Do you need a tractor to do a loop?

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HumanPoweredDesigner

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I would think a pusher would be much less stable during a loop. Is that right?

Also, how hard is it to make an airplane than can do a loop? I'm sure it needs to handle more G's, and needs a lot more power for the weight, and strong control surfaces. Are there any ultralights than can do a loop? I read that even a moderate accelerated dive can be catastrophic for many ultralights.

I know there are bi planes than can do loops, and I think they can do them slowly too.

The nice thing about a pusher is it is more friendly to a canard, and maybe will pull less air pass the cockpit for a more quiet ride, I think. I just wonder if it is bad for acrobatics.
 

vortilon

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I have never flown an airplane that could not do a loop. The ultralight in my avatar was somewhat aerobatic, loops rolls and inverted flight with the engine shut off. If loops are done within the g limits of the airplane then they are safe. Maybe not legal but safe. :roll:
 

Dana

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As vortilon said any airplane can do a loop... pushers, tractors, even gliders. A pusher with a high mounted engine might have a bit more trouble as the high thrust line tends to pitch the aircraft down, but it still can be done.

There are a few aerobatic ultralights, and even those not specifically designed for aerobatics can usually do some mild aerobatics (including loops) if the pilot knows what he is doing. However, some older ultralight designs weren't as strong as they should have been, making aerobatics a bad idea.

The light weight and high drag of ultralights can pose a problem... they lose speed very quickly, so it can be difficult to carry enough energy to get over the top of a loop or complete a roll. The upside of this is that it's hard enough to gain enough speed to pull really high g loadings

There are no regulations prohibiting aerobatics in ultralights. Unlike N-numbered airplanes, it's even legal (though not very smart) to do aerobatics at ground level.

I'm currently designing an aerobatic ultralight biplane. It will be a pusher, but a mid thrust line (engine between the wings).

-Dana

"The difference between death and taxes is death doesn't get worse every
time Congress meets." -- Will Rogers
 

Smutny

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There are three "traditional" ultralights that come to mind that are aerobatic.

Two are tractor designs, the Phantom and Hurricane. The third, and first one, is the Quicksilver MX Super that is a pusher. There are some good YouTube videos on all three.
 

Smutny

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I'm currently designing an aerobatic ultralight biplane. It will be a pusher, but a mid thrust line (engine between the wings).
Sounds interesting, do you have any info online regarding your progress?
 

bmcj

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Burt Rutan used to do an aerobatic routine in a LongEze. I have flown the aerobatic Qucksilver (single seat, clipped wings, 50 hp). It would loop but, as Dana said, airspeed still bled off fast. Overspeeding was never really a concern because of the drag, but weight and balance was. I was at the minimum weight to keep it balanced and found myself having to carry a lot of forward stick at times.
 

Dana

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Sounds interesting, do you have any info online regarding your progress?
It's in this thread.

-Dana

They say that people who don't read history are condemmed to repeat it. Unfortunately, people who DO read history are condemned to watch it replayed by don't..
 
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