Electric Self Launch Options

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PiperCruisin

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Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
247
Location
Idaho
True. Can you please demonstrate and measure this and present the data to the FAA and HBA members?
Maybe this:
Rockwell International OV-10A Bronco with rotating cylinders at the flap.
 

raumzeit

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
16
Just... I am affraid that FAA will not accept that. Part 103 means that you can operate the flying machine without pilot license. Can you imagine to fly without any experience with self launch electric glider like GP11e?
GP11e has wing area 7,4 m2 and MTOM from 256 kg. No flaps, just ailerons. Forget to allow to fly it to somebody without pilot license and without any experience with gliders.


Odd as it sounds, I think that's probably least problematic aspect of 103 compliance for the bird. There's quite a few 103-compliant aircraft that can easily pile up kinetic energy approximate to a GP11e, and that are if anything trickier to operate. Personally, I look at stuff like paramotors and am amazed even an unaccompanied minor can just go on eBay and load up a sketchy used example of maybe the trickiest most dangerous mode of transportation ever invented for like $5k ballpark and go pound it in without ever seeing one piece of paperwork. But that's just me lol.

I also find the lack of flaps on the GP11e to be it's biggest demerit. They say the aircraft is to attract "first time gliders" and so forth yet no flaps bumps all the minimums up and has said first-timer trying to touch forty-foot span onto field over thirty knots with no power and maybe two feet of ground clearance for the tips.

Yeah, you're right probably some of those are not gonna end so good. But that doesn't make GP11e "special" vis-a-vis Part 103 far as I can tell - at least no more so than dozens of others.
 

henryk

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Joined
Mar 8, 2010
Messages
6,324
Location
krakow,poland
CL over 4?
KASPERWING ( circa 10 kg/m^2) can fly in "vortex flow" regime with 5.5 m/s...

Cl=? =circa 5 (my calculation) !

"Is the 5.5 M/sec the "vertical Mush" vertical speed for the Kasper Wing (Cascade Ultralights) Ultralight? ?"

V vert. was not exactly measured, only estimated by fewe pilots as 900-1000 fpm...

=overlouds at landings are not comfortable !

-auer pilot,Wojtek Monycz was fly with HORISONTAL speed 18-20 km/h...

(circa 12 mph on float speedometer,


5-5.5 m/s on anemometer


+ in paralel riding bicycle )
 
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raumzeit

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
16
See all Appendix in 103.
Yeah that's interesting stuff; I had read through those previously and was pretty happy about particulars in how active-gadgetry like slats etc. can count towards stall req. and the (really interesting) latitude about artificial governors to control level speed (vs. power or power/weight defs etc.).

In relation to GP11 glider the empty weight makes 103 but the battery-weight does not. However "battery" could ~= "fuel" so 14kgs of latitude would emerge in the GP11 "making weight."

It's all kind of academic though for GP11 I think at this point because there's no massaging the stall speed to make 103 - it's simply too fast. There's another rig emerging from development in Europe, the e-Birdy, that looks really cool but also stall something like 63 km/h firmly puts it LSA.

On side note I've seen stuff about Aerola Alatus-M including other posts here; it really sums up the blurry world here being a little Frankenbird combo of sailplane cage clamshelled onto a ATOS-looking rigid-wing hangglider.

A neat concept with a lot of potential, I've seen one here and in Europe for sale and they're interesting for sure; could swap the heat-cycle power for electrics (there's official electric version but seems vaporware), toss in nice avionics, and ponder all kinds of wings - even all-composite wings - of one's own choosing down the road given it's configuration and mod-ability.

But I've got reservations in the details of how its built using the d-cells as part of canopy joint etc. Design looks like less hearing-the-wind than wings groaning as d-cell flexes in that joint along with the clamshell back; I'd love to hear yay/nay on that little bird from someone with any hours on one though.
 
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