Crashes in the News - Thread

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BJC

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Interestingly enough, most of the people I've met who have the chops and justification to look down their noses at other pilots... don't.
Same experience here, with the single exception of some AF general from Pop’s state.

BTW, I’m not one of those who
I know people who would consider anyone who hasn’t pushed out at -7 g, done outside snaps on a down line, or flown 360 rollers, not to be a real pilot.
That statement was offered as a counterpoint to Dogg’s assertion that Saville isn’t a real pilot.


BJC
 

Victor Bravo

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I was confident you ain't one of them :)

Believe it or not, I've run into a lot of that holier than thou crap in the back country flying world (at least on the internet discussions). The C-180 and Super Cub guys were better than everybody else. The fact that I was trying to sell them something made it 10X worse. Then the subject of California came up... and all hell broke loose :)
 

bmcj

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By far the nicest, friendliest and most accommodating pilot was Art Scholl.

Still stunned he died as he did.
Art was someone that people either loved or hated. I used to hang out with him all the time (starting as a kid hanging out in his hangar) and got along with him quite well, but I’ve run across others that would call him an a••hole SOB.
 

TarDevil

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Art was someone that people either loved or hated. I used to hang out with him all the time (starting as a kid hanging out in his hangar) and got along with him quite well, but I’ve run across others that would call him an a••hole SOB.
Only talked to him that one time, so he easily could've had a good day:D.
 

davidb

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FWIW, I’m hearing several experienced helicopter pilots saying it is very difficult to transition to instruments when inadvertently entering IMC. There’s plenty of cases of fixed wing pilots succumbed by vertigo and spatial disorientation in similar circumstances. Apparently the control characteristics of helicopters makes vertigo worse and a resulting unusual attitude recovery is more challenging than in a fixed wing airplane.

I know I shared this previously but I’m hearing it from more and more highly experienced pilots with both ratings. They are also saying two pilots are needed to increase the safety of these types of marginal weather ops.
 

blane.c

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I was confident you ain't one of them :)

Believe it or not, I've run into a lot of that holier than thou crap in the back country flying world (at least on the internet discussions). The C-180 and Super Cub guys were better than everybody else. The fact that I was trying to sell them something made it 10X worse. Then the subject of California came up... and all hell broke loose :)
I owned and flew a experimental cub and then a Cessna 140 (1st plane a 7AC) and also flew Transports in the boonies. Many of the people I flew with had there own planes also many of the mechanics. Most pilots/aircraft owners have a great respect for others of there ilk. I liken the Cessna 185 to the best bush plane ever built … for it's size … no way it'll carry what a DC-4 will out of 1600ft. So it is all relative.
 

Richard6

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From the Forbes site:
"
The helicopter that crashed Sunday killing basketball star Kobe Bryant and eight others was owned by a charter company that was certified to operate under visual flight rules, and it was not permitted to carry passengers in weather that limited visibility to the point that its pilots would need to fly solely based on their cockpit gauges, a former pilot for the company told Forbes."

This guy sounds like sour grapes to me. Probably got kicked out for some infraction and is now getting back at them.

I also looked up some of the specs for the Sikorsky S76B:
Technical Specifications
Max Speed: 155 kts or 178 mph

The information I have seen on this flight indicated that the helicopter had reached a speed of 184 MPH. Past the VNE of this aircraft.
 

blane.c

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A DC-4 will operate out of 1600 feet? With how much payload?
About 5,000lbs and min. fuel. Normally carries 20,000lbs and a lot of fuel. Depends on things like dry runway not muddy, wind, it helps that the runway is uphill going in and downhill leaving, you know the usual.
 

Jay Kempf

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He thought he was in control...
120 bank Hard left turn 45 deg nose down
the ground scars fan out in the direction of impact
just because you passed the check ride doesn't make you proficient
what a waste
He was the chief pilot for that operation...
 

D Hillberg

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He was the chief pilot for that operation...
Doesn't mean anything beyond the 135 ops manual.
B
o
s
s

B
u
t
t

K
i
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s
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?
Not enough flights to keep proficient in IMC- Lots of VFR in SoCal.
Costs of keeping a business going... No real training as it costs $$$$
Public service can train all day [spend that taxes]
Private Companies cut costs to stay in business. . . Why spend $$$ for something used so little?
Seen lots of dead "Chief Pilots" few good pilots.
 

blane.c

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As co-pilot I would allegedly cut the mixes over the threshold (touchdown), cowl flaps full open, props full forward … guard mixes and when rpm's dropped to 900 pull them back up or on really short strip just the inboards up (the one's with the hydraulic pumps). 4's don't have reverse like 6's do.
 

Victor Bravo

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I'd like to see that done :) I have no experience at all in large transports. It would sure be cool to see one of those old dogs doing that kind of boogie woogie, 75 years after it was built, still making a living out in the boonies. But some little voice in my head tells me that in order to see that, I'd have to go to a place where it's a lot !(#*$& colder than Southern California.....
 

TXFlyGuy

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Chief pilot usually flies the least out of all the pilots on the roster.
A Chief Pilot rapidly becomes a professional "desk flyer". In some cases, the most dangerous person in the cockpit. Reference the MD-80 that crashed while trying to land in a heavy (+++) thunderstorm in Little Rock. Chief Pilot in the left seat, brand new hire in the right seat.
 

blane.c

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I'd like to see that done :) I have no experience at all in large transports. It would sure be cool to see one of those old dogs doing that kind of boogie woogie, 75 years after it was built, still making a living out in the boonies. But some little voice in my head tells me that in order to see that, I'd have to go to a place where it's a lot !(#*$& colder than Southern California.....
Actually most short field work is for miners, They are in someplace more tropical in the winter. They use liquid water for mining when it gets hard they leave.
 

wktaylor

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Never fly in the cockpit with someone braver than you. ~Richard Herman Jr.

Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver, but less daring.” –Herman Melville, writer
 
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