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EAA Sport Aviation vs. LAA Light Aviation (October 2020)

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BBerson

Light Plane Philosopher
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Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
13,958
Location
Port Townsend WA
EAA was supposed to be about aircraft, not flying stories like AOPA. But Jack could have told you that at the time. I sent Jack an article about a homebuilt heat treating oven I made. He replied with questions but never followed up after I replied.
 

Mad MAC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
685
Location
Hamilton New Zealand
These days the LAA will always be more practical than the EAA simply because they are responsible for the airworthiness of the UK's homebuilts. The move to kits from plans built has removed (or allowed them to lose) the EAA's function of broadcasting detail manufacturing information, which leaves it somewhat lost (what orginisation ever said lets reduce our income because we are no longer as relevent as we once were).

We shouldn't complain too loudly the EAA's biggest benieft at this level is we get solidworks cheap.
 

Mad MAC

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Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
685
Location
Hamilton New Zealand
Are there any statistics quantifying how many E-AB have been designed using Solidworks and flown?

BJC
I was thinking of the membership here. At the GA end of the market, most aircraft are designed in autocad, solidworks or inventor, etc, few can carry the cost of the high end packages like CATIA.
 

JimCrawford

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2019
Messages
10
Location
Oxford, UK
I dropped my international magazine subscription when I realised that much of the magazine had become about legislative representation in the states, which I'm sure is important to US members, but had lost really useful stuff such as the Bingelis 'how to' type of article in favour of supership content. The web, including the EAA and this forum, provides me with the 'how to' now, and I can skim the electronic version of the mag for interesting morsels. Even the LAA mag has the odd supership article but there is a strong rearguard action promoting the hands on builder with practical articles and content tends more to the 'less than 200hp' vintage restorations and homebuilt reports.

I keep my EAA membership (since 1975!) for access to the members part of the website and to support the EAA in general - but the magazine is now a minor part of my interest.

Jim

Tipsy Nipper (waiting on the Covid restrictions to go fly)
Taylor Monoplane (airframe complete, engine installation in progress)
Flitzer Goblin (parts sourcing and workshop prep)
LS4 glider (about to go into it's box for the winter)
Vintage glider (requires rework; lurking on persuading the owner to sell)

I read somewhere on the web that the perfect number of aircraft to have is "one more than you've got, one less than will cause a divorce"
 

gtae07

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2012
Messages
2,024
Location
Savannah, Georgia
Are there any statistics quantifying how many E-AB have been designed using Solidworks and flown?
I don't know about whole aircraft, but plenty of people are using it for panel and accessory design. If I didn't happen to have Catia available I'd be using solidworks for doing that stuff.

Useful things I've done with CAD on my project:

Aileron trim tab design
Tank vent inlet and plenum
Fuel selector mount
Various flat patterns
Many 3d printed mockup components and drill jigs
Alternator mount brackets and belt sizing
Panel layout (still doing this, I hate it--stupid ribs getting in the way.)

I'm glad at least the latest issues seem to have some of the old experimenter content, and there's some useful flying content.
 

robertl

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2017
Messages
218
Location
Heath Springs, S.C. USA
I'm pretty much like the rest of y'all, the last two SP magazines are sitting on a table, untouched, unread, I haven't even thumbed through them to see any pictures. Also, wondering if the $5.00 savings to get into A/V is worth the membership cost, although I want to support EAA and GA, I know I'm not really making any contribution. I stopped building the CH-701 to purchase a Cessna 150 Spam Can, I don't have time to do both, so I decided to fly while I still can. A couple of more trips to A/V and that might be it, I don't know.
Bob
 

Derswede

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
975
Location
Central North Carolina
Jack and Golda were almost always at any event in NC, esp. ones near us in the Charlotte area. So many great names gone, wish I had paid more attention when I was younger and got to hang out with many of those guys in the "old days."

