EAA No Longer Has Free SolidWorks

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stanislavz

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One of our fatigue/fracture guys uses it to do quick analyses in lieu of having a reliable CATIA connection...and the results are on par!
Could you please explain this a little deeper ? FC have its is own FEA. But you can also use FC as pre-processor for Catia ?
 

cblink.007

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Could you please explain this a little deeper ? FC have its is own FEA. But you can also use FC as pre-processor for Catia ?
Our remote connection to one of the CATIA workstations across country can be unreliable (the main engineering offices are in Fort Worth, Texas, and we are up in the north-east US), so in lieu of that, we use the FEA functions in FreeCAD for some things, like initial post-test analysis. We have MATLAB at our disposal too, and alot of our guys here use that religiously!
 

SpruceForest

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Yes, and other than mostly certificated AC, the building portion was so light it almost floated away. The only thing that stopped it was that complete garbage comic insert which is laughably bad.

I don't think you ever read the 80s versions of Kitplanes or SA as they have decayed from valuable learning tools to 'look what some rich white guy did!'

The 80s Kitpanes issues were goldmines. The current Kitplanes is used to line a canaries cage.

Welcome to the 2020's. Every time I zoom in on a high resolution still shot or watch a 1080P video, I have to acknowledge that craft and technical knowledge is just a lot better conveyed in high def video and web sites where magazine word or page count will never apply, and in ePub or PDF where I can search for text, zoom pics, annotate, etc. Video and video/still photo-supported text is just a lot richer and more efficient at conveying information than a three page article with two 2" x 2-1/2" still shots.

What should a gas weld puddle look like on a tubing t-joint? Almost impossible to show in still, low res B&W photos or describe in text, but readily illustrated on well-shot video with quality voice-over. What is the relationship of various control system elements? Much better illustrated in a pull from a SW or Fusion image than mentally piecing it together with a dozen drawings scattered across a build table. Builder sites and craft/technical fora like this one have replaced mimeographed builder bulletins and the monthly pot-luck of print articles that was Kitplanes and Sport Aviation in the previous century. Do I miss the funky '70's and '80's typewriter-paste-up composition and thrice-copied, illegible pics? Sure. But only for the nostalgia buzz I get looking through the old stuff.

Don't get me wrong - while the print media business may be dying, it is still supported by dinosaurs like me that have a unreasonable attachment to the stuff that used to arrive in the mail every month. I get an electronic copy of a half-dozen plus a physical copy of three mag these days, which is about the same number as I got in the mail in the 1980's and 1990's. A little different with professional journals... between IEEE and AIAA, I was taking a half dozen journals in the 90's. These days, it's both cheaper and more efficient to have a search engine do the work and pay for the occasional PDF article. But my daughter takes ZERO mags, finds physical newspapers useless, and sees online periodicals as entertainment only. When she wants to learn something new, it's primarily through videos and only occasionally with the support of text or other legacy media.
 
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When se wants to learn something new, it's primarily through videos
Where does she reliably find videos that don't take 40+ minutes to present 5 minutes worth of knowledge?

YouTube was a wonderful resource. Today...........??? I'm not the fastest reader anymore but I find myself again looking for PDFs rather than video for new areas of study.

For things like manual skills, welding/riviting, video is queen. Standing next to a true craftsman is still king.
 

cblink.007

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Where does she reliably find videos that don't take 40+ minutes to present 5 minutes worth of knowledge?

YouTube was a wonderful resource. Today...........??? I'm not the fastest reader anymore but I find myself again looking for PDFs rather than video for new areas of study.

For things like manual skills, welding/riviting, video is queen. Standing next to a true craftsman is still king.
I see alot of that across the web. Try looking for a grilling recipe online, and the writer will open the page with a brief description of the food item in question...then goes into a multi-paragraph commentary on the history of the barbecue, the origin of the seasonings, etc, where you scroll down furiously across ads while trying to find the promised recipe. Obviously the reason why the article is structured the way it is, is that the author gets ad revenue for every single ad you breeze by. I am not a fan of it one bit.
 

cblink.007

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What should a gas weld puddle look like on a tubing t-joint? Almost impossible to show in still, low res B&W photos or describe in text, but readily illustrated on well-shot video with quality voice-over. What is the relationship of various control system elements? Much better illustrated in a pull from a SW or Fusion image than mentally piecing it together with a dozen drawings scattered across a build table. Builder sites and craft/technical fora like this one have replaced mimeographed builder bulletins and the monthly pot-luck of print articles that was Kitplanes and Sport Aviation in the previous century. Do I miss the funky '70's and '80's typewriter-paste-up composition and thrice-copied, illegible pics? Sure. But only for the nostalgia buzz I get looking through the old stuff.
THIS^^^

I compare this to the moldless sandwich composite book that Rutan did, which was great for initial exposure, but his video, as well as all of Mike Arnold's videos (hat tip to @Max Volume ) are what brought it all together for me.

Printed media is always good...but for actual step-by-step tutorial, for me, the videos do it, since I am more of a visual/hands-on learner. Crayons, Play-Doh, etc... 🤣

Then again, I am a former Marine, so...
 

SpruceForest

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Where does she reliably find videos that don't take 40+ minutes to present 5 minutes worth of knowledge?

YouTube was a wonderful resource. Today...........??? I'm not the fastest reader anymore but I find myself again looking for PDFs rather than video for new areas of study.

