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de Havilland wing tips

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Tiger Tim

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There must be a theory behind doing the tips that way, even if by the time the Leopard Moth came out they were probably just the corporate shape. That approximate shape traces all the way back to the DH-1 of WWI.
 

Aerowerx

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Do you actually mean Hoerner wing tips? They were developed by Dr. Sighard Hoerner, a WW2 Fiesler aero engineer. After the war he was invited to come to Wright Pat AFB in the USA, where he developed the wing tip that bears his name.

Their purpose is to reduce or control the wing tip vortices. This reduces the induced drag of the wing.
 

Victor Bravo

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No, I think he means the "sheared" Dornier style wing tips.

Amazing how that picture of an 80+ year old airplane at that angle looks so much like the popular E-AB Zenair CH-701, but still even the worst looking DH airplane is 100X prettier than the best CG design !
 

BBerson

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The DH53 has sheared tips. It reduces tip flutter instability with the sweep back.
 

Bill-Higdon

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No, I think he means the "sheared" Dornier style wing tips.

Amazing how that picture of an 80+ year old airplane at that angle looks so much like the popular E-AB Zenair CH-701, but still even the worst looking DH airplane is 100X prettier than the best CG design !
Very True, and 1,000,000 better than some Farman designs
 

mcrae0104

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Good observation on the Leopard Moth wing tips, I had not noticed that plane's tips before. Dornier notes in their literature (see p. 20 of linked file) that the raked tips enhance the pressure distribution and reduce vortex drag. For more on the topic of pressure distribution and spanwise flow, Wil Schuemann's article A New Wing Planform with Improved Low-Speed Performance is a good read.

I think it is interesting to contrast the tips of a DH Albatross, which are also raked, but opposite of the Leopard Moth. This leads me to believe that the DH85 probably had this planform for stylistic, rather than aerodynamic, reasons.

havilland_albatros.gif

Edit: Name of airplane corrected. Thanks HITG for pointing that out.
 
Last edited:

hole in the ground

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Ok just need to pop in to point out that the aircraft in posted by the OP is not a:
Fox Moth (DH 83)


or Humming Bird (DH 53)


[dh fanboy mode off]
 

Mad MAC

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The wing tip shape on the DH85 could be to do with the fact that the wings fold and pointed tips would have reduced the total wing area assuming the design limit was for the wing tips not to protrude beyond the tail.

 
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