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Engine failure just after take off - video

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mmatt

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Engine quits just after take off - video

Full disclosure: this was completely my fault. I am already aware of the mistakes I made and have learned from them. I am posting this that others may learn from my experience and not make the same mistake(s) I did. Please keep your comments respectful. Thank you.


Full description is also in the video but the crux of it is, I made the bad decision to taxi into position for take off with a nearly empty tank and then forgot to switch to the full tank.


 
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mmatt

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Apr 13, 2015
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Bad title - the engine did not fail but I did count about 10 pilot errors. Is your passenger also a pilot?
Would "Engine quits just after take off" be better? I didn't really think about the phrasing but you're right, I should change it.

Can you list the errors you saw please? I"m here to learn.

No, Curtis is not a pilot but he's interested in becoming one.
 

WBNH

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Portsmouth, NH
"Fuel Starvation leads to safe dead-stick" would be my suggested title.

Another "I learned about flying from that" moment. Thanks for posting. And for the cool Tube channel...been following it a while, somewhat to check out the Beaver and Chinook aircraft, neither of which have a presence in my area.

Reminds me that fuel management (and inadequate placement of fuel selector) got John Denver. Nice to see yours was a much more manageable situation. Also nice that your passenger was willing to go up immediately for the additional circuit.
 

TahoeTim

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Apr 27, 2011
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Location
South Lake Tahoe. Ca.
before takeoff:

1. dripping port: drain it into a 5gal jug and fix it or swap it quick with fuel in the tank. I've done a couple both ways and spill very little fuel.

1a. I was taught to select my tank before I start my plane. It's in my checklist pre start and a second time at run up.

2. non pilot at the controls but has no idea how to operate them

3. a plane with no brakes

4. a runaway plane on an active airport

5. no run up (again, no brakes)

6. no checklist

7. no headset or any ear protection for passenger

8. you got out of a running plane to turn on a **** camera, and your passenger revved the engine and almost ran you over

9. "i told my pass to remind me to switch tanks before takeoff" how would that be accomplished without a pass headset?

after take off:

10. The engine quits and you do ONE thing correctly, you fly the plane. But then, you tell a non pilot to prime the engine! Again, no pass headset. If you were not near the airport, how would you tell him to brace for impact?

11. "my first on pavement landing in quite awhile" Do you not know the rules? Do you not care about your friends life?

12. "we clear the flooding and take off again" Where is your judgement? It's a two stroke and you should have parked it and pulled the plugs. You didn't "clear" anything and were very lucky it didn't stop running on the second flight. You do not have brakes so you couldn't even do a run up. The passenger should NOT be in the plane after an engine out. Again, you are responsible for the passenger's life.


I'm not some hot shot pilot with thousands of hours but I can see trouble in your future if don't change your attitude towards being a safe pilot. Take the **** camera off your plane and learn to fly safely before advancing your Youtube career. Stop taking passengers until you can land in any condition and on any surface comfortably.

That single act of stopping to turn on your camera started a chain of events that could have killed you both had the engine kept running a minute longer to get you further away from the airport. Oh, and I do not support your revised thread title. Here's one: "Showboating pilot nearly kills himself and his friend". The engine had nothing to do with anything in that video!
 

mmatt

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Canada
Like I said, I learned a lot from this experience and you have pointed out some additional things that I have considered. Namely:

- passengers will always have headsets from now on
- fuel tank will be selected before engine start
- I will not be exiting the aircraft with a running engine unless the wheels are chocked or the brakes are locked (my other plane does have brakes)
- I have already printed out revised checklists and they will be affixed to the panel or other prominent location in plain view of either pilot


Some things I'd like to rebut though:

- a proper runup was done before the the camera was started (wheels were chocked)
- I've cleared a flooded engine many a time in my life, there was no danger with me taking off the second time. Even if there was and the engine did quit, I stayed within gliding distance of the runway at all times.
- the passenger did not rev the throttle, it was a wind gust that started the plane moving. He has flown with me many times and I trust him to not interfere with the plane. I would not have left someone I didn't trust at the controls in this situation.
- there is no rule stating that I have to practice my take offs and landings from the pavement. This experience did show me that I am perfectly capable of doing so and I will not be so apprehensive about operating a taildragger from the pavement in the future.
- it is entirely possible to communicate without a headset with the engine at idle or taxi speed. Regardless, it was not his job to tell me to switch tanks, I only said it out loud to him in that manner because I find that doing so helps me to remember stuff - usually.

