Curtiss-Stinson Special

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scramjetter

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Thanks Lynn and JL,

I know the Knight Twister uses balsa blocks for fairing various structures so it had me curious in the case of the Flitzers.

Scramjetter, JLF's reply is exactly right (from Flitzer FAQ), being spruce framed with 2.0 mm ply boxed sides, faired front and back with spruce and with denser spruce root fairings spreading the loads out to the spars at 16" separation. 'Cheek' pieces of spruce are added to the ply sides to complete the airfoil section. They are similar to the more slender struts on the Lincoln Sport, but those are solid.
 

J.L. Frusha

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I'm not sure how much, yet, but the stagger will be more to a modern prescription for biplanes. The longer nose will be necessary for balance issues, which, in turn, will dictate the length (front-to-rear) of the undercarriage, along with the stagger.

the cabanes will be different, as I intend to use plug-in wings, much like the Hovey Whing Ding II and Pamperito, so I need a center section above the fuselage, anyway.

Suggested changes by @flitzerpilot :

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J.L. Frusha

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Katherine Stinson in her Curtiss-Stinson Special

1655578987141.png

The Curtiss-Stinson Special was built by the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, specially for Katherine Stinson. It was a single-place, single-engine, two-bay biplane intended for exhibition flights. The Special used the fuselage of a Model 10 Speed Scout fighter, new wings, and the tail surfaces of the JN-4 “Jenny.” It was powered by a water-cooled, normally-aspirated, 567.45-cubic-inch-displacement (9.299 liters) Curtiss OXX-6 single-overhead-camshaft (SOHC) 90° V-8 engine, rated at 100 horsepower at 1,400 r.p.m. A replica of this one-of-a-kind airplane is in the Alberta Aviation Museum, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
 

Tiger Tim

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I haven’t bothered pulling measurements or counting ribs or anything but those wings may just all be Curtiss Canuck lower wings. If the rest of the plane was made out of stuff they already had…
 

J.L. Frusha

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According to everything I've read, they are the lower wings from JN4s, mounted to the fuselage of a Curtiss S-3 (or S-10) Speed Scout, along with the vertical and horizontal stabilizers, elevators and rubbers from a JN4... per Ms. Stinson's special order.

That's the first image I have seen, where I could identify the wing tip shape. Given the shape of the tips, I believe you are correct, since this was before the JN4 'Standard'.
 

DanH

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According to everything I've read, they are the lower wings from JN4s,...

Stock JN-4D's didn't have lower wing ailerons. Canadian built JN-4C's had lower wing ailerons and half the stagger. However, nothing stock about the wings in the photo. The upper wings could be Canuck lowers with ailerons shortened one bay. The lower wings appear to be the same with one bay removed from the root.

...along with the vertical and horizontal stabilizers, elevators and rubbers from a JN4...

Photo appears to show a Canuck rudder. Common swap.

You ready to buy some EB Jenny plans?
 

J.L. Frusha

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The upper wings could be Canuck lowers with ailerons shortened one bay. The lower wings appear to be the same with one bay removed from the root.
Photo appears to show a Canuck rudder. Common swap.
You ready to buy some EB Jenny plans?

I still have an active 'Want-Ad'. Been shorted by others, but, yes, I'm still looking for a set to use for reference.

It may be a month before I can buy them, though...
 

J.L. Frusha

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I'm thinking a sort of shrouded front and then triangulate to a flat fuselage aft of the cockpit seat. Similar to the Mina of new Zealand...

1655679521623.png
1655679272264.png
 

J.L. Frusha

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Hell, I can use the same technique as making the Hovey Whing Ding II for the fuselage. and the same basic wing structure as the Pamperito variant. I'm just unsure of the final weight, until it gets built.
 

challenger_II

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I would suggest getting the weights of the materials and components involved with the specific design. This way, you have a good handle on how much the airframe will weigh. Building an airframe without figuring material weights is the quickest way to fail.
 

J.L. Frusha

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Working on it. Redrawing it, to go with the design change, so I actually have the correct dimensional data. I guess I'll have one of, if not the first biplane air-bike.
 
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