Draco died today

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Dan Thomas

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Yes, technically more if a wind issue than a momentum swing issue, though some momentum MAY have been involved in the continuation of the turn away from a weathervaned direction.
Dragging the downwind wingtip turns the airplane, usually. Taildraggers have a harder time of it, with the ground attitude putting the wing at a considerable AoA for the wind to grab and lift it. Even with all the aileron into the wind it might not be enough to keep the upwind wing down.
 

Victor Bravo

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Not the kind of airplane that insurance cost is one of the yes/no deciding factors. It may not have been a Mustang or an F-86, but it was certainly a "rich man's toy" where NONE of it made sense financially from the start.
 

ScaleBirdsScott

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Almost anything cool doesn't make financial sense. But then not everything should make financial sense. Sometimes you gotta spend some resources just to make some things happen and sometimes that result is important or valuable even if the money to get there was a bit excessive.

Not sure whether Draco was the right mix of all that, but it seemed to make a lot of people happy and impressed a lot of non-pilots so I'd say for all of the cost, it was probably worth trying.
 

Speedboat100

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It will be interesting to see if he rebuild/builds new, but I’m thinking maybe not. He’s already proven the concept, and probably has other new designs in the queue that he wants to build. At this point, the only reason to rebuild is if his Draco airshow appearances are highly profitable for him.

He has mentioned a racer this year.
 

TFF

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Draco hung around the smaller STOL planes being king of that group, but really it’s more in line with the Sherpa with its size and capacity.
 

Speedboat100

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Draco hung around the smaller STOL planes being king of that group, but really it’s more in line with the Sherpa with its size and capacity.

In my hometown there was an etrepeneur who had a business jet, helicopter and a Vilga...all was bigger and better. Vilga is impressive.
 

don january

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You know I've seen a Piper Pawnee go into the ground twice and at a much higher speed and had much less damage at the end of the ride. I was not impressed on how the WAF and struts held up. I know the Nevada desert is some hard a$$ ground but old Draco sure gave up the ship when it hit the ground.
 

radfordc

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You know I've seen a Piper Pawnee go into the ground twice and at a much higher speed and had much less damage at the end of the ride. I was not impressed on how the WAF and struts held up. I know the Nevada desert is some hard a$$ ground but old Draco sure gave up the ship when it hit the ground.
I guess Draco was built to fly well and not crash well.
 

BoKu

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You know I've seen a Piper Pawnee go into the ground twice and at a much higher speed and had much less damage at the end of the ride. I was not impressed on how the WAF and struts held up. I know the Nevada desert is some hard a$$ ground but old Draco sure gave up the ship when it hit the ground.
It was interesting to observe that both wings appear to have broken right at the side of body, with little sign of distress to the rest of the wing. Usually when you break a cantilever wing like that, there is distress (crushing, wrinkles, etc) further outboard. This might mean that the wings are simply way overbuilt, and simply failed where the moment was the greatest--in which case there is clearly margin for some weight savings in the wing. But it might also mean that the wing had little margin at the inboard end. It would be interesting to see what reinforcements they added to the wing structure.
 

Daleandee

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I considered posting my thoughts on this video but after reading my longer post ... I deleted it. In short, I believe (and it seems Mike would agree) that this video belongs in the "Don't Do Anything Dumb" thread.

Dale
N319WF
 

Scheny

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As for crash behaviour, a turbine is very slow in reaction. Once you move the lever, it takes a few seconds to spool up and another few to come down again.

In a normal accident, speed is decreasing quickly, here it still accelerated when it hit the ground.

You know the experiment where you hang a brick to a thin rope and another thin rope below the brick? Pull slowly and the upper will fail, pull quickly and the lower will fail instead.

This is, why our Microjet we develop right now, is designed with crash safety.
 

Dennis DeFrange

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Once the krap hit the fan , the only control he had was throttle . Don't think the brake pedals were of any use .
 

BBerson

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I think the elevator would work. Probably best to raise the tail so the wing wasn't a big billboard sail. (or kite as he called it)
 

jedi

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Once the krap hit the fan , the only control he had was throttle . Don't think the brake pedals were of any use .
I believe the elevator and rudder were both still working. When the ailerons don't work the rudder is the backup. When that doesn't work the elevator will remove the wing lift.

I am trying to recall if the new wing tips had the slat extended. I would like a report on what stall tests were done with the new wing tips.
 
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BJC

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Once he made the decision to takeoff aligned with the runway, with a strong, direct, crosswind, the preferred technique became one of preventing lifting of the upwind wing by accelerating on the runway while maintaining directional control to an airspeed where ailerons are effective, and only then smoothly rotating to leave the runway. For most of us, the natural temptation is to get into the air ASAP, but that is the wrong thing to do.

With the huge propeller spinning CW (from behind), rising the tail rapidly will cause the nose to swing left; conversely, pulling back on the stick to rapidly rotate will cause the nose to swing to the right, i.e., to downwind. If done at minimum flying airspeed, the ailerons are not effective, the wheels are no longer on the ground resisting roll, and the wind blows the airplane downwind, and rolls the airplane. The lift decreases, and the airplane sinks. Repair bills follow.


BJC
 
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