(edited: sorry, was out of line)
 
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TahoeTim

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South Lake Tahoe. Ca.
You did not do a proper run up after the engine was flooded and your arrogance shows in your response. It could have fouled at 100ft elevation, Then what? To say you stay in the pattern is silly.

What about the empty tank? Did any crud or water get into the system? You should have parked it and checked the fuel system carefully. It's gonna bite you someday if you don't gain more respect for safety and be more cautious.

Your video refutes the wind gust story. Why did you yell at him when it rolled away? Either he revved it up or you left the plane at a very high throttle setting. His hands are feverishly all over ALL the controls. I watched the resumption of taxi and listened to the engine rpm to come to my conclusion that it was revving higher than idle when you jumped out. Also, If a wind gust is powerful enough to roll a plane fast enough that your full force barely stopped it then it was way too windy to fly. I stand by my assessment of your judgement and don't care how mad you are. I feel sorry for Curtis, he will be the victim to your antics.

I repeat, take the **** camera off the plane and focus on flying safely.

Just stay far away from Tahoe, I don't want you anywhere near me in the pattern.
 

TahoeTim

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South Lake Tahoe. Ca.
BTW - do you leave your kids in a running car while you exit the car in gear without any brakes? Think about it.

I'm trying to give you a SERIOUS wake up call. You don't seem to be grasping how close you came to killing yourself and a friend, twice.
 

mmatt

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I didn't yell at him, I was joking with him. He's my best friend and we joke yell at each other all the time. I figured the smile on my face gave it away.

Regardless, like I said, I appreciate the help and you even pointed out some additional things I hadn't thought of. Trust me when I say I have learned from this and won't be making the same mistakes again.

I'll be sure to stay clear of your airspace.
 
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BJC

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I didn't yell at him, I was joking with him. He's my best friend and we joke yell at each other all the time. I figured the smile on my face gave it away.

Regardless, I thought I was sharing a learning experience. I guess I came to the wrong place.
No, you came to the correct place.

You made a mistake, and you openly shared it with others. That is a good thing. That you learned from it is a good thing. All of us have made mistakes, but we seldom share them.

People here at HBA, including me, can be extremely critical at times. That is just human nature. When you consider that most pilots know everything, and feel a duty to bestow their knowledge on others, then critical posts and responses are to be expected. Welcome, we all have experienced it.

Stick around, comtinue to post, expecially the videos, always go through your checklist, and have fun.


BJC
 

Chris In Marshfield

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Thanks for sharing your experience, @mmatt. I'm sure we've all had those "oh snap" moments that we look back upon as serious learning moments. I'm sure even @TahoeTim has experienced them. :)

Don't let the comments of the one outweigh the learning benefits of the many. Carry on smartly, having learned some good lessons. What's in the past is, indeed, in the past. Hindsight is 20/20, and all that other cliche stuff.
 

N8053H

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Thanks for sharing this. None of us want any of the members on this forum or any aviation forum or any forum to become a statistic. We all make mistakes. It's called being human.

Thanks for sharing your video.
 

mmatt

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Canada
After Taco Tims tirade I doubt many will want to share their experiences here.
I know that I certainly don't want to anymore. I still will in the interest of helping others remain safe but I'll be sure to don my flamesuit from now on. I guess even this experience is good for me. A thick skin often helps in life.
 

TFF

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See thats the problem with efficient engines, it does not take much fuel to get off the ground. I say thats a joke in internet land. Everyone seems to do this, which is let some defect make you override normal operations. Not having fuel in the other tank because of a leak is common. I know people who fly on one take because of leaks. And probably the sin that the FAA has least tolerance for. Running out of gas. The good things is you handled it well, and you did climb instead of tree top hop.
 
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