Could they have done anything differently?

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations / Flight Safety / Better Pil' started by rrruuunnn, Oct 17, 2008.

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  1. Jun 7, 2009 #21

    handprop

    handprop

    handprop

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    I can tell you from experience that with the Zenith STOL series of airplanes, if your below 300' when the engine quits, your in bad shape if your in a climb and need to do a 180. The drag is a killer on these airplanes. That's one of the compromises when going to this type of airplane.


    Just my 2 cents.....Mike
     
  2. Jun 7, 2009 #22

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    It depends on the plane, wind, density altitude, and pilot proficiency. It also depends on your climb angle if you are trying to make it back to the runway. That's why best angle is better than best rate, at least until you get to a good failsafe altitude.

    Glider pilots typically practice rope breaks at 200' AGL. Power planes need substantially more. Regardless of the plane, it calls for quick reflexes and steep bank angles (45-60 degrees). However, it is important that those quick reflexes be tempered by knowing your abilities, your aircraft's requirements, and having the go/no-go altitude in mind as you climb.

    I'll look for a link for some experiments done in a Cessna to determine its turnaround requirements.

    Bruce :)
     
  3. Jun 8, 2009 #23

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    OK, here it is... aerobatic instructor Michael Church of Sunrise Aviation (Orange County John Wayne Airport) found that a Cessna 172 needs 350' for a turnaround. Here is a link to the page and video:

    Aerobatics in California

    Bruce :)
     
  4. Jun 8, 2009 #24

    handprop

    handprop

    handprop

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    Thanks for the great link Bruce!

    Mike
     
  5. Jun 8, 2009 #25

    wally

    wally

    wally

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    Thanks Bruce!
    Wow great video and some really nice flying too. Maybe that testing will save someone's backside some day.

    Did you notice that the ball was centered all the time? Nice coordinated turns. Very well done.

    From my experience, the first time you try it, it is really "pucker inducing" when you are low, slow, and have to shove forward on the control and all you see out front is dirt! It doesn't bother me quite as much now after flying my pitts a bit.

    Much better to never get into a spot like that in the first place. Always a good idea to do everything you can to insure the plane and pilot are in top notch condition for every flight!
    Thanks again,
    Wally
     
  6. Jun 8, 2009 #26

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    The truly important part of being able to survive a low altitude turnaround is to know your requrements for the existing conditions and to maintain the mindset that it will happen. When I say to maintain the mindset, I mean to always have that option foremost in your mind up to the minimum altitude. The best way to do this is to call off altitude to yourself in 100 foot increments up to your minimum turnaround altitude. That keeps your mind on task so you don't incur a delay trying to decide if you should. Anything below the altitude goes forward (or with amount of turn, but not a return to runway). Anything above that altitude calls for the turnaround.

    Of course, now that you know you can, you should also keep in mind that your job in an engine failure is to survive. If you have good, flat landable ground in front of you, it may be the best option in a marginal situation, even if you think you can make the return.

    Bruce :)
     

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