Don't really know what to do from here...

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Holtzy3, Mar 8, 2014.

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  1. Mar 9, 2014 #21

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

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    If you have a partner that's an A-hole just trade your time with a bigger A-hole student let the two A-holes battle it out, If that Partner is the next to fly just fart a lot before you park it, As for instructors? Dime a Dozzen ,Find one who will deliver the goods.
    Went through 8 instructors, The students are just stepping stones in the business.
     
  2. Mar 10, 2014 #22

    Brian Clayton

    Brian Clayton

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    As far as faster/complex planes. My instructor put it to me like this. In flying you "crawl, walk then run". You NEED the hours in the slow planes to make you competent in the faster planes. A lot of what you are doing while learning is building "muscle memory". Its learning to do things so they become second nature....while you are still in a plane that will allow a little time to fix minor mistakes.

    As far as the CFI..... find another. Some are just flakey for various reasons.....
     
  3. Mar 10, 2014 #23

    tspear

    tspear

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    Never listen to old pilots/mentors who always say step up slowly. :D

    Here is the reality, flying an airplane is about the combination of information processing and reacting to the information. It is the the intersection of the information processing and the pilots reaction which determine how/good/bad/indifferent a pilots skills are. Since information processing, reaction time, reaction processes, fight/flight responses... are very dependent on the individual; the ability to learn new skills is therefore very dependent on the individual. You can use averages to determine if you are advancing your skills, and maybe as a metric to see if the instructor is milking you for miney. But never use averages to determine how fast or slow you should advance your skills.

    Now onto you questions: Find an instructor that one, has time for you. Second, make sure the instructor keeps challenging you. Third, find a second instructor to compare lessons against. Fourth, everything any pilot tells you, or the instructor tells you to do, ask why. Understand why you should do something, many tail dragger pilots will advocate and teach you to side slip against the cross wind. If you want to fly a 747, you better learn to crab the plane instead, if you side slip more then a few degrees that wing tip and outer engine will be in the ground. If you want to fly a Cirrus or many jets, you better learn to have almost no flare and land slightly nose high and fairly flat. If you want to be a bush pilot, learn to stay on speed for those critical short takeoff and landings.... As for skills I just named, if you want to know why; you better learn to ask.

    Tim
     
  4. Mar 10, 2014 #24

    Pops

    Pops

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    I question your passion for flying. You might want to fly, but just don't have the passion for flying like a lot of people. A student pilot and bored? Do you think you are that good as a student pilot? I have been flying since 1970 and flew for a living for a lot of those years and have flown over 85 different aircraft and it still thrills me to just go around the pattern in anything that flys and I'm still learning and sometimes think that I'm still a student pilot. I have never been bored one single minute while flying.
    Every flight should be a new learning experience, if its not, go do something else. Get time in as many different airplanes as you can because each one will teach you something new and made you a better pilot. If your skills are not increasing, they're decreasing. That's just the way it is. Sorry if you think I came on a little strong, but sometimes its needed. Dan
     
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  5. Mar 10, 2014 #25

    cheapracer

    cheapracer

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    You have quite obviously never lived in Asia! :speechles :gig:
     
  6. Mar 10, 2014 #26

    tspear

    tspear

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    Pops/Dan,

    (Was not sure which salutation you wanted :D)
    Not always is the problem passion. The first couple of flights I did with an instructor were very boring. I switched instructors to one who will challenge me and have not looked back.

    Second, you have to ask what is the passion for. Is it to soar like a Hawk and ride the thermals? Or is there another driver/motive?

    Tim
     
  7. Mar 10, 2014 #27

    Pops

    Pops

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    Makes no difference what direction he goes in aviation, he needs to be challenged, like you said, and strive for perfection. If you do that, you will never be bored. Like I said in another post, you will never be good, just better, ( a lot better if you put your heart into it). Glad you switched instructors. My instructor worked my tail off. He wouldn't let me quit until I did it right. He had been an instructor since 1937 in aircraft, sailplanes and aircraft on floats. Wish I was 1/2 as good as he was. I started out working in the ground crew at a large glider club and got paid with flight instruction in the Super Cub tow plane. Lots of fun. I was fortunate. Dan
     
  8. Mar 10, 2014 #28

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    Holtzy, if you are bored in the 150 at this stage of the game, then you are not challenging yourself. There is a lot of learning and honing of skills that can be done well past your private checkride... even in a lowly 150. Work on refining your approaches, your flare, your engine out procedures, and even just your basic turns and straight & level flight. Practice your short field, soft field and crosswind takeoffs and landings. Practice your visual sight picture like where the horizon sets in your field of view for different flight regimes and power settings. Learn how to estimate your altitude by visual cues on the ground (i.e. - when do fences, people, cars, become easily seen and identifiable). Learn how to sight far into the distance on your landing flare and how to end up with the yoke slowly pulled to its aft stop just as your wheels touch. There is lots to learn in any plane you fly, and the 150 is no exception.

