Discusion Thread: Raceair Skylite Build and sub-kit developments

Discussion in 'Aircraft Design / Aerodynamics / New Technology' started by addicted2climbing, Mar 22, 2019.

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  1. Mar 22, 2019 #1

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    Hello All,

    This will be the thread where people can ask questions, offer advice and such in relation to postings in the build log titled: Raceair Skylite Build and sub-kit developments.

    I just made my first post so have a look and let me know what you think. I will post updates as I move forward. Also trying to finish my Zigolo to make room for the build of the Skylite so for now much will be virtual work in Solidworks and or small things that don't take much space. Zigolo should be done by summer and I hope to get going on the Skylite immediately after.

    Keep it clean and as much as possible on topic...

    Marc
     
  2. Mar 22, 2019 #2

    Hot Wings

    Hot Wings

    Hot Wings

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    links yield - "you do not have permission to view" or similar error message?
     
  3. Mar 22, 2019 #3

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    Thanks for the info. This new forum has a learning curve. We see if I can figure it out. please try again in a few min and let me know if it works
     
  4. Mar 22, 2019 #4

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    I think I fixed it. When an album is made the default is only owner can view it. I changed it to everyone.
     
  5. Mar 22, 2019 #5

    Hot Wings

    Hot Wings

    Hot Wings

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    Looks fixed!
     
  6. Mar 23, 2019 #6

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Looking forward to the post updates.
     
  7. Mar 23, 2019 #7

    GeeZee

    GeeZee

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    Looks good! I’ve been thinking about the best way to flute the upper half of the rib (that forms the airfoil shape). I’m thinking a template with the airfoil shape, then I could just hold the rib piece up to the template and flute to match.
     
  8. Mar 23, 2019 #8

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Cut a thick wooden "male" rib curve shape with depressions sanded into it with a Dremel sanding drum. Then cut a "female" wooden curve to match.

    Sandwich the strip of flat aluminum tightly between the male and female halves of the "mold, and clamp everything down to the bench.

    Take your plastic hammer and form the rib, tapping the metal into the flute depressions as you go. Basically the opposite of how you would form a solid sheet metal rib with a fluted flange. This way you are making a rib with a "fluted web" more or less.

    Now the Skylite rib flange has a 45 degree bend in it too, so you might need to have another wooden form and clamp saddle with a chamfer on it to bend that.
     
  9. Mar 23, 2019 #9

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    VB,

    Building the skylite rib in that fashion would be difficult due to how they are made. I tried to draw out a blank for that very same method and it does not work will since the rib is broken into separate upper and lower surfaces and not a single sheet with top and bottom. However, the sheet metal shop I had make the blanks is playing around with a few ideas to find a way to supply me a pre-curved upper surface portion. He is a local shop and use to make ultralight parts in the past for other people. For now I will try my hand at building a traditional rib per plans. If he manages to sort it out, I will modify the plans and or jig as needed to accommodate the pre curved part. Also needs to be cost effective and the current jig will work with builders who want to bend their own rib blanks. In an attempt to get the cost down, I am playing with 3D printing nylon (bit of a learning curve) to make the widgets. Also playing with glass filled and standard PETG as its easier to print and still has good mechanical properties.

    Marc
     
  10. Apr 6, 2019 #10

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    I have posted an update in the build log... Have a look...
     
  11. Apr 6, 2019 #11

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Looking at the black and white rib drawingm it really looks like making that upper piece at a low price, in quantity, is going to be difficult. Those ribs look like they were designed for individual fabrication by the builder, where time was not a big concern. The big iggue even for a scratchbuilder is going to be making an even, identical set of rib parts. I can't imagine being able to turn out quantities of those rib caps without a "production" quality set of steel stamping dies. Yes it is definitely the lightest way to make the rib, but the cost of that specific design is high in time or complexity.

    Three ideas come to mind:

    1) Our friend John at the airport has experience and resources with casting. Between your ability to design and draw the mold, and print a plastic buck for sand casting, and his ability to understand and manage the casting process, you can come up with a steel rib form that has the flutes in it on one side and the 45 degree flange on the other side. Put a strip of aluminum in it, clampt it in place with a strap or toggle clamps or a female airfoil shaped edge clamp, and hammer the material over and into the flutes. Then move the hammer to the other side of the rib and hammer the 45 degree flange into it. The 45 degree flange will probably have to have a few flutes in that too.

    2) Go to a 2 piece riveted upper rib cap, as the cost of using 25% more metal on that one part. Probably a 10-15% increase in weight for the finished rib.

    3) Use a Kolb style rib which is riveted together out of small diameter tubing. You can supply pre-cut gissets and stamped aluminum widgets (the Kolb uses these already), and your customer can crank out a rib in fifteen minutes, bending the upper rib cap over a simple plywood form by hand. .
     
  12. Apr 6, 2019 #12

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    VB,

    This Rib jig is for the home builder so slow home fabrication is OK. The jig just makes it easier and a more repeatable process. Only the upper curved portion takes some skill but Ed says once you get a few under your belt they go quick. Before I radically change the design, I may as well try and build them per plans and see how it goes. I have a local machine shop looking into an easier process as well as he has some ideas he is trying out.
     

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