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Crashes in the News - Thread

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Geraldc

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Nov 12, 2011
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Is this the typical encroachment of housing and business around an airfield? City planners allow building over almost every emergency landing option. Then want to close the field because it no longer has any emergency landing options?
The Sallanches aerodrome in France has been closed for developement.It is the only safe place in the area to land.
At the hearing to try to overturn the decision The Chairman suggested to land microlights on the Heliport at the Sallanches Hospital.
They are among us everywhere.
 

rbarnes

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Aug 28, 2015
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379
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Texas
Just found this recent upload to YouLube.
Walked away with only minor injuries




doubleface.jpg
 

TFF

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Memphis, TN
I saw a student do that but did not hit anything. I told the school mechanic that plane should be checked. Nothing wrong but a miracle. The grass between the runway and taxiway is really drainage. After he slid through the grass over the taxiway, through the grass between the main ramp, he came to stop on the helicopter pads. Taxied to tie down, payed up and never said a word and never came back. Saw another do it in a Lance. He hit the second grass section right at a culvert. Ripped the nose gear off, tore the prop up, and launched it over a cross taxiway until it dug in. The guy goes, what happened?
 

Wanttaja

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Sep 15, 2013
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Seattle, WA
Did you notice? He was trying to steer with the yoke!
Was he on something..or too few flying lessons ?
Just ordinary reflexes. Most people spend far more time driving cars than flying airplanes. And using the yoke to "steer" works just fine, off the ground. It's just for ~20-30 seconds per flight that it doesn't work, and car-driving reflexes can easily come out in an emergency.

Ron Wanttaja
 

rbarnes

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Texas
Did you notice? He was trying to steer with the yoke!
I think he had his foot jammed down on the right rudder because his mind thought it was the accelerator pedal and needed to go faster too.
Watch his knees. After he puts in that hard right rudder he never lets it up. Right foot locked to the floor.

Report says "student" so I'm assuming he just got signed off solos in the pattern and was practicing what not to do.
 

Aerowerx

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Dec 1, 2011
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5,646
Location
Marion, Ohio
Just ordinary reflexes. Most people spend far more time driving cars than flying airplanes. And using the yoke to "steer" works just fine, off the ground. It's just for ~20-30 seconds per flight that it doesn't work, and car-driving reflexes can easily come out in an emergency.

Ron Wanttaja
I once read about a Navy pilot that was trying to transition to a C172. On one approach the CFI told him to go around. So he pulled back with his right hand and pushed forward with his left*. Reflex from his Navy training.

*For those newcomers to aviation, you fly a jet fighter with the right hand, throttle in the left.
 

TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
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Memphis, TN
I would want to see his solo sign off because I bet he was flying in way more crosswind than limited too. Once lizard brain takes over, hard to stop it.
 

jedi

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Aug 8, 2009
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2,295
Location
Sahuarita Arizona, Renton Washington, USA
Did you notice? He was trying to steer with the yoke!
There is a name for that. It is called the law of primacy.

It is one of the questions on the CFI written test.

The student learned to drive before he started flying. In times of stress he reverts to controlling direction with the wheel. I see that far more in recent times than back in the 70’s.

Back then instructors generally had tail wheel experience and knew you had to steer with your feet. Students did not solo until they were proficient with the rudders.

Now days it you can turn and fly up and down while you talk on the radio you are good to go. You only need the rudder pedals to taxi to or from the runway.

The rudders always control where the aircraft is pointed laterally. It is called yaw.

The rudder is a flight control. It is the only flight control that always works as advertised, push right, go right.

Unfortunately this is opposite several other common forms of transportation such as tricycles, snow sleds and bicycles. This can cause further confusion in the students mind and cause the student to minimize trust and use of the rudder. The rudder always controls yaw.

The elevator controls pitch and speed. Pull back to pitch the nose up. Pull back more to pitch the nose down in either a stall if too slow or in inverted flight if you are fast enough to make it that far.
In normal level flight pull back to slow down, push forward to go fast. In inverted flight do the opposite.

Ailerons control roll in normal flight but not when you get slow or are on the ground.

At least that has been my experience.

The bottom line is if the aircraft has a rudder the student and/or pilot should know how and when to use it.
 
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