Electric speed record plane.

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pictsidhe

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Some of you may have noticed that I tend to be a wee bit cynical of the latest renderware released upon the masses. That's because it rarely gets built, let alone lives up to predicted performance.
This one I'm passing on for you to get excited about as it being done by a well respected aero company: Rolls Royce.

Drool away
 

Topaz

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Yeah, this has been making the news rounds a lot this week. It looks very much like they've taken a Nemesis NXT and are putting in an electric powerplant. Makes sense for RR. They don't really design airplanes these days.

I would expect a lot of this PR-stunt type of thing over the next few years. Electric propulsion is a big attention-getter for aviation right now.
 

Tiger Tim

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It looks very much like they've taken a Nemesis NXT and are putting in an electric powerplant.
I like that it kept the vestigial bump on either side of the firewall where the cylinders would have been faired in. The turbine NXT kept them too.
 

plncraze

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I'm assuming all the info that has been out on the internet comes from the same press release. The Nemesis name hasn't been mentioned. Is this going to turn into the British version of the Iranian Cri Cri?
 

pictsidhe

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I did have a look at the press release section of RR's website, but couldn't see one about this. Must have come from somewhere.
 

pictsidhe

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750 Volts at 550 Amps, I doubt they can do that for 200 miles.
I've been wondering what the flight profile for the speed record will be.
Maybe climb to altitude, point straight down, level off and give it full throttle through the measured distance. Deadstick landing after the speed run?
 

DangerZone

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I've been wondering what the flight profile for the speed record will be.
Maybe climb to altitude, point straight down, level off and give it full throttle through the measured distance. Deadstick landing after the speed run?
If they stacked three of those Yasa 750 R motors in the nose of the Nemesis NXT which are 94% efficient 100HP continuous motors, this means it would use about one minute of the peak power output to climb (at a better climb rate then the original Nemesis climb rate), level off, fly at continuous speed for some time to cool it off, then point slightly down to reach top speed, break the record, and use the existing power to land safely down.

No need for a deadstick landing, electric motors adjust power to the load with the controller. The MTOW of the Nemesis NXT is 1180kg, the motor + controller pack is around 120kg, about a hundred kilograms less than the original Lycoming TIO 540 engine. This means any empty weight of 620kg and a battery pack of around 560kg. It allows enough energy to take off at 500HP, fly for 10 minutes, break the record, land easily in 5.

This is an approximation, I could do the math to see the whole flight profile in detail but there's no need, it seems they know what they are doing.
 

Tiger Tim

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I've been wondering what the flight profile for the speed record will be.
Maybe climb to altitude, point straight down, level off and give it full throttle through the measured distance. Deadstick landing after the speed run?
I think they changed the rules for speed record setting after Al Williams(?) did that. IIRC it now takes a level run at a set altitude before reaching the first timing gate.
 
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