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Engine for Stewart Headwind?

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TFF

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A drive on a 1200 would make a huge difference over straight drive. Today a 1835 is just as easy to build and just as cheap. It would get rid of the extra step of building a drive.
 

Vigilant1

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Go with a direct drive VW. If you use a reduction drive its going to cost you a lot of added weight with the needed starter with a electrical system ,battery, etc.
VW don't have to spin 3000 rpm. My 1835 cc, VW engine in the high drag SSSC cruises at 80 mph at 2650/2700 rpm with a 60"x26" Culver prop burning 2.9/3.0 gph, with a 1200'+ ROC. Non-electric, 141 lb firewall forward weight.
That's what I would do, esp as the Headwind is known to fly well using a smaller direct drive VW. Simple, known to work, relatively cheap: an aviation trifecta.
 

Dave Shaw

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Nov 2, 2019
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Kyle, I worked with Don back in the 90s helping clean up his drawings to what you get today. Don would probably recommend the use of a VW with the Maximizer. He has stopped advertising now but when he did he always used a picture of the Geide Headwind which had a Maximizer as he felt it best represented the Headwind.

Don is a class act guy. I managed to pull some strings and got him a tour at LM when the F22 line was running. He later sent me copies of the Headwind, Maximizer and his Foo Fighter.

So are you really building a Headwind??
 

Kyle Boatright

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So are you really building a Headwind??
Not right now. I have a 99% finished RV-10 in the garage that I need to push over the finish line.

After that is finished and flying (or even once it goes to the airport), I'll be looking for a "next" project. I enjoy having something to work on here at the house. The candidates include restarting a Hatz project I began many years ago, maybe building something truly low and slow like a Headwind, Fly Baby, or Currie Wot, or restoring an Aeronca. Of the three "really low and slow" homebuilts, the Wot "feels" like the most work and the least practical given I don't have a 1500' square grass field to operate from. The Headwind is probably the easiest to build and is certainly unique.
 
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plncraze

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When you think you want to build a Wot read "Birds and Fools Fly" by Urmston.
 

Kyle Boatright

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Haven't read that! If you want to get inspired to fly a Wot, read "Airymouse" by Harald Penrose. ;)
I have a copy of that one. It didn't do a lot for me. It is still sitting on my nightstand. Maybe I'll have another go at it as they would say in Blighty.
 

Pops

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Here's the Maximizer from Don's plans: I wouldn't fly without it but I'd just make my own because the original cast pieces are not readily available. View attachment 103403
I think you are right. Looking at the generator stand I couldn't tell what it was and I didn't catch the other picture of the side mount fuel pump. No question , it's a 36 hp engine.
 

ToddK

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The Real Texas
Not right now. I have a 99% finished RV-10 in the garage that I need to push over the finish line.

After that is finished and flying (or even once it goes to the airport), I'll be looking for a "next" project. I enjoy having something to work on here at the house. The candidates include restarting a Hatz project I began many years ago, maybe building something truly low and slow like a Headwind, Fly Baby, or Currie Wot, or restoring an Aeronca. Of the three "really low and slow" homebuilts, the Wot "feels" like the most work and the least practical given I don't have a 1500' square grass field to operate from. The Headwind is probably the easiest to build and is certainly unique.
Unique is fun. It’s very cool to have an airplane that most pilots have never seen.
 

Turd Ferguson

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The part I like about the maximizer is it maximizes the surface area for the prop to seat against. If you ever taken a wooden prop off a plane and noticed the wood looks black or burnt where it touches the mounting flange.......that's not good.
 
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