Ducted Fan Pseudo-Jets

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Woodenwings

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Aug 2, 2006
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As much as new designs are exciting and good for daydreams....i am guilty of it too. There are good designs made for production....problem is there was no market for production versions of some...and other reasons....so now perhaps homebuilders might?

Check out this brilliant guy and all his designs.

Hanno Fischer
 

Woodenwings

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Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
236
Location
Toronto
As much as new designs are exciting and good for daydreams....i am guilty of it too. There are good designs made for production....problem is there was no market for production versions of some...and other reasons....so now perhaps homebuilders might?

Check out this brilliant guy and all his designs.

Hanno Fischer


Notice the straight wings as previously discussed!

 

misterstax

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Jan 25, 2022
Messages
16
Hey Malish, I really like the Dreamer...I think I'd like to get in line to order one. Is it in production? The footage I've seen online is intriguing. I'm going to be building a shop/hangar and could use advice on its design, configuration, and equipment. I will probably have a lathe, as well as some light milling capability but not a large milling machine or rivet press. But definitely the basics; a table saw, band saw, drill press, small bending brake, ans so on.
 

raytol

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Dec 17, 2021
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206
Why not a Sadler Vampire?

I build the Sadler Vampires in Australia. What DF or jet could I look at putting in it? The original Part 103 SV-1 had a KFM engine at 28Hp, the Australian ones have had Rotax 447 40Hp and HKS 65Hp engines. Unfortunately, my website is down at the moment!
 

Blackhawk

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Apr 18, 2008
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AUSTRALIA
raytol,

You could do somthing like this for the single seater,

smaller diameter 5 blade prop in a propeller shroud could improve the thrust up to about 30% for the same power (65hp)
 

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Malish

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Oct 11, 2013
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Russia. City of Volgograd
Hey Malish, I really like the Dreamer...I think I'd like to get in line to order one. Is it in production? The footage I've seen online is intriguing. I'm going to be building a shop/hangar and could use advice on its design, configuration, and equipment. I will probably have a lathe, as well as some light milling capability but not a large milling machine or rivet press. But definitely the basics; a table saw, band saw, drill press, small bending brake, ans so on.

Unfortunately our plan to start production of our kit-build PJ-II "Dreamer" aircraft in 2021 have changed(mostly because Covid-19 epidemic), now we're looking to start it's production by the end of 2022.
To build our kit aircraft, all you will need is the regular mechanic hand tools and some tools to work with composite - because most of kit aircraft parts will be already made and all you need to do is to assemble them.
Because some airframe composite parts are relatively large(wings and fuselage) you will need shop space something larger than two car garage to assemble and store them - shop/hangar would be OK.
 

Riggerrob

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Location
Canada
raytol,

You could do somthing like this for the single seater,

smaller diameter 5 blade prop in a propeller shroud could improve the thrust up to about 30% for the same power (65hp)

Dear Blackhawk,

A ducted fan would improve thrust at low airspeeds.

I am not sure why you added a tiny canard to your sketch - of Sadler Vampire. That would help if the center-of-gravity is too far forward. However, most small pushers suffer from the opposite problem: C. of G. too far aft. This is because the engine has to be mounted aft of the C. of G. to position the propeller aft of the wings' trailing edge.
 

Blackhawk

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Apr 18, 2008
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AUSTRALIA
RR,

I didn't add the canard; it was a picture I downloaded off the internet years ago.

I think it was for a Flight Simulator.

The vampire is a low speed aircraft and could benefit from the ducted fan type installation
 

misterstax

Member
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Jan 25, 2022
Messages
16
Unfortunately our plan to start production of our kit-build PJ-II "Dreamer" aircraft in 2021 have changed(mostly because Covid-19 epidemic), now we're looking to start it's production by the end of 2022.

Understood, Covid has been a real problem everywhere; my daughter was quarantined just 3 weeks ago and finally tested negative last Tuesday. That should give me plenty of time to get prepared. Do you have an estimate of the production time start to finish?

