Crashes in the News - Thread

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Vigilant1

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I wouldn't but those are entirely different circumstances, just as the Saudi incident was. No smoke or flames in the cabin in this incident, and no other evident immediate danger to the passengers. Had this incident really been an actual fire, what the passenger did would most likely have made the situation more dangerous.
So, we are all in agreement:
1) There are situations in which a passenger >should< open the emergency exit on their own, without crewmember instructions.
2) This should only be done when absolutely required and when it is safe to do so. In this case, the passenger was wrong to believe the conditions had been met.
What caused the error? Lack of training? Lack of good judgement? Lack of the experience required to execute good judgement? I don't know. But it sounds like the passenger believed he was acting properly. I suspect a lot of attention will be paid to the steps taken by the crew to set conditions that help reduce the chances of this sort of thing (provide information and direction to passengers promptly, monitor door status immediately and continually in the case of a rapid stop or other unusual occurances, have the FAs get to a position to monitor the exit rows as soon as it is safe etc).
 
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Rhino

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There's certainly an opportunity to develop better briefings for passengers in those seats. There's no way to sufficiently train them, but certainly some limiting parameters could be passed on. Immediate dire danger, inability for crewmembers to communicate if evacuation is needed, hair is on fire, etc., etc.
 

Riggerrob

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I always try to get the emergency exit seat, and have been asked many times if I were willing to ...

Once, the flight attendant asked if I felt qualified, and I answered, “Yes.” She asked, “Why?” I replied that it was probable that I was the only one on board who had actually been in an airplane crash, and that I would take care of the emergency exit. Got a really funny look for that.


BJC
Remind me to use that line next time.
I have survived a King Air crash, but cannot recommend it as a pass-time.
Cabin crew were un-moved by my explanation that I was a skydiving instructor and had "assisted" thousands of students out of airplane doors.
 

Pilot-34

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I have been through 4 “ crashes” but never really felt the need to evacuate the aircraft after it came to a stop.
In fact in half of them I didn’t know about the crash status till after the emeywas over.
But as I sit here about to board yet another airliner I must reflect how bad exit row operational training is.
The only training is the seat back card and that seems to insinuate when to open the door is up to the occupants
There should be exit row simulators in the waiting areas of airports.
Some airlines charge for exit row seating frequently resulting in NoOne in the exit row.
How is that going to work out in a emergency?
 

Pops

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I have been through 4 “ crashes” but never really felt the need to evacuate the aircraft after it came to a stop.
In fact in half of them I didn’t know about the crash status till after the emeywas over.
But as I sit here about to board yet another airliner I must reflect how bad exit row operational training is.
The only training is the seat back card and that seems to insinuate when to open the door is up to the occupants
There should be exit row simulators in the waiting areas of airports.
Some airlines charge for exit row seating frequently resulting in NoOne in the exit row.
How is that going to work out in a emergency?

2--- One mid-air at night, one when I was in the right seat of a C-182 and about 75' after a nice touchdown the nose gear retracted. ( not a RG). Quick stop and didn't go over on its back. Grandson in the back seat. Only injury was the pilot broke his fingernail on his little finger. :) 11 hrs after a new engine and prop and paint.
 

Turd Ferguson

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Some airlines charge for exit row seating frequently resulting in NoOne in the exit row.
How is that going to work out in a emergency?
It worked out good for me when I use to deadhead or non-rev as I could easily score an exit row seat when a premium cabin seat was not available. The cabin crew was happy to have a trained crewmember in the exit row. I share their frustration as it's a crapshoot as to whether or not an ABP in the exit row will properly respond. In the event a cabin crewmember is not able to give commands, I think a lot of the pax will just sit there.
 

Turd Ferguson

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Anybody remember reading about this Saudi airliner in 1980 where every person aboard died due to a delayed evacuation?
Yeah, it's believed everyone in the cabin was dead or incapacitated from smoke well before the plane touched down so it would have been hard for anyone on the plane to initiate evac.
 

Rhino

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2--- One mid-air at night, one when I was in the right seat of a C-182 and about 75' after a nice touchdown the nose gear retracted. ( not a RG). Quick stop and didn't go over on its back. Grandson in the back seat. Only injury was the pilot broke his fingernail on his little finger. :) 11 hrs after a new engine and prop and paint.
Tragedy. Them broken fingernails take forever to heal! :p
 

bmcj

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That video is from a few years ago. I recognized the airport as soon as I saw the clip. It is an airport road that crosses the approach end of the runway; there are signs on that road that clearly say to watch for and yield to landing aircraft. There are also STOPS painted on the road on each side of runway. The approach path is clearly visible from the road, so there is no excuse for not looking and seeing.
 
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Bill-Higdon

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That video is from a few years ago. I recognized the airport as soon as I saw the clip. It is an airport road that crosses the approach end of the runway; there are signs on that road that clearly say to watch for and yield to landing aircraft. There are also STOPS painted on the road on each side of runway. The approach path is clearly visible from the road, so there is no excuse for not looking and seeing.

Back in the 70's or 80's a Learjet crashed into a semi at U78 Allen Tigert airport by Soda Springs Idaho the semi ran a stop sign that was supposed to prevent airplanes hitting motor vehicles. I wound up sitting next to the Learjet field rep who was going to do an"accident survey" for the insurance company. I got a job offer from that meeting but I was "on the road" too much at that point with the job I had at that time & time I was away would hve been way over my limits.
 

Pilot-34

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Back in the 70's or 80's a Learjet crashed into a semi at U78 Allen Tigert airport by Soda Springs Idaho the semi ran a stop sign that was supposed to prevent airplanes hitting motor vehicles.
That and the video both explain why you should always stop for a stop sign even though you don’t see any cars…….
 

Pops

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At our airport we used to have a farm type of above ground fuel tank for use of the airplanes on our private airport only. The fuel tanker truck filled the tank up and instead of going back the road he came on, he left the road and started to drive directly across the runway to another road on the other side of the runway.
I ran and stopped him right at the edge of the runway. I said some words that I shouldn't have used and used some that I should have used.
 
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Pops

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At our airport we used to have a farm type of above ground fuel tank for use of the airplanes on our private airport only. The fuel tanker truck filled the tank up and instead of going back the road he can on, he left the road and started to drive directly across the runway to another road on the other side of the runway.
I ran and stopped him right at the edge of the runway. I said some words that I shouldn't have used and used some that I should have used.
If the why was for me. I guess he didn't want to turn the truck around when he thought he could just drive straight ahead and get on the road on the other side of the runway.
 
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