Crashes in the News - Thread

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Yellowhammer

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Fuel dumping is kinda thing of the past. If you have to land you just land overweight and maintenance takes over after that. They may have to do an inspection on the plane. Scope and detail of the inspection depends on how the landing is recorded by the boxes.

Not in Naval Carrier Operations.
 

PB339

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oakland
What if, what if, what if. It didn't, that didn't, everyone survived. If it bothers you to fly, don't fly. Your chance of dying are greater driving to the airport. Kudos to the pilots for their professionalism and skill to contribute to a successful outcome. We all have a time to leave this earth, and you are not likely to leave earlier. Enjoy the life you have left.
 

Kiwi303

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Another question.
I've often read or heard the sometimes when a passenger jet has to make a landing short of the destination, they have to dump fuel because they can not land when weighed down with all that unused fuel. I did not hear that this flight dumped fuel. So why was it OK to land with a heavy fuel load?

Richard
Denver to Hawaii in a plane that can manage Denver to Singapore...

They never carry more fuel than needed for the flight plus reserves, the more they carry the heavier the plane and the more they need to burn to carry the extra and so on.

So a 3000ish mile flight on a 7000ish mile range aircraft means less than a max fuel load so landing weight was lower than mandatory emergency fuel dump values.
 
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HeavyIr0ndad

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Nov 22, 2019
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Fuel dumping is kinda thing of the past. If you have to land you just land overweight and maintenance takes over after that. They may have to do an inspection on the plane. Scope and detail of the inspection depends on how the landing is recorded by the boxes.
I kinda disagree; I dumped fuel several times in the last 4-5 years of my career with a major US carrier (B-767ER & B-777). Not for major emergencies, just well-defined maintenance problems or passenger/compliance issues.
The Company decided the cost of the gas and a short delay to refuel was better than an overweight landing (possible damage- these planes are about 30 years old), an inspection, and possibly replacing the crew, which has little margin before exceeding crew duty day at landing, say 12 hours later.
I’ve dumped a lot of dinosaurs into the oceans, 100,000 lbs at a time!
 

Andy Hughes

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I could never understand the logic of flying with a wing that can collapse on a whim of the wind or weather let alone on the merest hint of airborne abuse or mismanagement by the pilot. Even the most experienced in our midst make mistakes but if the wing is rigid at least you have a chance of recovering, especially at low level. Not so if you're a paraglider as we see time after time on Youtube.
You have no idea what you are talking about "collapse on a whim of the wind"? Na, your funny just another Youtube watcher. Youtube is mostly about sensationalism failures.
 

Andy Hughes

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With the small video camera mounted on the gyro, it has to be fairly recent, from the GoPro era.



No, just unsafe pilots or flying in unsafe conditions.



A modern paraglider flown in reasonable conditions won't collapse at the "merest hint of airborne abuse or mismanagement." If you fly on a rowdy day you might get a minor collapse, but 99.9% of the time it reinflates instantly, you might not even realize it's happening until it's over. It's happened to me probably a half dozen times over maybe 300 hours of powered paragliding. But those aren't the videos that make it onto youtube.

A paraglider collapse at 500' is a lot more likely to be survivable (and even a non event!) than a stall/spin in an airplane from the same altitude.

From numbers I looked at some years ago when I was into it, I concluded that while a paraglider pilot is more likely to, say, break an ankle than an airline pilot, their chance of dying is about the same.


Paraglider pilots often carry a hand thrown reserve parachute. Parasailers, aka "dope on a rope", are the people who get dragged aloft in a parachute by a boat after one too many beers in Cancun.
Great reply to all of the ill informed Youtube watchers. I fly PPG also a minor collape is a non event, maybe loose 20' altitude. Wings designed for different skill levels.
View attachment 108017

Types of Paraglider Wings – What is an EN Rating?
  • You're a beginner – EN Rating A.
  • You're an occasional flyer – EN Rating A.
  • You're looking for your first upgrade – EN Rating B.
  • You're looking for greater control and manoeuvrability over various conditions – XC Wing (EN Rating B or C)
 

Andy Hughes

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Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
38
With the small video camera mounted on the gyro, it has to be fairly recent, from the GoPro era.



No, just unsafe pilots or flying in unsafe conditions.



A modern paraglider flown in reasonable conditions won't collapse at the "merest hint of airborne abuse or mismanagement." If you fly on a rowdy day you might get a minor collapse, but 99.9% of the time it reinflates instantly, you might not even realize it's happening until it's over. It's happened to me probably a half dozen times over maybe 300 hours of powered paragliding. But those aren't the videos that make it onto youtube.

A paraglider collapse at 500' is a lot more likely to be survivable (and even a non event!) than a stall/spin in an airplane from the same altitude.

From numbers I looked at some years ago when I was into it, I concluded that while a paraglider pilot is more likely to, say, break an ankle than an airline pilot, their chance of dying is about the same.


Paraglider pilots often carry a hand thrown reserve parachute. Parasailers, aka "dope on a rope", are the people who get dragged aloft in a parachute by a boat after one too many beers in Cancun.
Great reply to all of the ill informed Youtube watchers. I fly PPG also a minor collapse is a non event, maybe loose 20' altitude. Wings designed for different skill levels.
Image result for paraglider wing ratings
Types of Paraglider Wings – What is an EN Rating?
  • You're a beginner – EN Rating A.
  • You're an occasional flyer – EN Rating A.
  • You're looking for your first upgrade – EN Rating B.
  • You're looking for greater control and manoeuvrability over various conditions – XC Wing (EN Rating B or C)
 

Speedboat100

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rollerball

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I don't belive in that mantra anymore...we need lighter and more efficient aeroplanes...much more efficient.
hmmm... very light aircraft sound like a good idea... until you want to fly them in anything but still weather conditions. Ask Peter Sripol. And anyway, a light electric aircraft is an oxymoron. There's no such thing and likely never will be. Not one that's usable with a decent range anyway.
 

Speedboat100

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hmmm... very light aircraft sound like a good idea... until you want to fly them in anything but still weather conditions. Ask Peter Sripol. And anyway, a light electric aircraft is an oxymoron. There's no such thing and likely never will be. Not one that's usable with a decent range anyway.

It is a challenge, but I think there is a way.
 

radfordc

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Feb 5, 2008
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hmmm... very light aircraft sound like a good idea... until you want to fly them in anything but still weather conditions.
I've flown a Quicksilver MX (the one with no ailerons) in 20+ mph winds. No real issue flying (as long as you don't need to go upwind). Landings are a little tense.
 
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