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Bill-Higdon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
1,186
Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
Restored, they are truly wonderful a/c. Nowhere near as fast as an RV, but every bit as nice to fly. The higher priced ones typically have either a 180HP+ Lyc, or the 210 Continental, with CS prop, custom (modern) cowl, and often have the 'Nagel' (sliding) canopy. Some are converted to sticks; most have 'P-51' gear doors with smaller wheels/tires. Most have one of several different aux tanks added, to have usable range with the larger engines. Just the STC'd Nagel canopy mod cost about $10K, 30 years ago when it was still available. So you can see how the 'value added' things can accumulate.

The unrestored ones typically have Continentals from 145 HP down to the original 85 HP (that one is....uncomfortable...to fly off a short grass strip in summer....
They can often have internal structure in the tail that's a mere ghost of its original self. And they are all 70 year old *retractable gear* a/c, with the expected maintenance complexities.

BJC, why did you have to post that? My wife now officially hates you. Can you PM or email me info on it?

Thanks,

Charlie
You forgot the center section being damaged by bad landings
 

rv7charlie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
Messages
1,454
Location
Jackson
~185 hrs in one while a partner in 'Checkerboard' (Swifters from the '80s-'90s will know the plane). 200 HP, CS prop, modern cowl, Nagel canopy, P51 doors, aux tanks, rebuilt tail, etc. Partner in the plane flew it in airshows, was later a member of Swift Magic acro team (with a different a/c). Hey, you asked... ;-)

On center section damage from bad landings: Certainly possible, but never came up as a worse problem than other designs while I was an owner. The oleo gear is quite forgiving to both hard landings and, with its wide stance, other landing 'issues', as well. But don't tell anyone; I need to maintain my 'super pilot' status....

Charlie
 

plncraze

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
2,005
Where is Chuck Lischer's Swift? The one that did the cool fly by behind the Sea Fury with the vortex smoke.
Thread drift? Never heard of it!
 

Dana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,790
Location
CT, USA
I recall reading in John Godfrey's autobiography The Look of Eagles where he said that after the war, he and Don Gentile (top US ace in the ETO) took jobs with Globe, flying the company demonstrator aircraft around. He (or they, I forget) quit after some bad experiences in the Swifts, but I don't think he related the details.

Are they truly designed to be aerobatic? Or are they "aerobatic" like a lot of old birds because the old CAR4 regulations don't prohibit aerobatics?
 

plncraze

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
2,005
There was an issue of Air Progress Aviation Review with Lischer's Swift as the cover story told what he had to do to make a legal air show plane. It took some effort.
 

rv7charlie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
Messages
1,454
Location
Jackson
I wonder what they were talking about, re: 'make it a legal air show plane'; I've never heard of that. I have several friends who have flown shows professionally, and they've never mentioned any requirements beyond having both plane and pilot 'paperwork' in order. I'll ask my neighbor about it next time I see him; he flew a clipwing Tcraft (in homebuilt category, no less), and a certified Cub in a car-top landing act for years.

It would probably be pretty difficult to find a Swift that hasn't been upside down (in the air) quite a bit during its life. I spent at least 75 or 80 hours (probably over a hundred) out of my 185 total in something beyond normal pitch/roll angles; I learned acro in it. They are placarded against spins, but Swifter lore says that is just because Globe didn't want to foot the bill for the required FAA testing to remove the placard. I never spun mine, but more experienced owners say that they spin (and recover) just fine.

Anyone who watched the SNF airshows in the mid/late 1990s likely saw the Swift Magic acro team (red/black Swifts with white top hats on the tail). They included a 'switchblade' maneuver which involves the three planes converging, one plane pulling up as the other two roll knife edge and pull away as they're about to 'intersect'. One of the pilots was my partner in Checkerboard. I rode with him to SNF one year, and we left the show immediately after their show sequence on Saturday. I threw my gear in the plane and he headed back to the active. He pointed at the G meter as we started our takeoff roll; it was pointed right at the 7 G mark. (Yes, I was a little uncomfortable on the way home.)

Swifts are certainly tough enough, if they're in good condition. Handling is certainly not an issue for acro.

Charlie
 

plncraze

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
2,005
Lischer talked about working hard to keep it light. He did not have any insulation in his plane. He also wanted an stc'd stick. Legal may have been the wrong word though. I need to read that article again.
 

Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
7,666
Location
Rocky Mountains
S.F. Hoerner: Fluid Dynamic Lift, Fluid Dynamic Drag

Not mine. I have copies, though not in as good shape. Seems like a reasonable price for both books?

 

Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
7,666
Location
Rocky Mountains
Are the Sprague type pumps used in aircraft?
I've used them in laboratory and testing settings but have never noticed one in an aircraft?

Might be fun to try for high pressure hydro-forming of aluminum/steel parts?
 

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