Crashes in the News - Thread

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TFF

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Watching a video of a friend skydiving; off to the corner you see the KingAir do a Split S and dive past the divers. Saw the same pilot roll a Lear 45 on takeoff about 10pm one winter.
 

Vigilant1

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scramjetter

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I pulled the flight up on adsbexchange.com and it shows the Cessna 340 doing ~180 knots over the threshold of runway 20 at less than 400 feet. There is probably an altitude correction that has to be applied to that, but that's not exactly a stabilized approach.

That's a shame.
A high wing airplane and a low wing airplane collide on approach to landing. I have a hunch ....
 

Hawk81A

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Saw a picture of a Cessna 195 that made an emergency landing on a highway and hit a car. Beautiful plane. Looks like at least one wing folded up and maybe lost the engine. Pilot's okay
 

wktaylor

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TFF #5661 Are You talking about the King Air C90 that spun while getting ready to drop skydivers? That was South Africa...

OR were You referring to a 'routine skydiver-drop' and aircraft return by a bored/in-a-hurry pilot? In that case, the pilot usually clears/stays clear of the drop-zone as they descend to landing. Any 'off-script drop-plane return-to-landing maneuver' could endanger the divers.
 

Bill-Higdon

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jedi

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This brings back sad memories. My brother and friend in 172 Cessna were landing and 320 Cessna settle on top and you know the picture, Controlled airport - no survivors,
I would like to know more details on that incident.

One of my Airplane Instrument CFIs told me about his flight with a PPL student on what was to be the final flight before the flight exam.

They were on final for a short field landing in a Champ when their prop got tangled and lodged in the bottom of a tripacer.

Back to the Watsonville crash- i do not know how they got it but one of the news reports had audio of the conversation between the two pilots.

The twin made a position report. 150 on base made visual contact with twin and commented on closure rate followed by “going around”.
 
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WBNH

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Yeah, that audio was in Blancolirio's vid as well, and others on the tube. 152 simply got run over. Had right of way, in a closed pattern, and still got nailed. Even tried to fly defensively and go around when he saw closure was too fast.

Sympathies to all involved. As usual, it was tragically avoidable.
 
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Vigilant1

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152 simply got run over. Had right of way, in a closed pattern, and still got nailed. Even tried to fly defensively and go around when he saw closure was too fast.
Agreed. The 152 pilot seemed to have good awareness, but couldn't reasonably have known that the C-340 would be doing his straight in final at approx 160+ knots (!?). If he had known that, he could have extended his downwind to avoid the conflict, but it should never have been an issue.
IMO, from the info available now, the pilot of the C-340 bears primary responsibility for this midair.
 

Riggerrob

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Agreed. The 152 pilot seemed to have good awareness, but couldn't reasonably have known that the C-340 would be doing his straight in final at approx 160+ knots (!?). If he had known that, he could have extended his downwind to avoid the conflict, but it should never have been an issue.
IMO, from the info available now, the pilot of the C-340 bears primary responsibility for this midair.
That reminds me of the time when I was a solo student practicing touch-and-goes in a Cessna 150. The runway was 5,000 feet long, so I had climbed to almost 1,000 feet by the time I reached mid-field. Meanwhile I had been listening on the radio to a light twin that was entering the pattern. I eventually lifted a wing to see him just a few hundred feet above me. I could barely see his windshield, but I doubt if he ever saw me. I pushed my nose down to stay below him, but I doubt if he ever saw me.
 

addaon

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For someone who has experience in aircraft with performance like the Cessna 340...

How feasible was the 340's high-speed approach in this situation? Was this a pilot hotdogging and having fun (sounds like he was familiar with the area), or was this already set up for something to go wrong? Sounds like he was at 190+ kts at 10 miles, and slowed down to 180+ kts at 3 miles... can that aircraft really bleed 20 kts that quickly (without maneuvering) to get to flap speed, and can it really bleed another 20 kts to get to gear speed? I assume once the flaps and gear are down going from 140 kts to 90 kts (?) over the numbers is doable in a mile (although that seems aggressive to me), but could he really get from 180 kts to 140 kts in two?
 
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Jedi wanted a few more details, It was not incident it was a fatal accident. My brother and friend in 172 downwind (communicating with tower) pilot in 320 just purchased shooting landings was informed by tower to reduce speed as he was closing on aircraft shooting landings, 320 pilot replied to tower he was going around, tower informed him there was a 172 downwind and the next thing he made a midfield turn out and cut across tail of 172. End of story,
 

Rik-

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Everyone is stuck on the ADSB speed data and I just wonder how accurate it is 100% of the time as the 340 was above flap, gear, approach and every other V speed at the #'s according the ADSB data.

Simply observing, and flying at a uncontrolled AP, I hear the bigger planes call "5 mile straight in for X" all the time and this just seems to simple to ignore that the bigger guy who was on a VFR route was used to getting his way and it bit himself and another plane in the ass.
 

Vigilant1

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Simply observing, and flying at a uncontrolled AP, I hear the bigger planes call "5 mile straight in for X" all the time and this just seems to simple to ignore that the bigger guy who was on a VFR route was used to getting his way and it bit himself and another plane in the ass.
Both pilots made appropriate radio calls, but the C-340 pilot apparently didn't comprehend/appreciate what he was hearing. I.E. "There's a small plane in front of me and I don't see it."
I'm all for keeping comms brief and keeping the frequency open, but it doesn't cost a nickel to say "Watsonville, Cessna 340 on final. I don't have the 152 in sight, I am breaking off my approach, will climb to 1200 feet on runway heading." Or something similar (and briefer, better).

There are at least two grieving families wishing that these two guys had communicated better (among other things). In the final analysis, it hardly matters who was "in the right."
 
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