work on this too)

Well done. Walked away plane reusable. Nothing to complain about.
 

Voidhawk9

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2012
Messages
679
Location
Timaru, NZ
A turn back like this, if properly prepared for and handled, is quite safe. Especially since he had another, more convenient runway to line-up on. As can be seen. He more than made the runway, rolled to the end and vacated with remaining energy. Was it perfect? No. Could he have done things better? Sure. Show me a perfect power-ON circuit!
Well done I say.
 

tralika

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
117
Location
Wasilla Alaska
Airplane pilots should take a lesson from Glider pilots on emergencies during take off. On every take off, a Glider pilot is trained to brief for a tow rope break. For most gliders if the break occurs below 200' AGL you land straight ahead, within 30 degrees left or right of runway heading. If you're familiar with the area you already know where you will land. If the rope break occurs above 200' AGL you turn back to the runway. You make the decision on which direction to turn based on the local geography and wind direction (turn into the wind). During every take off you keep track of your altitude and make note (or announce out loud) when you pass 200' AGL.

It's a good idea to self brief the same emergency plan for every Airplane take off. However it's especally important to have this plan established when flying a new or overhauled engine. Know your turn back altitude and keep track of when you reach it. Plan a place to land if you are below your turn back altitude. Know which direction to turn based on local geography and wind direction.
 

Brünner

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2020
Messages
245
Location
Beer country
Nice clip, thank you Ross.
I would've probably waited a bit longer to drop the gear, but otherwise well done. Massive oil loss it seems? Look at the white smoke coming out, and the seizure shortly after that. It would be interesting to know the engine parameters right before.
 

cvairwerks

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
340
Location
North Texas
If you look at the second video he has on the failure, near the end he posts the running data.... From time of oil pressure loss until seizure is only a few seconds. Oil pressure goes from around 54 psig to under 10 psig, in less than 2 seconds.
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
10,077
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
If you look at the second video he has on the failure, near the end he posts the running data.... From time of oil pressure loss until seizure is only a few seconds. Oil pressure goes from around 54 psig to under 10 psig, in less than 2 seconds.
Something as obvious as a pressure hose coming loose... or something internal like a sheared shaft on the oil pump?
 

cvairwerks

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
340
Location
North Texas
Something as obvious as a pressure hose coming loose... or something internal like a sheared shaft on the oil pump?
Don't know, but based on the crankshaft construction, I'd guess that maybe the internal plug came loose.....It's the size of the internal bore and that would drop the pressure that fast. Losing a line might, but having seen line failures on bigger engines, they tend to take a little more time to drop the pressure.
 

D Hillberg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
1,535
Location
very low low low earth orbit
Lost a rod and the oiling hole dropped the pressure
looks like a connecting rod bolt failed.
Buzz sawed the case too.
Ouch.
If he bellied the plane on the runway the insurance would of paid off - As is they don't cover engine failures
 
Top