    As for your instructor, if his style or schedule doesn't work for you, then find another... no hard feelings. Multiple instructors can give you a wide variety of experience.

    Apollo's suggestion was a good one about finding licensed pilots (ones whose flying skills you trust) to fly with you for added experience and stick time.

    As for your partner (you know which one I mean), he has little recourse for petty complaints unless you have a written partnership agreement that gives him that power. Best to remain polite but let the petty rantings roll off your shoulder. The worst he might be able to do is take you and the other partners to small claims court, and if the rest of you put up a united front, then the judge would likely see him as the problem. The best solution, however, is for the partners who do get along to buy him out of his share for the original purchase price (or less... after all, it does have a scratch :gig:).

    Bruce :)
     
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  9. Mar 11, 2014 #29

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    Good advice. But let's a add a bunch of stuff that often kills pilots, especially private pilots:

    Stalls entered from a number of scenarios, including climbing turns, skidding descending turns, sharp pull-ups (below Va, as a guy might do in a buzz job or taking off and holding it low and then zooming upward; some guys wouldn't believe how dangerous that can be), and so on. See this one and hear the stall horn blaring at 90 knots, in a 172 that stalls at 49 or so:
    GoPro HD: C172R Stop and Goes with Dad - YouTube

    Get familiar with what load factors do to stall speeds. Study and understand thoroughly Angle of Attack; your life depends on it.

    Simulated IMC. Lots of it. With an instructor, of course. VFR pilots going into cloud very often end up real dead.

    Low-level turns in a strong wind to see the illusions caused by drift and experience the tendency to slip or skid the airplane to get the sight picture right (a mistake. Pay attention to that ball).

    Navigation. That one fails a lot of PPL candidates. They can't estimate a heading for a diversion. Or calculate mentally how many minutes to the destination at the current speed.

    Forced approaches are another major failure exercise. The student ends up short or long or forgets about the wind.

    Study and understand carb ice. The textbooks and the instructors are woefully weak on this killer. Google it.

    Weather. Nobody ever knows enough about weather. Get the Jeppeson weather text and study it. You should be able to predict what the wind is going to do by 10 AM or whatever, or what a small temp/dewpoint spread might do to your visibility when the sun comes up and hits that wet ground after a summer's night rain.

    And so on.

    Dan
     
  10. Mar 11, 2014 #30

    Workhorse

    Workhorse

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    I'd add, try using your nose-horizon reference only to hold your exact altitude. Try guessing accurately (within 5 min max) your ETA to a waypoint just using your flight time, airspeed and wind info. Try guessing your crosswind component enroute using your chart and a rule, same for ground speed. Try calculating your remaining fuel in the tanks to the liter based in your flightime. Try puting the wheels in the exact point you chose and never letting the centerline go beyond any of the main wheels. Try calculate in wich point your wheels would be in the air taking off, try making the roll shorter. Basically learn which are your limits rather than the plane's.


    (Btw, in my PPL first 300 mile solo, the usually disconected A/P circuit breaker was connected... :whistle: so I took a relax from all the work mentioned above).

    (edit, another interesting thing is try following your engine fail/restart procedures sitting in the plane with your eyes closed, not flying of course)
     
  11. Mar 11, 2014 #31

    Pops

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    Isn't all of that, just learning to fly? Dan
     
  12. Mar 11, 2014 #32

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    It is, but you'd be surprised at how many students are getting away with an absolute minimum of that stuff. They learn too much by rote (like pulling the carb heat on downwind because it's on the checklist, and not understanding that carb ice can happen at many other times) or they think stall speed is always the same number, or they rely on the GPS to get them wherever. Too many schools teach to pass an exam, which requires a minimum of skill and knowledge, rather than teaching students to be excellent, knowledgeable and capable pilots.

    It shows in the accident investigations. Ignorance of simple, basic stuff is wrecking airplanes and injuring people.

