Crashes in the News - Thread

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Riggerrob

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I've done some city/county engineer and am currently on an airport board. Small town politics is horrible. It ends up kicking the can down the road because they don't want to fight land owner rights to do whatever they want, especially in Idaho.

We're trying to make some ordinance changes just to remind the city to comply with Part 77 and understand the ramifications of their decisions. Land owners and developers got all their panties in a bunch.

This reminds me of a recent conversation with the owner/operator of a skydiving drop zone in Western Canada. In previous years, he had hosted several Skyvan boogies per year, but none were mentioned on this year's version of his website, so I phoned him. He explained a problem with contamination of jet fuel stored at the small, municipal airport that he takes off from. The storage tank has a few inches of black sludge in the bottom. All the local helicopter companies fly elsewhere to re-fuel. The DZO explained that the municipal council lacks the knowledge and expertise to manage their municipal airport. Only one council member holds a student pilot permit! The fuel tank contamination problem keeps getting kicked down the road because no one on the council knows how to solve it.
 

wktaylor

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The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute (ASI) has released a new video from its Early Analysis series providing an initial examination of a tragic accident that took the life of a pilot competing in a STOL contest.

On May 20, 2022, a Cessna 140 crashed at the MayDay STOL (Short Takeoff and Landing) event in Wayne, Nebraska. While no injuries on the ground were reported, the pilot, Tom Dafoe, the only occupant in the aircraft, died.

The winds were too strong to hold the event, which would have been a STOL Drag competition, a test of speed and precision measured by time and combined takeoff and landing distance.
... ...

 

bmcj

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The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute (ASI) has released a new video from its Early Analysis series providing an initial examination of a tragic accident that took the life of a pilot competing in a STOL contest.
One other factor to consider is that if there was any significant crosswind, was there any wind shadow (wake from ground based objects) or wind gradient present. In a strong wind gradient, his turn to the right might have put the higher left wing in a stronger flow which could increase the rolling moment beyond his expectations. On the other hand, a wind shadow can create havoc on airflow which might stall a wing flying at max CL.
 

TFF

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Organizers need to be upping some of the safety before things like this happens more. Aerobatic style shoulder harnesses, flame retardant flying suits and helmets, fire extinguisher. Yes it will have haters but insurance will make it happen anyway. Might as well look like you want to be on top of it.
 

BJC

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Pilot flew beyond its published minimum limits - Everything else is mute
Yup, but everything else is not mute. The obvious follow-up question is why he did that.

One possibility is that he was so focused on the competition landing that he failed to recognize that he was flying into a dangerous situation. He was low, but lowering the nose and applying full power before attempting to turn - even though that would have taken him closer to the traffic ahead - might have allowed him to fly out of the problem. A left turn, into the crosswind component, would have had a higher probability of success, but likely would have created conflict with downwind traffic.

It is easy to second guess, especially sitting here safely on the porch, and that is not what I’m trying to do. I am trying to offer a few thoughts about the benefits of thinking things through in advance, and having a plan of action for potential adverse scenarios. And having practiced whatever the plan of action is. As I have often posted, maneuvering at low altitudes looks very different from the same maneuvers at a few hundred feet, so careful practice starting at altitude, then working lower, is prudent.

Now join me at Oshkosh, and watch some of the arriving aircraft wallow above the runway when the controller says “Keep it in the air, fly to the XXX dot.” Scary, and obviously unpracticed.

Learning from other peoples’ mistakes is safer and quicker than trying to make them all yourself.


BJC
 
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Victor Bravo

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Pilot flew beyond its published minimum limits - Everything else is mute

No, not mute, and not even moot.

The pilot was participating in an organized competition, where aircraft limits are routinely pushed and exceeded. Known higher risk, known lower safety margins, known reductions in "safety factor". Although all pilots in all competitions are still of course responsible for the operation of their aircraft, the whole purpose of a competition is to push limits, set new records, and demonstrate what is possible.

What does "published" textbook limits have to do with any competition?
 

D Hillberg

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No, not mute, and not even moot.

The pilot was participating in an organized competition, where aircraft limits are routinely pushed and exceeded. Known higher risk, known lower safety margins, known reductions in "safety factor". Although all pilots in all competitions are still of course responsible for the operation of their aircraft, the whole purpose of a competition is to push limits, set new records, and demonstrate what is possible.

What does "published" textbook limits have to do with any competition?
It does not matter what the mission is, Rescue, Cargo, Transportation, Survey or Screwing around.
The limits are cast in stone and sooner or later that stone will dash you to pieces.

Minimum Maneuvering Speed...Behind Slower traffic - Got too slow - died.

Same style of accident all across the flying spectrum - Too slow - Stalled - crashed . Period end of story.
 

dave wolfe

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Is that event they were doing somewhat normal at these contests, where they have multiple aircraft doing patterns at the same time?
 

BBerson

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Victor Bravo

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The limits are cast in stone and sooner or later that stone will dash you to pieces.

You originally referred to published limits as being absolute. Now you're referring to limits being cast in stone.

So, if I am reading you correctly, you're telling me there is NO "Factor of Safety" or any separation between the published limits and what the aircraft will survive. An airplane certified to 3.8G at gross weight, and published as a Standard Category airplane, will break at 3.9G.An airplane published to a Vne speed of 165 miles an hour (the Cessna 150 IIRC) will flutter and be destroyed at 166 miles an hour.

NOTHING is cast in stone in an airplane. An airplane built in 1946 published at 3.8G Standard Category was probably tested to 6 or 7G in flight testing. That same airplane today, after 75 years of low-class pencil-whip annuals or spotty maintenance, a little rust, and one too many ham-fisted egomaniac pilots may fall apart at 3.0G.

Of course every airplane has SOME limit, but that limit changes over time, or becaue of a million factors on that prticular day. "Too slow"? At what temperature, density altitude, how many smashed bugs on the leading edge, how well is it rigged, did the guy tape up all the air gaps in the wing, is the guy an average pilot or a brand new student or is it Tony LeVier?

Go read the short story by Richard Bach called "Steel, Aluminum, Nuts and Bolts" for the actual reality :)
 

Bille Floyd

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For me , any crash is bad ; my fake legs hurt, just
thinking about it !! :(

Bille
 
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