Crashes in the News - Thread

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scramjetter

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I saw the accident aircraft had a very early serial number. The original 337s had a hydraulic pump on the front engine to raise the gear. Cessna later went with electrically operated gear. Transitioning to that hand operated pump would be tricky on takeoff!

EARLY ramp rumor is mechanical problems, they couldn't get the gear up and the airplane wouldn't climb above 1200 AGL leaving the pattern. No idea about the gear issue, but failure to climb could be the classic "rear engine failure on the Skymaster" scenario.
 

Turd Ferguson

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I wonder if he had the controls turned into the wind like one is supposed to.
Few yrs ago a Cessna Caravan at ORD was flipped up on it's nose and wingtip as it was leaving the ramp in gusty wind conditions from a passing t-storm. There were several passengers on board. It balanced there for several seconds then fell back on the landing gear barely missing going all the way over.
That is how most of Cessnas are flipped, rear quartering wind once it gets underneath and gets a main tire off the ground it will go over relatively easy.
 

Pops

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Dallas and I just finish putting together his 1966 C-150 with a zero time engine, new paint, interior, new everything. Best one I have seen. We pulled my Falconar F-12 out of the hanger and then pulled his C-150 out to start the engine for the first time. We stepped back in the hanger, heard a loud roar as a dust devil went over the hanger and turned my F-12 180 degs and up on one wheel. The C-150 also got turned 180 degs and up on one wheel where the wing tip almost hit the ground and then fell back upright.
 

PMD

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Hephaestus

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M20K (231) at Calgary, Springbank yesterday: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/fatal-plane-crash-springbank-west-calgary-1.6428441
Suspiciously like a joyride from low time pilot/owner stalling and spinning in onto final. Can't make out the registration but the colour scheme matches one based out of Kamloops BC (that has a new pilot/owner transitioning from bug smashers).
Pretty sure wx will be a factor too. I jumped on a westjet flight at 1pm; it was hard ifr/snow.
 

Victor Bravo

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Remember the recent video of the 172 being smashed by a commuter train at my home airport, three seconds after the cops pulled the guy out?

I met the pilot, Mark, today. He came by to see our Zenith airplane building program for the kids. Former USAF F-5 pilot, appears mid 70's age. Still recovering from the injuries of that wreck, but walking and driving.
 

PMD

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Pretty sure wx will be a factor too. I jumped on a westjet flight at 1pm; it was hard ifr/snow.
This morning talking heads on boob tube said it crashed on takeoff, but flight following site shows it returning after an hour or so - so possibly going around and departure stall? Sad to lose the pilot and passenger still in ICU.
 

wktaylor

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FYI. An aviation safety related editorial/article was in today's 'GAN' [General Aviation Newsletter]. This editorial/article highlights human factors in aviation. The editorial/article [see link] describes a situation between a controller and a CFI with a student... that went from routine to tense to explosive to dangerous in a matter of a few short minutes.

A correlation worth noting
https://generalaviationnews.com/2022/04/26/a-correlation-worth-noting/
By Jamie Beckett · April 26, 2022

Most of what I write in this space appears to be about aviation. In truth, it’s not.

Sure, it’s about aviation, but it’s not specifically about aviation. There is a correlation between what I write here and the wider world. The concepts expressed here often connect and reflect our aeronautical endeavors to other facets of our lives.

We who participate in aeronautical pursuits do not exist in a vacuum.

When I opine on the topics of customer service, personal responsibility, economic potential, political activism, or aeronautical decision making, those topics relate to us as people. People who concern themselves with all the various interests, hobbies, concerns, and challenges any Jane or Joe Public deals with, whether they’ve got a connection to aviation or not.

I write about people and possibilities. Aircraft, airports, and events are merely the vehicles I choose as a means of telling those stories.

This past week an inexcusably argumentative exchange between a controller and a pilot, a Certificated Flight Instructor, made its way onto social media. Aside from the entertainment value some may find in this exchange, it gives aviation a black eye by linking us to the worst characteristics of humans. Arrogance, resistance to authority, complacency, deflection of blame, refusal to accept responsibility, and as if that isn’t bad enough, this all took place during an instructional flight with what we can reasonably assume was a primary student.

… …

[continue to article if interested]

NOTE1. I learned early in my aero enginerd career that human factors... dealing with people in 'our' spectrum of education, experiences and our day-to-day emotional states... would be far harder than any technical problem I ever faced. Engineering is easy compared to people.

NOTE2. A USAF CMSgt gave me one 'clue card' for day-to-day use that I have found invaluable... but takes practice and sincerity: memorable, good-natured humor helps reset emotions to a lower level for more effective 1-to-1 communication. By softening negative emotions, SPEAKING and LISTENING has a chance in both directions. In the case described in the GAN article... 2-way communication utterly failed during the escalation of emotions between 2-supposed-aviation-professionals.
 

proppastie

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I am reminded of the phrase "if you want to attract A**H***S hang up a windsock"......
 
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