Crashes in the News - Thread

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D Hillberg

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Going forwards, yes I am aware. 196mph max speed. Wrenched on a few of them. But, going sideways, Mother Drag raises her ugly head. Again, them palm trees are really going to have a time dragging that banana sideways.
I'll even bet you believed those old phart 4-spot Chiefs when they said the AH-56 was the first supersonic helicopter...
I was there you were not, These tests were on going when I was shipped out to my home unit.
An empty Chinook with a ton on data equipment. My next ride was going to be a Cobra but a bad hanger bearing delayed my fun and I left before the run... The perks of doing an 8 week course in two... With an invitation to WAC school [ I already had a private helicopter certificate so "No thanks" ] Mother drag you funny "Hey watch this" and a test card sez over 200 with clean undisturbed air 70 degree day and a newby getting a ride.
Get your own bowl of Corn Flakes to pee in .
 
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I was there you were not, These tests were on going when I was shipped out to my home unit.
An empty Chinook with a ton on data equipment. My next ride was going to be a Cobra but a bad hanger bearing delayed my fun and I left before the run... The perks of doing an 8 week course in two... With an invitation to WAC school [ I already had a private helicopter certificate so "No thanks" ] Mother drag you funny "Hey watch this" and a test card sez over 200 with clean undisturbed air 70 degree day and a newby getting a ride.
Get your own bowl of Corn Flakes to pee in .
Well, I was there in a way. As a graduate of Mother Rucker I had the privilege to fly OH58s, UH-1s, (D, H and N variants) and CH47s (B,C and Super C variants) from 77-85. A couple of considerations from my memories of flying them:

The ones I flew had a stability augmentation system (SAS). In essence it told the tandem-rotor helicopter (among other things) which end is which in forward flight. For emergency procedures training we practiced flying with the SAS off and it wasn’t easy to keep it in a nice trim in forward flight. Flying sideways the SAS would have to be disabled, otherwise the pilot would be fighting the helicopter and the SAS trying to do its job. Also, all of the air intakes for the engines and the massive oil coolers are oriented forward. I wonder how anything would get an effective airflow, especially the downwind engine blanked by the pylon. Last and most obvious is the parasitic drag of a complete broadside of the fuselage. I couldn’t imagine the amount of torque required to pull it sideways at the airspeed you claim and not experience retreating blade stall and/or exceed the blade flapping limits.

And, by the way, it’s WOC, not WAC. So, in a nutshell, those are my breakfast flakes.
 

TFF

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Unlike a regular helicopter, a CH47 has 2 lifting rotors into thrust. Until you hit the collective limit which I believe biases to the rear, one could fly dam fast sideways. It would look like a V-22 from a distance. I don’t think it would be much fun for the pilots just because they are not really seated for that, but it should go. There is a famous picture of one pulling an ice sled and it’s almost vertical longitudinally, just do that going sideways.
 

Rik-

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San Rafael, California
Unlike a regular helicopter, a CH47 has 2 lifting rotors into thrust. Until you hit the collective limit which I believe biases to the rear, one could fly dam fast sideways. It would look like a V-22 from a distance. I don’t think it would be much fun for the pilots just because they are not really seated for that, but it should go. There is a famous picture of one pulling an ice sled and it’s almost vertical longitudinally, just do that going sideways.

Vertol 107 from Columbia Helicopters towing a generator over the ice
 

D Hillberg

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Well, I was there in a way. As a graduate of Mother Rucker I had the privilege to fly OH58s, UH-1s, (D, H and N variants) and CH47s (B,C and Super C variants) from 77-85. A couple of considerations from my memories of flying them:

The ones I flew had a stability augmentation system (SAS). In essence it told the tandem-rotor helicopter (among other things) which end is which in forward flight. For emergency procedures training we practiced flying with the SAS off and it wasn’t easy to keep it in a nice trim in forward flight. Flying sideways the SAS would have to be disabled, otherwise the pilot would be fighting the helicopter and the SAS trying to do its job. Also, all of the air intakes for the engines and the massive oil coolers are oriented forward. I wonder how anything would get an effective airflow, especially the downwind engine blanked by the pylon. Last and most obvious is the parasitic drag of a complete broadside of the fuselage. I couldn’t imagine the amount of torque required to pull it sideways at the airspeed you claim and not experience retreating blade stall and/or exceed the blade flapping limits.

And, by the way, it’s WOC, not WAC. So, in a nutshell, those are my breakfast flakes.
Don't know how that 'A' got there - Loved that museum in Rucker & that test flight facility
Even the H 21 had issues in flying nose first. Had a guy named Hawk who wanted to fly nonstop around the world with that banana [Room to sleep eat & poop and a giant gas tank]
air to air refueling by dropping a hose to a fixed winger below...
I guess the overhaul limits would of been exceeded pulling off that last flight
 

D Hillberg

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See the source image

Chinooks baby brother BV 107 II
 

Vigilant1

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It's an awesome sight to see a string of CH-47 zooming down the range road to Sicily DZ. Yeah, they go fast, but in that crazy crab yaw/tilt the whole time. Imagine how fast they'd be if they could fly straight!,😀
The USAF never had much love for "em, spent a lot more dough for the -53s. I'm sure the -53s are wonderful machines, but they seemed to be broken a lot more than the -47s.
I spoke with a very experienced W5 who had been assigned to fly -47s back to Army units after they came off the production line and/or major depot maintenance. He said the birds flew much different from line aircraft, much smoother. There was nothing inherently buzzy about the -47, they can be tuned and balanced to be smooth as glass. He said it's just more trouble than the Army wanted to go through on a regular basis.
They really get the job done.
I also enjoyed watching 3 CH-46s doing the slingload "VERTREP" dance off Thumrait, bringing ammo aboard ships. It's pretty impressive, orderly and efficient. I do wonder about the "plan" for the guys underneath hooking up/retrieving those loads if the chopper MUST land while they are under there. Sometimes hope IS the plan...
 
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