Crashes in the News - Thread

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bmcj

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I'll wager the only reason the engine stopped is because the pilot made it stop.

So, ixnay on the "disaster averted" heading.
100%. He went up with a rope tied to him and a cameraman(women?) in the back seat to film it. You know he planned it and kills the engine so that he could prop it from inside.

That being said, an air restart should be easy. For most planes, you have to hang it on a stall for awhile to get the engine to stop, and while it’s hard to turn the prop by diving, it only takes a very quick momentary bump on the starter to get it spinning during a normal glide.

MAYBE THE MODS SHOULD CLIP THIS CHAIN OF POSTS AND PUT THEM INTO A SEPARATE THREAD ABOUT PROPPING???
 

Riggerrob

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Barely flying again and... Another birdstrike.

Minor correction: the news story mentions a bird near the right engine. That should have read "bird near the right engine intake" because Canadair Tutor trainers only have a single J85 engine. That engine receives air via a pair of intakes. These intakes/inlets are located on both sides of the fuselage between the cockpit and wings.
Cessna built a similar trainer for the USAF, but the trainer was powered by a pair of Continental J69 engines. Those weak engines were so loud that it was almost painful to stand beside a Tweety Bird idling on the ground!
The similar Cessna A-37 ground attack airplane has a pair of J85 engines.
J85 engines were also installed in T-38 and CF-5, albeit the supersonic versions have after-burners.
 
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Vigilant1

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The similar Cessna T-37 trainer has a [air of J85 engines.
Minor correction: The T-37s had a pair of Continental J69 engines. 1025 lb max thrust and a very noisy centrifugal compressor. Sturdy, though.
The A-37 version had J85s. They had over twice as much thrust. The same engines, but with afterburners, were used on the supersonic T-38.
 
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Mad MAC

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That SA227 looks pretty close to the tail falling off, there isn't a lot of meat in those fuselages and you will note the slight sag in the tail.
 

Daleandee

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That SA227 looks pretty close to the tail falling off, there isn't a lot of meat in those fuselages and you will note the slight sag in the tail.
I'm amazed that it was still controllable. I have no idea where the linkages to the tail surfaces are but there's a lot of airplane missing back there!
 

bmcj

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The Cirrus is looking very Cirrus-y after that midair but get a load of the Metro that was involved!View attachment 110504
Here is what someone posted on Facebook:

Doing touch and go’s at Centennial this morning and heard this guy say he’d had a mid-air.
Definitely his lucky day. They said they saw a chute deploy, so might have been a Cirrus.
Hoping everyone is ok.

Update: After looking at the radar tracks, and listening to the tower tapes, it seems obvious to me what happened.
The Cirrus had a ground speed at one point of 189 mph on a right base to 17R, and simply overshot the final, flying through the right side of the Metro.
There were not any prior calls about any problems prior to the collision.
The controller had called out the traffic to the Cirrus.
I had been flying in the pattern when this happened and the winds were light and variable at altitude.
Rule Number One: DO NOT OVERSHOOT FINAL!!!!!
 

Voidhawk9

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Besides what appears to be the Cirrus flying through final and into the Metro, there was a lot of good airmanship displayed all around.

Controllers don't 'separate' between aircraft visually flying a final approach, nor would staring at their radar screens help in cases like this (and is not legal to do so in some countries). Aircraft are expected to fly as cleared and not run into other aircraft they have been advised of and have reported visual with.
 

Hephaestus

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Besides what appears to be the Cirrus flying through final and into the Metro, there was a lot of good airmanship displayed all around.

Controllers don't 'separate' between aircraft visually flying a final approach, nor would staring at their radar screens help in cases like this (and is not legal to do so in some countries). Aircraft are expected to fly as cleared and not run into other aircraft they have been advised of and have reported visual with.
Yeah, I don't think I've dealt with more than a dozen parallel runways - few times I have, seems like controllers were a little more on the ball - probably to prevent this particular scenario.

Fully vfr - yeah I can see it, the L vs R runway size/length I can see the easy mistake... And the metro's going to be a shoulder check behind and to the left of the pilot... Cirrus is a bit above and over the right side... So direct sight-lines were terrible on both. And both probably typical final more eyes in than out...

But reality - I mean I guess the cirrus might not have adsb - but most do... Metroliner would. Just makes me wonder why we ended up in this situation that seems avoidable.
 

TFF

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I have flown into an airport, where two planes from different parts of the country where the N numbers were so close that the pilots were getting confused on instructions. The planes were in different parts of the pattern, but the pilots kept asking “ do you mean me? That instruction does not make sense”. The common sense mode needs to be on all the time.
ADSB is a funny tool. I have a friend who has lifetimes more hours than most that watches the ADSB instead of looking out the window. Yes he does look out the window, but his gadgetness has him acting different than the last 50 years he has flown. I have been with him while another plane kept turning in on us to keep a better heading because he could see us on his adsb. We volunteered to the controller to drop down, because the other guy played stupid on purpose to stay on course.
 

mcrae0104

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I was just doing pattern work there a few days ago... busy place, Centennial.
 
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