electric powered paraglider cart

Discussion in 'The light stuff area' started by lr27, Oct 1, 2018.

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  1. Oct 1, 2018 #1

    lr27

    lr27

    lr27

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    I didn't get to see it fly, or even see the flying surface, but I thought some of you guys might be interested to see this ultralight. The designer/builder says, as I recall, it's about 170 lbs as shown, with enough batteries to fly for 15 minutes, but without the canopy, or whatever you call the wing. He said that more batteries might be carried. Note that the rear wheels are powered, so it can be driven on the ground. The 4 flying motors are on arms that fold out so the motors face for and aft. The motors are from T-motor. The kv is 80, and I seem to recall they were supposed to be good for 7 kW or so each.
     

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  2. Oct 1, 2018 #2

    WBNH

    WBNH

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    Can't find it now, but there was a youtube vid of it's taxi testing on uneven grass, then a circuit under a canopy. As I recall, it seemed like a goofball comedy, "Hey Guys, Watch This." It worked, but the banter made me wonder if I was watching a Darwin Award in progress.
     
  3. Oct 1, 2018 #3

    lr27

    lr27

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    I suspect it isn't a Darwin award scenario, though of course nothing is absolutely safe. The only thing like that was the weld at the bottom of each ring, which was 6061 with no heat treat. I think those rings are probably oversized anyway, at least in the air. Maybe not as a vehicle. Workmanship seemed to be excellent, and the guy seemed to know a few things.
     
  4. Oct 1, 2018 #4

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Looks pretty clever to me, but there needs to be some way of not having those propellers able to turn when they are near the pilot's arms. Otherwise it is a pretty clever design concept. If it can be classified as a roadworthy vehicle without the huge expense of "certifying" a regular car, then it could be a viable product.
     
  5. Oct 4, 2018 #5

    lr27

    lr27

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    Good point. I can't recall if or how the wires were rigged. I suspect it's possible to rig up some kind of plug or contacts at the pivot point which would automatically disconnect when the arms were swung back. I wonder if it can be classified as some kind of scooter if the speed on the ground is restricted to 25mph?
     
  6. Oct 4, 2018 #6

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    The "Scoot-Air" :)
     
  7. Oct 4, 2018 #7

    addicted2climbing

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    Looks fun, but it needs more range than 15 min. Does any time driving on the ground come out of that 15 minutes? If it were light enough to thermal than 15 min might be ok but it looks more like a flying parachute and not Paraglider. Either way still a clever design and maybe a 1st try to learn and his 2nd will be more refined.
     
  8. Oct 5, 2018 #8

    lr27

    lr27

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    He has more batteries than that, but I don't think he's flown with them yet. I'm sure that you can drive for a number of minutes on the same energy it takes to fly for one. How would you tell if it was a flying parachute vs a paraglider without seeing the chute? It's in a BIG bag, as I recall.
     

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