Quantcast

Do it nice do it twice

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
rudder elevator.jpg For those builders who are considering building with wood you should in some areas be ready to build twice as in the rudder and elevator of a Taylor mono plane. After the main structure is built per plans you are in a spot of do I go for smooth lines or just let the fabric lay as it may. I have chosen to try and level all plains out to get a smooth clean airflow so I in a way have to build the structure twice and if a person was to know this it could be done with the first pass of the construction but would be rather tricky with the support gussets being glued in place. I think with a good program and pre -cut parts it would be not to much of a challenge but in this case you don't have a kit to build from. I have started the process of filling the low areas of the elevator as I did the rudder with good Balsa. A person needs to remember that the strength of the part is built into the first part of the build with aircraft grade wood and per plans and the balsa is a helper in strength but is mainly just for shaping and unfortunately adding some weight. I pre-cut the balsa needed for the filling of the rudder and weighed them and it added 6 ounces of wood to the rudder not including glue but at a estimated 7-8 oz. gain in total weight I believe it is well worth the extra work and strength not to mention the finished product looks once covered. One great thing I find in a wood aircraft build is your not limited in how high/wide you can go with the wood as long as you start the part according to plans. I usually just post My plane build in project logs but it is nice to hear comments from fellow members of the Forum so I got my head gear and knee and elbow pads on ready to hear from you all:).:pilot:
 

MadProfessor8138

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
877
Location
Ekron,Kentucky
Don.....after helping others build several wooden aircraft I was always disappointed when the owners wouldn't go the extra step to produce a clean airframe.
There was nothing wrong with any of the aircraft structurally but a little attention and effort towards details would have produced a more cosmetically & aerodynamically appealing aircraft.
Maybe some people like seeing gussets under the covering...but I don't.
Now that I am building a RW19 Stork that will be my personal aircraft... I fully intend to go the route that you have chosen with your build.
When the airframe is built by the plans the structural integrity is there...now you just have to make it look good.
Kudos to you for being detail oriented and going the extra step......

Kevin
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
8,273
Location
USA.
Yes, Details, details, and details. Makes a huge difference. Always liked that airplane, thought about building one before building the KR-2. But after thinking that I am a wide body, would be a tighter fit. Didn't think about making the fuselage an inch or two wider.
 

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
I have found that when your working on the smaller details you have a better chance of coming across something in the wood or routing of the next phase of the build that may have been missed at first and in a couple of cases I discovered there was or is a better way to do the job. That brings me to Nice and Twice. It seems every project of the build will be mounted then unmounted especially on a all wood build providing you have a removable tail group even the main gear and tail wheel will need to come off a time or two but in one way this is a good thing you have a chance to look over hardware or add some varnish or balsa to get things feeling and looking stronger and straight. The trick is don't let it get you feeling and saying "Oh man not AGAIN" :(
 
Last edited:

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
I have found that when your working on the smaller details you have a better chance of coming across something in the wood or routing of the next phase of the build that may have been missed at first and in a couple of cases I discovered there was or is a better way to do the job. That brings me to Nice and Twice. It seems every project of the build will be mounted then unmounted especially on a all wood build providing you have a removable tail group even the main gear and tail wheel will need to come off a time or two but in one way this is a good thing you have a chance to look over hardware or add some varnish or balsa to get things feeling and looking stronger and straight. The trick is don't let it get you feeling and saying "Oh man not AGAIN" :(
Reminds me! the wife says the same thing every time I speak of needing more EPOXY
 

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
Here is something that a builder should think about while building out of wood. Ok you have your tail feathers/ailerons all built up and ready to cover but you ask yourself " is the glue going to hold and is the wood up to the task" ? well that's when nice and twice plays a big part. You know the control needs to be covered and no way of seeing how it will hold up in flight. Well there is one more way to check the integrity of the part. You mount it back on the airframe and connect cables or push pull tubes and get in the cockpit and lets say for instance the rudder you start by pushing the rudder pedals quickly left and right and the sudden stop and changing direction 180 degrees puts a large amount of stress on the structure along with the pedals or control stick what ever the case may be and what control surface your testing. I believe the rudder takes the most abuse and if the elevator is not balanced and the stick slips out of your hand while low taxi speed or just parked the elevator can take a hard hit at full down travel. This action does give the builder some idea of how things are holding up such as glue joints and wood strength. But actual forces will be greater in flight and no real way to test until your in the air. I think this test would help test parts even if its tube and fabric or all metal aircraft but all metal aircraft would be much more harder to see the interior of the control surface.crash.jpg
 
Last edited:

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
Started elev and got trailing edge done. and all other caps for the bottom cut ready to glue. Need one or two good sanding before fabric. Notice how the gusset's get flattened down some to get a elev 10.jpg straight surface.elev 10.jpg
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
19
Some of that depends on the design, too. In a design that can't afford an extra pound, six ounces of balsa here and there, and over there too, and maybe a layer of fiberglass over that while we're at it, to make it pretty and smooth, adds up to an airplane nobody wants to fly. I'm reminded of a nice-looking single-seat Maranda. . .
 

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
Some of that depends on the design, too. In a design that can't afford an extra pound, six ounces of balsa here and there, and over there too, and maybe a layer of fiberglass over that while we're at it, to make it pretty and smooth, adds up to an airplane nobody wants to fly. I'm reminded of a nice-looking single-seat Maranda. . .
I agree with the particular plane your adding weight to and it is easy to get weight on fast so it depends on the builders choice on just how far he or she wants to go. most planes have a 25lb luggage area and I gladly give up 5-10lb of that for a more airflow smooth aircraft. Let me ask have you seen the rudder of a Taylor-mono after hours of flight time off a grass or paved strip ? the raised gusset's under the fabric sure play's heck with the fabric as it does with the elevator. Comes right back to do it nice do it twice but in this case your recovering the control surfaces more often then needed. ;) plus most builders who worry about a pound or two are trying to stay under 254lb empty
 

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
Here is a photo of the HZ stab and elevator detailed and ready for hinges. I have decided to go with stock KR-2 elevator hinges. Just waiting for some ply for the rudder base and HZ stab to be shipped so working on little odds and ends that need to be done.tail group finished.jpg
 

pictsidhe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
7,973
Location
North Carolina
As someone else with a 254lb limit, but also a bit OCD, I'd compromise on the balsa by having balsa fillets. Probably under an ounce then to just take those sharp corners off the gussets.
 

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,820
Location
Midwest
In my build log I asked a question about a scale J-3 Cub. Also "do it nice do it twice" related I spoke of Shure bump guards used for mounting the upper forward cowl panel. I thought I should give a picture of where they came fromz shure.jpg It's the two bars by the lift handle near bottom left corner of pic. They are very nice Alum bar stock and great for drilling and Tapping. There is already 3 mount holes counter sunk to lock down to longerons. Puuuuuurrrffect. :pilot:
 

Latest posts

Top