Crashes in the News - Thread

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Marc W

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One of our EAA members went down Saturday. The pilot has an airstrip at his home and he flew to the EAA meeting at Delta airport. The airplane has a ULpower 350 and it wouldn't start after the meeting. He suspected vapor lock so the airplane was put into a hanger to get it out of the heat and sun. The engine is fuel injected but it has a lot of fuel line in the engine compartment. The engine started normally after sitting in the hanger a while. The engine quit on his way home. I heard he stalled it 10' or 15' high and the left wing tip hit first, then the nose and it flipped over. He was not seriously hurt except for aggravating a previous back injury which may now require surgery to repair.

Pilot hospitalized after crash landing small plane

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Victor Bravo

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Please wish your friend a speedy recovery, and encourage your chapter to all come together around rebuilding the airplane and getting him back in the air immediately.
 

Turd Ferguson

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Just lost a neighbor. Beech Mouse N8780M. CFI made it, student did not. Strange crash, into a large field. Farm road type setup, landed my old Mouse on similar, looks more like a stall/crash the way the plane is folded up. No shoulder harnesses in airplane.

Derswede
Hey Derswede, sorry to hear about this. Please post any update you hear about the crash.

I know some back history on that plane, it was fished out of a hangar in Port Huron, MI after sitting idle for roughly 10 yrs, returned to flying condition and passed off to a broker in Indy who had it listed for sale for a long time. Has the Continental IO-346 engine.
 

bmcj

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Just lost a neighbor. Beech Mouse N8780M. CFI made it, student did not. Strange crash, into a large field. Farm road type setup, landed my old Mouse on similar, looks more like a stall/crash the way the plane is folded up. No shoulder harnesses in airplane.

Derswede
Sorry for the loss.
 

proppastie

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The failure rate of electric motors may be lower than ICE, but I'd be willing to bet the restart rate isn't. Why don't we leave that stuff to the electric propulsion thread.
We are/were talking about crashes/out landings of motor gliders because of failures to re-start ICE engines. Are you saying ICE aircraft engines are easier to start/re-start (maybe when hot) than electric?
 

Marc W

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Sorry to hear that but glad he made it. The photo must be deceiving because it looks like a great field choice for a forced landing.
Yes, it looks like an alfalfa field. It seems like the perfect field for a forced landing. However I don't know if there were powerlines or other obstacles he had to clear. I will hear more later.
 

bmcj

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Yes, it looks like an alfalfa field. It seems like the perfect field for a forced landing. However I don't know if there were powerlines or other obstacles he had to clear. I will hear more later.
I agree. When I mentioned that the looks are deceiving, I was hinting at possible obstructions out of the field of view.

I was practicing a forced landing in a Cessna G-1000 172 one time. I had a great field picked out and set up my pattern to be a little high side. I rely heavily on my rudder and sideslip to bleed off altitude when needed, but when I dropped a wing and pushed the opposite rudder, it barely cocked the nose. I applied full rudder and discovered that the G-1000 didn’t have enough rudder to do a meaningful slip. Had it been a real dead stick, I would have far overshot my landing zone.

I’m not at all implying that happened here. I’m sure the Zenith has plenty of rudder, and I’m pretty sure that was a Zenith in your photo.
 
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Rhino

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We are/were talking about crashes/out landings of motor gliders because of failures to re-start ICE engines. Are you saying ICE aircraft engines are easier to start/re-start (maybe when hot) than electric?
No. Electric motors are generally more reliable than ICE, but stops in electric motors tend to be more catastrophic and irrecoverable, whereas stops in ICE can be due to a myriad of reasons that often give a higher probability of a restart. But again, that isn't a topic of this thread.
 

Derswede

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Turd, it was bought by a company here in NC apparently, and they had an engine out situation. No detail on the cause of the crash, I am familiar with that area and with the Mouse (aka Flying Brick). We had a similar plane, the old trainer from the Beech dealer here in NC, N5760V. That was my solo bird. My instructor was a crusty old guy who always thought that we student pilots were out to kill him. One thing he would do is pull the throttle back and say, "Engine out, no chance of restart, what are you going to do?" To this day, as I am driving, I look at fields and think, I could land there, or,no chance, trees, ruts, wires, etc." Did actually land it on a farm road I knew well, about gave the instructor a heart attack. Farm road was wider than the strip we flew out of, and I knew the owner.

Not going to disturb the family, they lost another relative in a car crash recently, so will wait for the NTSB and some of the local guys to speak up. It was apparently not a well-liked plane. There is a You-tube video which raises more questions than it answers. Looks almost like a stall/spin low altitude crash. Wings snapped off, small impact area, fuselage broken behind the cabin.
 

Marc W

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I agree. When I mentioned that the looks are deceiving, I was hinting at possible obstructions out of the field of view.
I heard the rest of the story today. Our other Zenith 750 flier has been handling the communication with the FAA and NTSB. According to him the pilot picked the wrong field; the one he picked was to close. That area is all agriculture and these fields are flood irrigated. The field was short to begin with, with a ditch at the near end, and he dove for the field. He was indicating about 90 mph at the beginning of the field and he tried to force it down. There is a low berm across the field and when he approached it he yanked the stick back to clear it. He over controlled and stalled the plane. If he had just eased the stick back to clear the berm, he probably would have been able to land OK.

The FAA and NTSB are not classifying it as a crash. They are classifying it as a bad landing following an engine failure. Neither the NTSB nor FAA actually came out(their offices are far away)(I like it that way). The conversation was all by phone.

The pilot is talking about hanging it up as far as aviation goes. We all hope he comes back but time will tell.
 

rollerball

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Marc W

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A young friend went down in the mountains near Leadville, Colorado yesterday due to engine failure. Leadville has the highest public airport in the USA at 9,934'. I don't know any details except there was at least one other person in the airplane and nobody was hurt. I am also happy to see it is not his airplane.

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proppastie

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i don't trust electric cars let alone electric planes. Sorry
given the alternative in many powered launch gliders is a 2 stroke engine you might think differently......also in one's powered glider when one wants to re start the engine because he ran out of lift ......well modern cars start very well....but one might not call most aircraft engines modern and certainly a flooded aircraft engine or fouled plug in a 2 stroke engine vs flip a switch to start the electric motor .....many are looking at electric for gliders.....but you are correct in that the technology is so new it is reasonable to not trust it.
 

Arkan

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given the alternative in many powered launch gliders is a 2 stroke engine you might think differently......also in one's powered glider when one wants to re start the engine because he ran out of lift ......well modern cars start very well....but one might not call most aircraft engines modern and certainly a flooded aircraft engine or fouled plug in a 2 stroke engine vs flip a switch to start the electric motor .....many are looking at electric for gliders.....but you are correct in that the technology is so new it is reasonable to not trust it.
I would think the weight of the batteries in a glider would be counter productive. You ever weigh a electric car battery?

tesla battery pack weighs 1200 pounds....
 
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