To build our kit aircraft, all you will need is the regular mechanic hand tools and some tools to work with composite - because most of kit aircraft parts will be already made and all you need to do is to assemble them.
Because some airframe composite parts are relatively large(wings and fuselage) you will need shop space something larger than two car garage to assemble and store them - shop/hangar would be OK.

Thanks, that gives me an idea of the size and layout, probably 25 feet by 25 feet or a little bit more, with a 12 to 15 foot high ceiling, I'm thinking, because of the need for the stabilizers to clear with landing gear down. Working with composite...by that do you mean setting up, laminating, shaping, finishing?
 

Malish

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Oct 11, 2013
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Location
Russia. City of Volgograd
Thanks, that gives me an idea of the size and layout, probably 25 feet by 25 feet or a little bit more, with a 12 to 15 foot high ceiling, I'm thinking, because of the need for the stabilizers to clear with landing gear down. Working with composite...by that do you mean setting up, laminating, shaping, finishing?

With outer wings panels and horizontal stabilizers removed aircraft width about 8'
With landing gear down to the top of vertical stabilizers aircraft about 10' tall. But to cycle landing gear on the ground aircraft need to be jacked up about 2' more.
For exact aircraft dimensions see our website:
PJ-II Dreamer - dual controls light aircraft
Working with composite - gluing panels, laminating seams and do finishing work. All instructions for assembly will be in manuals supplied with the kit.
Our assembly manuals is not ready yet, but here is one chapter of manual for Lancair Legacy kit aircraft - to give you some idea what it's will look like(see attachment).
We're estimate assembly time will be about 2500-3000 man/hrs.
 

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BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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97FL, Florida, USA
Met a fellow once who had a short wing Piper (clone?) with a Ford V8 that he was trying to sell. The asking price was ridiculously low for a flying airplane. He said that he wanted to get rid of it because he was tired of working on it (he had several hundred flight hours on it), and he just wanted to go flying.

Anyone know how many V8 auto conversions flew into Oshkosh?


BJC
 

nestofdragons

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Joined
Jun 8, 2016
Messages
757
Location
Near Antwerp, Belgium
I asked specifically Chevy Van engine...cause they are practically free after driven 180 000 miles. Lots of parts etc.
Hmmmm ... so ... you start a flying project by saving most money on nearly the most important part of the project. The engine. Is that a wise decision?

My personal opinion: if it is no longer reliable for the road ... can it still be reliable for getting you to high places?
 

Riggerrob

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Sep 9, 2014
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Canada
I asked specifically Chevy Van engine...cause they are practically free after driven 180 000 miles. Lots of parts etc.
Yes, you can purchase old van engines for next to nothing, but - with that many miles - they need a complete over-haul. By the time you complete the over-haul, you will have spent a few thousand dollars.
For example, older engines tend to have worn, loose-fitting piston rings that reduce compression (equals horsepower) and allow blow-past, which dirties oil.
My car recently passed 180,000 kilometers. Up until recently, the engine oil stayed straw-colored between oil changes, but now is turning black. Time for a new engine. Since the body has accumulated 15 years of minor dents, it is not worth replacing the engine.
 

Bigshu

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KCMO, midwestern USA
I asked specifically Chevy Van engine...cause they are practically free after driven 180 000 miles. Lots of parts etc.
Lol, you get what you pay for. With an engine conversion for flight, that "practically free" engine may cost thousands. Corvairs are a great example, VWs less so. You can get core engines for peanuts, but by the time you go through it and make it a flight engine, you could easily have between 5 and 10K in it. Or more...
 

Sraight'nlevel

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Nov 4, 2021
Messages
386
Hmmmm ... so ... you start a flying project by saving most money on nearly the most important part of the project. The engine. Is that a wise decision?

My personal opinion: if it is no longer reliable for the road ... can it still be reliable for getting you to high places?
Yes yes....but they run usually 300 000 miles. So plenty or hours left. Spark plugs etc must be new to get the mileage right but still something to work on...and tunable from 117 hp to 650 hp....with new parts and tweaking.
 
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