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Dream workshop?

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Vigilant1

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Regarding the use of EPS in this type of construction and the objections raised to it: How does this system below get around those? Like the thermal bridging where the edge studs meet?

Normally the bridging would be reduced with an inch or so of XPS or EPS affixed on the outside of the metal studs (or, more likely, on the outside of the sheathing) and covering all exterior walls. Then house wrap or a drainage plane. The outer cladding (siding, lathe and stucco system, etc) goes outside of that. Drywall goes inside and is required as an ignition barrier.
This outer continuous foam insulation layer really improves thermal efficiency of the structure, and I believe it may now be a code requirement in many places for wood stud construction, too. Old time framers don't like it because it complicates window and door framing, etc.

ETA: The marketing video also didn't show any shear panels that would resist wall racking. There would need to be sheathing or diagonal bracing/straps to accomplish that. Doesn't show the real world details of electrical runs, piping and DWV, etc either.
 
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TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
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Memphis, TN
I am visiting someone and staying in his hangar.
Generous room for two airplanes, easily put a third in without effort. Radiant heat floor, I’m actually hot in there. Back wall to about 20 ft out is work shop including bathroom. Above that is a two story apartment. Small kitchen/ dining, living room, full bath on main floor. Upstairs large bedroom, full bath, sitting area. Two people could easily live here. His house is 20 ft away. Overhead crane that can move to any reasonable spot in the hangar. This place is nice.
 

Pilot-34

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Apr 7, 2020
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Lol I lived in a ex gas station for a while , it was sorta the ultimate man cave.
Two bathrooms both designed to be cleaned with a fire hose.
Fridge with glass front- see if your low on beer at a glance
Air conditioner and air compressor located in the shed 50 feet from the garage For nice and quiet working conditions!
A car hoist in my living room (1stbay). Ment lots of friends stopping by.
Overhead crane in my living room (2nd bay)
40 foot tall road sign became My welcome Iight!
The washbay was also the garage-my car was never cleaner!
Picnic table playground huge sandbox waiting area meant the kids didn’t complain if the fathers got to talking and hung around too long plus a nice place for cookouts on the weekends.
Three walls of glass and three huge overhead doors plus windows that open in the other walls plenty of light and ventilation
Lots of outside concrete work space.
Best part ?
Toss up between free gas or
No electric bill !
Never did figure that one out but When I inquired about putting the electricity in my name both electric company said there was no service at that location. I always wondered if it had something to do with being at a weird spot where either electric company could’ve serviced it or if the nationwide brand was still paying the electric bill or if the guy before me had some how hooked up to the electricity on his own?
Small town so the cafe was across the street and the farthest business was a block away!
 

Hot Wings

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Rocky Mountains
That is getting to be a problem for me too. I'm old enough to have been raised by the generation that went through the depression and a lot of their philosophy of not wasting anything has stuck with me. In the past I could give away a lot of things...........at least somebody could use them.

With the new fascination with home delivery I'm finding it harder to give away things of even saleable value. It's just to much trouble to take the time to drive 15 minutes to pick it up. I rarely go to the land fill when I don't see something I could have used, or in fact did buy in the last 60 days just waiting there in nearly perfect condition for the D-10 to fulfill the 'dust to dust' mandate.

I've got a stack of floor tread I removed to repair the stairs saved with the intention of using it for verticals on some wood ribs. It is all premium grade Douglass Fir. I'm probably never going to have the time now to build such a set of ribs. I've offered it to a couple of others but they would rather buy new pre-cut Spruce. I just can't bring myself to toss it in the stove............much less the trash.
 

Jay Kempf

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Warren, VT USA
Like most homebuilders I like to experiment and try different methods for structures. I also know know that what's been done before many times usually works bets but it's not always the the best for a particular set of requirements or budget. In the US 2x4 stick built houses predominate not because of any inherent merits of that type of construction but because it's cheap. If you look at cookie cutter housing developments you see this type of construction because that what what's cheapest and makes the greatest profit for the developer. Not becaue it's any good. And because of ingrained "that's we always did it" mentality. I simply dislike that type of construction and the cost of lumber has shot up recently here to stupid levels.

I'm still fine tuning my metal stud/foam panel idea and I think it works for my shop idea, not so much for the hangar. Regarding those panels: I realize the area between the studs might need horizontal reinforcement to transfer windloads to the studs on the edges. I'm currently working to 30 PSF for the worst case areas, combined with the axial loads from the trusses. The manufacturer does give maximum loads in tables for these conditions which I only found after laboriously hand-calculating them! Still it was a useful double check.

