Draco died today

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Dana

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Apparently the wind was 29 gusting to 39... which is around Draco's stall speed. Bad decision to take off, but I guess he knows that now. I suspect it was a case of "gethomeitis", coupled with complacency, since the plane's absurd power to weight ratio made it possible to power out of many dicey situations, just not this one.

He said something about insurance for flying it at airshows was $45,000 per year (ouch!) It wasn't clear whether he had dropped the insurance or not. In another video he said he had over $1,000,000 in the plane, not including labor.
 

Rockiedog2

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I been there. 3 groundloops with brake out on one side and xwind the wrong way, no damage; the plane should have been grounded; guess who the mech was. One the tailwheel got in a crack on the runway, sold it for salvage. Crashed my Legal Eagle backwards and sideways in a corn patch, had it back going in about a week. Stood my Legal Eagle on the nose at OSH with about 3000 folks hanging on the fence, that was the dumbest of all. All but the crack in the runway were my fault. Like the Draco guy, just take the blame and move on. He gained respect from how he handled it. Wrecks happen, none of us are invincible...the more we fly the more exposure to Murphy so high time means more risk exposure. Well, that's my rationalization anyway. LOL
 

TFF

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To me it looked bad once he started to roll. It did not look right on the runway. It almost looks like the wind is opposite of what he thought it was. He owned up to it bigger than most would. Super lucky no one was hurt. Being such a public eye airplane, he was not going to be able to hide anyway.
 

BBerson

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It looks like the left wing is higher while holding. Taking off toward the crowd/ramp is a bad idea especially at an airshow.
 

Rockiedog2

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That's called "Crashing in style"
Should have taken a bow
Didn’t think of it til later

One of those groundloops was in a Bamboo Bomber. Slow motion graceful groundloop. What a queen, even did pretty groundloops!
 
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cdlwingnut

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All I can say is Mike is a class act.
The man screwed up, BUT he admits it, he is honest with his report, I heard no cuss words in the video I'm sure if it were me i'd have dropped at least one F bomb unintentionally. I am glad he or anyone else was not hurt, He is more than capable of building another awesome airplane.
If you read this MIke, thanks for sharing Drako with everyone and thanks for putting this video up so others can learn from it.
 

Scheny

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Draco already almost tipped over when he was standing. If the noise would have showed into the wind, it would have taken off due to the gust.

Takes a real man to admit one's fault, my deepest respect to you Mike and happy you are unhurt.

His new project "Scrappy" is a modified carbon Cub frame with shortened nose to accommodate the highly tuned racing engine he had on the Legacy before turning it turbine. The silhouette is unchanged, so the engines goes back so much, the firewall touches his feet. The belly and door area is also improved to handle the loads.

The prop is a four bladed carbon speciality which looks like he stole it from a container ship. It is built to convert 350hp into pre thrust at standstill.

BR, Andreas
 

Turd Ferguson

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I read elsewhere Draco's airshow days were over due to insurance woes
He said something about insurance for flying it at airshows was $45,000 per year (ouch!) It wasn't clear whether he had dropped the insurance or not. In another video he said he had over $1,000,000 in the plane, not including labor.
If he insured the plane for $1 mil, $45k is 4-1/2% of the hull value. If he is insuring replacement value, it's even less. All things considered, that's not out of line. If someone can invest over $1 mil in a recreational airplane, $45k would be little more than chump change. (I'd estimate his annual fuel bill for the plane is about the same). There are Cirrus owners that pay 3% of hull value so 4-1/2% it's not terribly out of line.
 

TarDevil

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If he insured the plane for $1 mil, $45k is 4-1/2% of the hull value. If he is insuring replacement value, it's even less. All things considered, that's not out of line. If someone can invest over $1 mil in a recreational airplane, $45k would be little more than chump change. (I'd estimate his annual fuel bill for the plane is about the same). There are Cirrus owners that pay 3% of hull value so 4-1/2% it's not terribly out of line.
I'm not speaking from first hand knowledge, so take everything I say as grapevine information...
I understand from other internet chatter that a couple unlimited contenders withdrew from Reno due to additional insurance premiums in excess of one grand per race lap. I wonder if Mike's insurance provider also slapped additional premiums for his airshow appearances?
 

TFF

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Insurance is hitting hard right now. It seems it’s coming from grounding the MAX planes to fix their losses. I was told the company insurance we pay is going up 20% next year. Insurance is it’s own self regulating stock market. Percentage of profit will be maintained. If pay out a lot, raise rates to match.
 

pictsidhe

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45k a year insurance for draco was really cheap. Odds of a mishap seemed higher than the insurers bargained on. Likewise with Reno, those are pricey aircraft that have frequent mishaps. Insurance is legal gambling, nobody would play if the odds skewed too far one way.
 

dapug

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Serious question: would this really be considered a ground loop?

Even a trike gear would have crashed the same way. The wing lifted and the entire belly of the plane was tossed by the wind like a toy. A crosswind issue. This was not due to inability to control the swing of the tail ahead of the mains due to tire-grab or loss of control on pavement, so I'm struggling to see why people are chalking this up as a ground loop.
 

TarDevil

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Serious question: would this really be considered a ground loop?

Even a trike gear would have crashed the same way. The wing lifted and the entire belly of the plane was tossed by the wind like a toy. A crosswind issue. This was not due to inability to control the swing of the tail ahead of the mains due to tire-grab or loss of control on pavement, so I'm struggling to see why people are chalking this up as a ground loop.
Agree.
 

bmcj

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Yes, technically more if a wind issue than a momentum swing issue, though some momentum MAY have been involved in the continuation of the turn away from a weathervaned direction.
 
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