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Crashes in the News - Thread

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David Lewis

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Clearing the plugs on runup is common. But I don't see the point in landing to do a runup on the ground. Does that involve leaning or something?
They might have been referring to blowing nitrogen into the magnetos to remove condensate -- a procedure that can only be conducted on the ground.
 

Riggerrob

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just announced that January 9 will be the National Day to remember Victims of Air Disasters.

Do I count after surviving a King Air crash back in 2008?
Hah!
Hah!
When are they going to remove the wreck from the middle of Pitt Meadows Airport?
Hah!
Hah!
Correction: 8 January is the Canadian National Day to Remember Victims of Air Disasters.
 

David Lewis

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think that is explained in one of these videos: Collings B-17 Mishap
Thank you for that. Sounds like the passengers did not get a safety briefing, did not put on seatbelts correctly, nobody investigated engines that wouldn't start, the pilot didn't do a run up, took off from an intersection, lowered the gear before it was clear they would make the runway, and ignored a closer alternate runway.

The big mistake in my view was flying the pattern nose-high. Correct me if I'm giving bad advice here -- but if I'm too low to make the runway, I release some back pressure on the stick and get the nose down.

From what little I've casually observed at flying warbird museums, maintenance standards can be pretty low, and FAA supervision spotty.
 

wktaylor

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Scary/bizarre incident...

Avianca A319 arrives at Bogota entangled in ‘balloon’ debris.
Colombian investigators are probing an incident in which an Avianca Airbus A319 arrived at Bogota trailing a large quantity of entangled ribbon-like debris from its wings, stabiliser and fin.

The airline says flight AV29 from Orlando to Bogota on 31 December was “hit by a hot-air balloon” during its landing at Bogota’s El Dorado airport.

It had touched down at 20:09, the carrier states, and was towed at 20:59 following an inspection by firefighting personnel who found no immediate problems with the aircraft.

“Passengers who had connections to other destinations were able to [meet them] without any inconvenience,” the airline adds.

Precise circumstances of the incident have yet to be clarified by investigators. The aircraft, which had conducted its approach to runway 13L, had already landed when the incident occurred, the airline indicates.

Video footage of the aircraft (N557AV) circulating on social media shows the debris hanging from its right and left wings, as well as the inlets of its CFM International CFM56 engines.

N557AV is a nine-year old airframe having been delivered new to Avianca in early 2012.

Colombian air transport regulator Aerocivil, without referencing the incident, issued a statement on 31 December reminding those participating in end-of-year celebrations that launching balloons or using fireworks near airports “affects the safety of air operations”.

There is no immediate evidence of a specific pyrotechnic element to the balloon involved in the A319 event.


NOTE.
Due to computer limitations, unable to link to the YouTube Video: search "Avianca A319 balloon'. The extent of entangle debris is head-shaking. "Lucy... there gonna be some 'splainin to do".
 

bmcj

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Scary/bizarre incident...

Avianca A319 arrives at Bogota entangled in ‘balloon’ debris.
Colombian investigators are probing an incident in which an Avianca Airbus A319 arrived at Bogota trailing a large quantity of entangled ribbon-like debris from its wings, stabiliser and fin.

The airline says flight AV29 from Orlando to Bogota on 31 December was “hit by a hot-air balloon” during its landing at Bogota’s El Dorado airport.

It had touched down at 20:09, the carrier states, and was towed at 20:59 following an inspection by firefighting personnel who found no immediate problems with the aircraft.

“Passengers who had connections to other destinations were able to [meet them] without any inconvenience,” the airline adds.

Precise circumstances of the incident have yet to be clarified by investigators. The aircraft, which had conducted its approach to runway 13L, had already landed when the incident occurred, the airline indicates.

Video footage of the aircraft (N557AV) circulating on social media shows the debris hanging from its right and left wings, as well as the inlets of its CFM International CFM56 engines.

N557AV is a nine-year old airframe having been delivered new to Avianca in early 2012.

Colombian air transport regulator Aerocivil, without referencing the incident, issued a statement on 31 December reminding those participating in end-of-year celebrations that launching balloons or using fireworks near airports “affects the safety of air operations”.

There is no immediate evidence of a specific pyrotechnic element to the balloon involved in the A319 event.


NOTE.
Due to computer limitations, unable to link to the YouTube Video: search "Avianca A319 balloon'. The extent of entangle debris is head-shaking. "Lucy... there gonna be some 'splainin to do".
I saw a report on this about a week ago. The story led me to believe that this was on approach to landing at night and it was one of the large festival balloons that they craft from paper and light weight plastic streamers and lift up with heat from candles.
 
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12notes

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The controller was one of the good ones really trying the help the pilot as well.

If you ever hear a controller tell you the altimeter setting out of the blue, you probably just blew an altitude restriction and they don't want to have an audio record that can result in action. "You've exceeded the class C" or "check altitude" is admitting a problem, "Altimeter 2983" is not admitting anything, and allows you to correct a problem without making a bigger deal about it or requiring a post flight phone call.

A altimeter setting of a nearby airport when in the flight levels is really not necessary, as your altimeter is supposed to be set to standard 29.92 above 18,000 feet.

I wouldn't think it was a rapid decompression crash, but possibly a never compressed crash, the cabin pressure malfunctioning or never switched on with the slow onset of hypoxia during the climb, ending with the pilot slumping over the controls. Another possibility is a medical issue (stroke, heart attack, etc.) with the pilot. I agree with Burt Reynolds that it sounds like incapacitation.
 

jedi

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I thought the voice replies indicated hypoxia onset. Would be nice to tie replies with altitude. Does his autopilot have speed protection? Could be the autopilot allowed the aircraft to spin in.
Any flight recorder onboard?
 

12notes

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I thought the voice replies indicated hypoxia onset. Would be nice to tie replies with altitude. Does his autopilot have speed protection? Could be the autopilot allowed the aircraft to spin in.
Any flight recorder onboard?
In the video, the second number underneath the call sign is the altitude in hundreds of feet. First call to Seattle center is at 12,900 feet.
 

bmcj

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Rapid decompression is normally very noticeable and the pilots would don masks or select lower, not continue as part of a normal flight operation without saying anything. This was either a gradual failure of the compression system, or (more likely) an incorrect selection of the pressurization mode by the crew.
 
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bmcj

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Not sure of location or time but this popped up on face book, it's a Bensen type gyrocopter doing a "Thrash job"

Could be just about anytime since the introduction of the Bensen design. Lots of Bensen builders thought they could teach themselves to fly a gyro, and most of them had a similar outcome.
 
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