For things like manual skills, welding/riviting, video is queen. Standing next to a true craftsman is still king.
I absolutely agree with you. Served up with this banquet of information comes a bunch of tables laden with junk or just badly formatted and poorly presented content. Like any smorgasbord, it takes some time to find the stuff served up that is worth your time and interest. I will say that our descendants seem both better equipped technically in terms of filtering/selections skills than our generation, but inexplicably unwilling to apply themselves to the degree necessary to do so.
 

BJC

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So, times have changed (I even have a tailwheel rather than just a skid), and there are much better ways to deliver / receive the info that once was available in magazines. People who are unable to adapt, or choose not to adapt, lash out with complaints. Nothing new about that.


BJC
 

Hephaestus

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Standing next to a true craftsman is still king.
"Hired" (bribed with bevvies) a local to help with some layups - kid who's grew up in a family who liked to build composite boats.

My god, the stuff I learned in a couple days - minor things you can't pickup from videos, drape it this way it'll lay nicer, if you do it like this you won't trap bubbles, press harder, here press softer there, no you want it to look like this not that... Maybe in 4k video properly curated - you might get the messages across but some of the texture/gloss/sheen type stuff will never be learned that way.
 
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Maybe in 4k video properly curated
Maybe in the future, once we get virtual reality truly functional*. Today there is just no substitute for working directly with the master. They can spot things we students do wrong that they may never think of demonstrating in a video.

*For some things this will have to include smell, touch and temperature.
 

SpruceForest

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My first IP was Ray S., a late-60's, chain-smoking, foul-mouthed curmudgeon with abundantly evident digestive issues (FWIW, primary instruction was handled by contract flight instructors at the time to preserve mil drivers for more important seats). I only came to appreciate that unique, augmented cockpit learning environment (i.e., Hot Wing's "...smell, touch and temperature." thing) when years later a fully-laden turkey buzzard came through the left-hand chin bubble on a terrain flight hop. Both rotary inverters as well as the buzzard promptly converted themselves to smaller-sized components with the usual cause-and-effect chain in evidence with regard to the remaining, operative elements of the DC side of the electrical system.

On the mishap debrief at flight ops, my right seater stated that he'd never smelled anything worse in his life or had so much smoke and 'smoldering crap' in the cockpit (this from a guy that got shot down on a semi-routine basis in what was at that time the most recent SE Asian unpleasantness). I'd have agreed with him if I could, but I'd seen and smelled worse flying with Mr. S.

So yes - the most effective learning environment fully engages ALL of the senses.😉
 
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BJC

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My god, the stuff I learned in a couple days - minor things you can't pickup from videos, drape it this way it'll lay nicer, if you do it like this you won't trap bubbles, press harder, here press softer there, no you want it to look like this not that... Maybe in 4k video properly curated - you might get the messages across but some of the texture/gloss/sheen type stuff will never be learned that way.
The Glasair Aviation Two Weeks To Taxi program instructions have evolved significantly from the standard build instructions. Revisions have been based on questions / confusion / uncertainty of builders in the program. That, plus lots of photographs have made the instructions excellent.


BJC
 

AJLiberatore

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If you haven't heard...

"I wanted to reach out and let you know officially that we will not be holding Solidworks University this year at Airventure. With the changes made by Dassault to the 3DExperince program last year and the feedback we have received from members we have decided to discontinue Solidworks University at Airventure."

Heartbreaking. SW's has been a big part of my life, heck I did the 1st story on this when the news broke in 16', since then classes, training, volunteer, then becoming a introduction trainer for a famous Non-Profit. I am sorry I don't do this cloud thing, I want the files on my box to review my design tree etc, to hone my skills . I have a ton of models I made to get ready for the CSWA exam, models I developed when I taught, training files I never got too, and some B-25 I modeled which is another story. So unless I want to send them up to the cloud, they are now useless....

With all the world has been through, ya think Dassault Systems could have done us all a solid? No pun intended.

Look I get it, the word is the 3rd World has no trouble getting it, it must have been costing them a fortune, but for us hobbyist? Name a decent price to get the full maker space on my laptop. Let's say $365/yr. Ya can't make margins on that? It's serious enough of a price point, that you'd use it if you were a hobbyist, yet big enough to perhaps to keep the cheaters away.

I get it, I am not ungrateful, it was a blessing and thank you, but to end this way?....
 
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SpruceForest

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Autodesk (Fusion) just bumped their pricing for a year, but still have the edu/startup 3 years free deal.
 

rotax618

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As suggested previously, the simple solution is to transfer over to Freecad, provides the same ,and in some cases far more features for zilch-nil-nocost-free-$0, with no restrictions and the program and drawings-models are on your computer and can be exported in dozens of formats.
 

Monty

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As suggested previously, the simple solution is to transfer over to Freecad, provides the same ,and in some cases far more features for zilch-nil-nocost-free-$0, with no restrictions and the program and drawings-models are on your computer and can be exported in dozens of formats.
And it runs on Linux.

I am so frustrated about CAD. The absolute best CAD I've ever used was Unigraphics, pre-NX around version 15 circa 1998. Before the sketcher crap. It ran on Unix. Unequaled to this day, and I've used just about everything. If I could just get back to that, I'd be happy.

Currently using Rhino, and Alibre. I like them, but they both are hopelessly stuck in Bill Gates nightmarish, dysfunctional OS....I blame his Mr. Roger's sweater wearing smarmy self....among other things..

Solid Works has become a nightmare too. No big loss. I hate the work flow and menu structure. It's horrible. Didn't used to be that way. Dassault "improved" it.

I'm watching Free Cad with interest. I even have a computer I'm going to install Linux on and make it into a FreeCad machine when I finally get to it.

Monty
 
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