Regarding the use of EPS in this type of construction and the objections raised to it: How does this system below get around those? Like the thermal bridging where the edge studs meet?

I built my entire house out of Thermasteel with concrete decks and panel roof. The stuff is pretty fast and relatively cheap. Concrete deck got me spans that I would have to have gone to lightweight steel beam commercial style construction. I have only one beam. This allowed me 24' spans in my shop without posts. All the walls even below grade are of these panels. It's a crazy structure but that's how I play. The concrete decks all have foam rim panels so they are inset a couple inches from the outside walls. R value is ridiculous. It was all done in a factory to my plans of course I had to revise around their methods of construction. I looked at commercial panels, SIPs, stick framing, steel frame curtain wall, etc... this stuff won hands down. Have been very happy with the results.
 

Riggerrob

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Sep 9, 2014
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Location
Canada
Clear peg-board?
Where can I buy clear peg-board?
My new apartment has a work-bench below two large windows. The windows provide great light of working on small parts, so I don't wnat to block my windows.
OTOH I still like hanging tools at arms-length above my work-bench.

Don't feel bad if you don't have a source because I have an annoying habit of askign for tools 2 or 3 years before they are invented. I have built my own parachute rigging tools and driven the local Snap-On Tools dealer to drink by asking him for tools that he does not stock ... or telling what he will stock 2 or 3 years in the future ... like the enhanced welding mask that can be tuned to colour-code temperatures as you weld.
 

Jay Kempf

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Clear peg-board?
Where can I buy clear peg-board?
My new apartment has a work-bench below two large windows. The windows provide great light of working on small parts, so I don't wnat to block my windows.
OTOH I still like hanging tools at arms-length above my work-bench.

Don't feel bad if you don't have a source because I have an annoying habit of askign for tools 2 or 3 years before they are invented. I have built my own parachute rigging tools and driven the local Snap-On Tools dealer to drink by asking him for tools that he does not stock ... or telling what he will stock 2 or 3 years in the future ... like the enhanced welding mask that can be tuned to colour-code temperatures as you weld.
You need a laser cutter. Just cut a peg board in Plexiglas.
 

Lendo

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Feb 6, 2013
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Brisbane
In my shed with Channels and Battens, that the roof and wall sheeting attaches, it's impossible fill the gaps, so insulation is moderate, but so to is the Brisbane weather. So it's enough to take the extremes of heat and cold, but certainly not good enough for Really extreme weather. There is a product that could do the Job it's Colourbond steel both sides with variable thickness Polystyrene between. It is however more expensive and usually used in self supported Patio roof structures, the thicker the Polystyrene the stiffer the panels, which just click together.
George
 

Lendo

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Feb 6, 2013
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Brisbane
The best buy I have ever seen is a chap bought a Fire Station, It wasn't that old but too small for the growing area, I don't know how many sheds they have, but boy am I envious. I can only assume what's in there.
George
 

BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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12,314
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
My ideal workshop design had Cyprus paneling, a Maple floor and a wood-fired heater / stove. The chemicals that I use (MEK and Acetone) made me forego the heater; cost eliminated the paneling and the floor.

I do have a small TV that I listen to, and occasionally glance up at.


BJC
 

Chris Matheny

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Nov 26, 2019
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164
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St. Paris OH
I have less than $400 in the projector setup. It's a used office projector from ebay but does really well with video. $27 led's of amazon and a cheap screen off amazon and I built the frame from lowes. I'm cheap.
 
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Chris Matheny

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Nov 26, 2019
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St. Paris OH
Do they place a thermal insulator , (under) the concrete ; for
a heated floor ?

Bille
Yes, there is an interlocking 2" high density foam underlayment with a plastic green coating on top with raised pucks for the water lines to snap into. There is also 2" foam all around the foundation 24" deep to keep the sides from losing heat. It was a big initial investment but heating 3500sqft to 58-60 (feels like 65 with this type of heat) I only use around 500 gallons of propane per winter in central Ohio. I have 12' sidewalls with vaulted trusses with a 17' center peak.
 

Pilot-34

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Apr 7, 2020
Messages
662
My ideal workshop design had Cyprus paneling, a Maple floor and a wood-fired heater / stove. The chemicals that I use (MEK and Acetone) made me forego the heater; cost eliminated the paneling and the floor.

I do have a small TV that I listen to, and occasionally glance up at.


BJC
Yeah I do the TV thing for background noise on the other hand when I want the place rocking I’ve got a Bose radio it’s amazing what thAt does with two tiny speakers!
 
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