Jack would swing by the hangers to see what had appeared since his last visit. Always was a nice guy, he was quite excited when we started on the TravelAir Mystery Ship. It is now hanging up in a hanger as the Delta captain who bought it after my dad's death passed also. Of course, I never tried to write articles for him, but Jack was always a stand up guy with us.
Very interested in homebuilt as well as restorations.

Derswede
 
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Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,590
Location
Seattle, WA
Now, about those publishers who turned down my novel, ....
Turned it down? I'm impressed. Usual practice these days is to say, "If you don't hear from us in N weeks, assume we are not interested." Consider yourself blessed if they actually take the time to tell you, "no."

Kinda takes the joy out of being a writer if you can't share rejection letters with your friends....

Ron Wanttaja
 

plncraze

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
1,916
Hello JimCrawford! Please write more about your airplanes here. A Gus Limbach design! Wow!!
 

plncraze

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HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
1,916
When I see that you guys have been rejected I am stunned. I always thought they were struggling for content.
 

Wanttaja

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Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,590
Location
Seattle, WA
When I see that you guys have been rejected I am stunned. I always thought they were struggling for content.
Bryon had mentioned novels (e.g., Fiction) and I responded in that context. I've only been rejected once for an aviation magazine article. I'll have to see if I have that one in the archives, IIRC it was a bit "icky" and I wasn't surprised when the editor turned it down. Didn't try anywhere else.

Novels though....sheesh. Got 15 rejections on my first one until I found a willing publisher. Second was a sequel, so no problems there.

Currently have a third novel (not a sequel) out on queries, looking for an agent. Send synopsis and sample chapter, ask if they want to see more. Got 10 rejections so far, plus ~20 where it's beyond the length of time to expect a response. Two have asked to see the full manuscript.

Ron Wanttaja
 

User27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
52
Location
England
I've written a few articles for LA, never got paid a bean! Agree that SA is focussed on the wrong stuff for me. That's why I get Kitplanes. Comparisons between LAA & EAA are not really valid. I have to be a member of LAA to own a homebuilt in the UK, no-one has to be a member of EAA. LAA membership is around 8000, EAA membership is 200000? The editor of LA is also a complete amateur, if I could opt out of the magazine and save a few quid I probably would. Kitplanes is the only option for an experimental aircraft focussed monthly update.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
8,510
Location
USA.
My fathers aunt had a book published when she was 100 years old. As most people know on his site, I am not much of a word smith, but I do have several chapters written of a book. Maybe if I get more time, I will get back on it. Written mostly of the history of my family back 5 generations and my life. Sort of different than most people.
 

Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,590
Location
Seattle, WA
My fathers aunt had a book published when she was 100 years old. As most people know on his site, I am not much of a word smith, but I do have several chapters written of a book. Maybe if I get more time, I will get back on it. Written mostly of the history of my family back 5 generations and my life. Sort of different than most people.
I strongly encourage folks to do this. It's so easy, now, vs. the way it was in the typewriter era. Sit down, and document what you've done with your life.

I did that when I retired...gathered up pictures from all my work projects and wrote up some of the stories around them. Turned out to be about 125 pages. Printed up a few copies for family and friends, got 'em spiral bound at Office Depot.

For those interested in writing for the aviation magazines, let me point you to my Avwriter's Primer:


Ron Wanttaja
 

plncraze

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
1,916
Great idea! I talked to someone who did this. His kids got it published after he died. Plus it lets you tell your story.
 

Twodeaddogs

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,006
Location
Dunlavin, County Wicklow,Ireland
My writings for magazines, various have included one for the ILAFFT inside back page (story of a near-crash) of PILOT, several flight tests (including air-to-airs), engineering stuff (like Malcolm's stuff in the LAA mag) and dozens for the ILAS (Irish LAA) newsletter and as, an Inspector, written flight manuals and POHs for homebuilts and microlights that have come my way. on an official basis, Ive also written reports/proposals for the aviation authority to get aircraft types accepted. I've even written a couple of tear-down reports for propellors and engines that were crashed. You stick around in small aircraft aviation long enough and you'll always get a chance to write stuff for publication.
 
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