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Daniel Dalby (APEV) Staggerchel

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cluttonfred

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Daniel Dalby of APEV in France (Pouchel, Demoichelle, Cubchel, Scoutchel, etc.) has a new (to me) project for a side-by-side, tricycle-gear, staggerwing biplane microlight called Staggerchel.

The prototype is being built by an association called Appel d'Aire ("Call of the Air," which also means a strong draft) that provides inspiration and job skills to young people. There is a FAQ and build journal, both in French, and the journal has many pics but has not been updated recently. Daniel mentioned just last week in the Pouchel Yahoo! Group that the fuselage fabric was being applied, so the kids are still making progress.

Details are limited at this point, but from the FAQ I can glean a few numbers: 250 kg empty, 450 kg gross, 120 kph top speed, 65 kph landing speed, 55 liters of fuel, 3 hours endurance, 200 m takeoff run and 100 m landing rollout. Construction is a mix of aluminum, wood, foam and fabric and it looks like a Rotax 582 or similar two-stroke for power.

From the strut arrangement in the sketch and Daniel's prior practice, I suspect that this one also uses an NACA 23112 airfoil for both the fixed lower wing and the differentially-variable incidence upper wing, which uses the wing halves for roll control rather than ailerons, as used in Daniel's other designs like the Dragon single-seat biplane pictured below. That is actually a nod to Daniel's Pou-de-Ciel heritage since the 23112 was the airfoil recommended by Yves Millien and used by Gilbert Landray and others to reduce pitch trim forces in Mignet types. I am pretty sure that Daniel uses it on all of his designs including the Pouchel series.

staggerchel.jpg DSC01258-1024x768.jpg dragon.jpg

20170503_143459_entoilage_staggerchel_1.jpg 20170503_145504_entoilage_staggerchel_2.jpg DSC02480.jpg DSC02966.jpg
 
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BJC

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The fuselage appears to be a wooden structure through the cockpit area, and aluminum angle aft of the cockpit. Interesting.


BJC
 

cluttonfred

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I asked about the mixed construction over in the French-language Pouchel group. Dalby's reply was, "It's simple, the Appel d'Aire association has a metal working shop and a woodworking shop." A comedian in the group joked, "It's a good thing that they didn't have a concrete shop." To which Dalby replied, "Then we would have made an airplane from prestressed concrete" and posted a brief article about the Breguet 910, a post-WWII radio-controlled glide bomb with wings made from...concrete!

Tests showed that the steel-reinforced concrete wings were 15% heavier than sheet metal for the same strength but the concrete wings required less than 1/3 the time to build. In the end, the guidance system was never reliable and the project was cancelled. Wouldn't that be fun, though. "Honey, I'm just going out to work on my concrete airplane." Your spouse/significant other would think you were cheating for sure!

Br910.jpg

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=6195.0

The fuselage appears to be a wooden structure through the cockpit area, and aluminum angle aft of the cockpit. Interesting.
 

pwood66889

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Well, I do know that some sail boats were built from concrete. If one had a bad encounter with a reef, just hove onto the beach at high tide, heel her over as the water receides and slather some ReadyMix on. Should set before water comes back and sail her home!
 

BBerson

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There was an Italian concrete airplane. Forgot the name.
I did help plaster a pair of ferro-cement sailboat hulls. Takes a full day with 5 workers. Cement boats are thick and heavy and out of style now.
 
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