Electric WIG

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
11,106
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
"When working in the nascent eVTOL (electric vertical take off and landing) industry, the founders of REGENT became aware of the limitations of current battery technology."

I think I just s**t myself laughing. Can anyone help sop up this tea from my keyboard?

As a nascent member of the workforce at my first job, I eventually became aware of the limitations minimum wage imposed on my buying power .
 

sanman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2021
Messages
266


Seems like WIG could be useful in helping electric propulsion get a foothold in aviation.

The extra efficiency afforded by WIG, and the faster reaction time of electric propulsion as well as its distributed power could be a mutually complementary fit.
 

J.L. Frusha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
1,043
Location
Luling, Texas
Some Hybrid race cars have stand alone generators, eliminating battery weight altogether (Well, a small one for the generator).
 

Lendo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2013
Messages
935
Location
Brisbane
rv6ejguy, How true, but with current technology approach, it may never be good enough in power or weight. What is needed is an entirely new technology, something I can't even imagine, nor it seems can anybody else at this point in time.
George
 

addaon

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2008
Messages
1,975
Location
Kanab, UT
It seems every electric aircraft project is waiting for that revolution in battery technology...

Not sure what's so hard for project engineers to figure out here. KWH per KG... Um, that battery is gonna weigh X amount. Holy crap!
I think a major part of it is that energy density of batteries is improving at 15% - 20% a year, but a Part 23 certification project takes 10 - 15 years. So if you wait for the technology to be ready to start development, you've missed the bus. It makes more sense to design to today's technology and make a minor change when the next factor-of-ten enables much more interesting missions.
 

J.L. Frusha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
1,043
Location
Luling, Texas
I think a major part of it is that energy density of batteries is improving at 15% - 20% a year, but a Part 23 certification project takes 10 - 15 years. So if you wait for the technology to be ready to start development, you've missed the bus. It makes more sense to design to today's technology and make a minor change when the next factor-of-ten enables much more interesting missions.

 

dog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
732
an electric wig could certainly demonstrate a very
big number of miles traveled on a single charge
and ya ya ya,no payload,charge time,la la la
and for a truely out there long shot,someone
has an ion drive cargo drone flying at tree top
levels
 

rv6ejguy

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2012
Messages
4,824
Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
I think a major part of it is that energy density of batteries is improving at 15% - 20% a year, but a Part 23 certification project takes 10 - 15 years. So if you wait for the technology to be ready to start development, you've missed the bus. It makes more sense to design to today's technology and make a minor change when the next factor-of-ten enables much more interesting missions.
We haven't see lithium battery energy densities (Kwh/Kg rather than Kwh/L is what's most important for aircraft) improve like this in the production automotive world- (Tesla). Has been only a few % per year for the last few years now.
 

addaon

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2008
Messages
1,975
Location
Kanab, UT
Depends what time frame you average over since it’s a bit of step function for mass production due to the cost and time of reworking a factory…. But even a 5%/year increase takes a half-hour + reserve design to three times that (with same reserve) over a 15 year dev cycle.
 

rv6ejguy

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2012
Messages
4,824
Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Depends what time frame you average over since it’s a bit of step function for mass production due to the cost and time of reworking a factory…. But even a 5%/year increase takes a half-hour + reserve design to three times that (with same reserve) over a 15 year dev cycle.
Lab batteries don't count for EVs going into production today. There are lots of promising advances on the horizon in battery tech but there's a world of difference between prototypes and POC designs and reliable production parts. As you say, that takes years to get from first step to production pieces.
 

addaon

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2008
Messages
1,975
Location
Kanab, UT
Sure. But EVs first flying today won’t be certified until 2035 or so. Look at the pack-level (mass) energy density from a production EV in 2009 compared to today.
 

addaon

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2008
Messages
1,975
Location
Kanab, UT
10 years is pretty normal for a standard Part 23 project — and the first eVTOLs will not be standard, since part 23 only covers airplanes; right now these are being done through a negotiated approach which adds time and complexity. Wisk first flew around 2017, and they sure ain’t done yet.
 

Dominic Eller

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
273
rv6ejguy, How true, but with current technology approach, it may never be good enough in power or weight. What is needed is an entirely new technology, something I can't even imagine, nor it seems can anybody else at this point in time.
George

I think you might be right, something radical like zeropoint energy becoming a reality would be an interesting paradigm shift to witness.
One day but, not soon.
 

Aerowerx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
5,856
Location
Marion, Ohio
....What is needed is an entirely new technology, something I can't even imagine, nor it seems can anybody else at this point in time.
Imagine?? Certainly, yes. Like a sublight speed warp field drive.

I actually invented it one night, but when I woke up I forgot how I did it.😂
🤣
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,256
Location
USA.
Imagine?? Certainly, yes. Like a sublight speed warp field drive.

I actually invented it one night, but when I woke up I forgot how I did it.😂
🤣
Same thing happen to me when I invented the anti- gravity engine. Forgot everything. What happens when you wake up in a new world every morning. :) Just another day starting from scratch.
 
Top