    Dan
     
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  13. Mar 11, 2014 #33

    Pops

    Pops

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    Isn't that the truth.

    I know a flight instructor that doesn't know the difference between a mag switch and a master switch. I learned the hard way when he ask me to prop his airplane when he ran the battery down. Can't tell you how upset I was. So far he has ran out of fuel 5 times and totaled 2 aircraft. He flys for FED-X. If I had rat that I wanted dead, I wouldn't let the rat fly with him. Dan
     
  14. Mar 11, 2014 #34

    Holtzy3

    Holtzy3

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    Haha Well I'm not like that! I've taken 3 different ground school courses and I've always adored and studied aviation for as long as I can remember. My mom says my first flight from Montreal to San Fransisco when I was 18 months old was a breeze, Didn't cry at all and slept the entire flight! She thinks that's when it all started! I sometimes feel like I understand more than other student pilots but I honestly don't like saying that because I know no matter how good you are at anything there is always someone out there better than you... Unless your Chuck Yeager... :D

    Anyways I flew both Saturday and yesterday for an hour and a half each and worked on various things like cross wind landings, short field approaches/landings and general pattern work along with some stalls and emergency procedures. I scheduled a XC for tomorrow with my instructor so we'll see what happens.

    I remember on a post on the second page someone suggested covering (or disabling) the AI and fly by visual reference, It's actually funny, For the first 9 months of flying the AI in our airplane didn't work so I always did everything according to visual reference. We got it fixed about 2 months ago and I just kept flying visual.

    Any who Hopefully Ill get some more flight time pretty soon in some other airplanes (hopefully a friends 185 on tundra tires) that will be an experience. All in all I think flying this weekend really reminded me of why I started flying in the first place. There's just no feeling in the world that can beat it.
     
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  15. Mar 11, 2014 #35

    Workhorse

    Workhorse

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    (Shh, we're luring him into keep on working his skills).


    I somewhat got tired of low powered planes also but my aim already was cropdusting. I don't recomend this, it's tired, dirty, dangerous but challenging. You can have plenty of andrenaline but many unwanted as well. I've never felt nothing like my first flights on duty.
     
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  16. Mar 11, 2014 #36

    1Bad88

    1Bad88

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    Holtzy,

    I think that dealing with instructors is one of the universal challenges to flight. I was ready to push through all of my training to complete my PPL in July / August of last year. I got my ticket on 2/3/14. Get some time in actual IMC with your instructor if at all possible; it's an eye opening experience. I thought that I was ready to start my instrument ticket but it showed me how ill prepared I am for that experience with so few hours. I like the suggestions for flying as many different planes as possible; our Archer flies a lot different than a 152.

    Ignore the A-hole partner for now, there's nothing he can do. Leave the plane in the best condition possible (seat belts fastened, centered in the parking space, etc.) with full fuel and you have fulfilled your responsibility.

    Pops - I got bored 45 minutes into Saturday's flight and then there was a slight engine burble; no more boredom for the remaining hour and a half.
     
  17. Mar 11, 2014 #37

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    A lot of the older guys here learned to fly in airplanes that had nothing more than an airspeed, altimeter, turn-and-bank and a compass, plus a tach and oil pressure and temp. That was it. It's still possible to buy a new airplane that way. Too many modern students have their heads down when VFR, fooling with all the doodads, and bad things happen. Like midair collisions.

    That 185 will show you how much there is to learn about airmanship. And the next airplane after that will challenge you more. You'd better have your biceps and feet in shape for the 185.

    Dan
     
  18. Mar 11, 2014 #38

    Pops

    Pops

    Pops

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    Flying on instruments with an airspeed, altimeter, turn-and -bank, (not turn coordinator), compass, tack and oil pressure and temp. Radios was a 90 channel tube radio com and a VOR, NDB. This will make you really learn the compass.
    Has anyone used a Narco coffee grinder ? Dan
     
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  19. Mar 11, 2014 #39

    bmcj

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    Yep, and the old ADF with the big loop antenna, listening in on the AM radio stations as you flew toward them. :grin:
     
  20. Mar 11, 2014 #40

    Pops

    Pops

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    Listening to the radio was what they were for. Every try a NDB approach in a strong crosswind when you had to fly outbound from over the beacon and then make a procedure turn back inbound ? Yep-- they are for listening to the radio. Dan
     
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