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Crashes in the News - Thread

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Vigilant1

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Toronto, Student pilot, only Minor injuries amazingly.
Yes, the student pilot was very lucky to avoid serious injury. It's hard to tell if he ever got on the binders, just seemed to stick with the go-around decision despite the developing situation.
 

BBerson

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Possibly forgot to fly the plane.
The pilot possibly never flew the airplane with the engine off. A big difference with a dead engine and huge prop windmilling the huge dead engine and compared with the typical low drag approach with the engine at idle. I don't know if the military had feathering or not. Or if they were taught to bail out.

The witness said "engine stalled (translate as engine stopped), nose dipped (wing stalled) and spiraled down (spun in).
 
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TXFlyGuy

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According the the report it was a Titan Mustang powered by a Honda V6. So what does a 'huge engine 'and 'huge windmilling propeller' have to do with it, least of all a feathering system?
The T-51 is actually a good glider, if (IF) you pull the prop all the way back into full course pitch.
Allow me to introduce some educated speculation...the engine was the super-charged version. If auto fuel was being burned (it probably was), the engine might have been over boosted causing detonation with resulting failure.

The most important thing for us to take away is to simply fly the plane.

"Always fly the plane all the way through the crash."
R.A. "Bob" Hoover
 
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BBerson

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So what does a 'huge engine 'and 'huge windmilling propeller' have to do with it, least of all a feathering system?
The scale four bladed prop with large diameter with a gear drive is a large proportion of the wing span compared with other sport planes. I don't see how the sink rate after engine failure can be tame. The prop is windmilling the engine through the gearbox so it's spinning the engine at high rpm. Can it even do that or does the prop stop in flight?
What is the sink rate?
 

Bille Floyd

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One of the more well known B-25 expert pilots is an old friend of mine.
I belonged to a sailplane club in Jean Nv , back in 1998 ; after flying
one of the club members, (and best pilot in the club) told me over
a few beers, that he use to fly the B-25 , as a gun-ship, not a bomber
in Vietnam. I was Really surprised, about that !!! Does the name Holden
ring a bell ?

Bille
 

Victor Bravo

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No, my friend is a different guy than that. I looked up the story in a little more detail and I don't think that my friend was on that flight.

It was also possibly one too many beers for one of you... if I'm not mistaken it was the A-26 that was occasionally used in Vietnam with guns on the nose. The B-25 was about 100 or 150 miles an hour slower, and may not have been able to outrun the arrows being shot at it by the NVA.

If you flew in Jean, did the name of old Dick McKnight ever come up? He had the glider operation at the old Boulder City airport, 10 or 15 miles over the hills from Jean. Dick gave me my first intro flight in a glider, and also happened to be one of the small number of WW2 Waco troop glider pilots that lived through crash-landing troops behind the lines in Normandy.

On my first intro glider ride, we were on downwind at about 500 or 600 feet, committed to land, and the ground crew pushed a glider out onto the runway without looking up and checking the pattern. This crusty old combat glider pilot unlatched and swung the great big canopy of the 2-33 open, leaned his head out over the side, and (honest to goodness) with one hand on his hat and a cigar butt sticking out of his mouth, he yelled down from the sky like a drill sergeant to "get that !)(#*$ glider off the !(#&% runway!!", and the tiny little people started scurrying around like cockroaches... and pushed it off to the side just before we landed.

As a 17 year old spoiled brat, who loved airplanes with all his heart, I didn't know whether to laugh or s**t my pants. I may have done both.
 

Bille Floyd

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It was also possibly one too many beers for one of you... if I'm not mistaken it was the A-26 that was occasionally used in Vietnam with guns on the nose. The B-25 was about 100 or 150 miles an hour slower, and may not have been able to outrun the arrows being shot at it by the NVA.

If you flew in Jean, did the name of old Dick McKnight ever come up? He had the glider operation at the old Boulder City airport, 10 or 15 miles over the hills from Jean. Dick gave me my first intro flight in a glider, and also happened to be one of the small number of WW2 Waco troop glider pilots that lived through crash-landing troops behind the lines in Normandy.
...
The A-26 ? I will remember that . Holden showed me the same plane
at an airshow located at Nellis ; and it only had 1 tail, (so your correct).
Beer will do that to me !! Ha

My sisters kid, had a ride in a sailplane , at the old Boulder City airport
in the early 80's ; be Cool, if it was the same pilot !!

Bille
 

Victor Bravo

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The B-25 wreck in Sacramento was not being flown by my old friend, he e-mailed me back to let me know. I truly hope that the cause of the incident was something beyond the pilot's control, and that the airplane is (somewhat) easily repairable (as warbird wrecks go).

My flights at Boulder City started in 1977 or 78 if I recall. Borrowed a car from an old school casino guy in Vegas (really, a no-neck pit boss whose middle name was "the") and drove out to the gliderport to take my intro ride with Dick. On the very first flight I was hopelessly addicted and hooked for life, far worse than Keith Richards :)

The owner of the glider school put me with Jim Jenista, a former Naval Aviator (who flew the first carrier-based nuclear bomber, the AJ-1 Savage) as my instructor. I'm incredibly fortunate to have had Jim as my instructor.
 
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